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College Sports: Vick Says He Will Go Pro

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posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 02:06 AM
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ESPN reports Marcus Vick is saying his dismissal from Va Tech is no big deal, as he will go pro and declare for this year's NFL draft.

Chris Mortensen gave his opinion, which is that Vick will be selected on the second day of the draft. He added the general view in the league is that Marcus is nowhere near the athlete his brother is (no kidding?), but that he's a better passer.

Hey, Chris! How do they compare as humans? And who is likelier to get suspended repeatedly, and finally cut, and cost some team a bundle because he has all kinds of legal problems? Then again, the way this thug is going, he might go down hard on big charges soon, before the draft happens.

If he stomps on another guy, this time during a pick-up game, and this time breaks his knee or ankle, he'll probably do a good many months in jail, or a year or two in prison. From what I've learned today, seems like it couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

B.H.N.




posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 07:26 AM
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the raiders will be drooling over this guy, Vick and Oakland sound like they are made for each other....



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 10:59 AM
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He certainly fits in the Raider mentality. I doubt that he will last until day 2, wth that last name.



posted on Jan, 7 2006 @ 02:52 PM
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I think you have a point, Gibbs, because while he's not nearly the athlete his brother is, he's still quite an athlete.

B.H.N.



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 12:43 PM
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Oh yes B.H.N., I agree he is quite the athlete. But a NFL organization needs a criminal like a boat needs a hole. I realize there will be someone that will take a chance on him, due in large part to his name. I don't know the criteria that they use to rate prospective picks but I know it's not just whether he can run, jump and pass. Look at his history, you know the saying "fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me." Who wants to be the third? I think he will go in the first day but not much before.



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 01:13 PM
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He claims it is no big deal he was told to leave the team? The only reason I have heard of him is because of that last name. If he is drafted as a QB, I doubt we will ever hear of him again. If he is drafted as a receiver, then maybe. Otherwise, yes, jail does sound like an option for him.

iaclonz, you made me laugh!! thanks!!



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by iaclonz
Oh yes B.H.N., I agree he is quite the athlete. But a NFL organization needs a criminal like a boat needs a hole.


Rae Carruth, Ray Lewis, Maurice Clarett (OK, never actually in the league), Lawrence Phillips...

crayon, wil he be a cellmate with Clarett?



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 11:03 PM
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Y'all need to make distinctions between various crimes, instead of just calling someone a "criminal." ANY experienced prosecutor or defense attorney, and any non-alcoholic cop (if you can find one), will tell you that alcohol is a zillion times more likely to produce violent behavior than pot. It's involved in 50% of all homicides, 55% of all road fatalities, 70% of all suicides, and 80% of all domestic violence. So these guys who get popped for possession of pot are really no big deal. And I haven't smoked in well over a decade, so that's not me protecting my stoner turf, lol.

BUT.... Vick's felonious stomping on the guy's knee or ankle? Or Phillips' running the car into those three guys after the pickup football game, which has been charged as three attempted premeditated, deliberate murders, and might get plea bargained down to 3 assaults with deadly weapons (hopefully with consecutive sentences)? Or Clarett's alleged three armed robberies? Or a whole ton of these guy's other alleged crimes?

I'm a true blue defense attorney, both by nature and by profession, but if these guys plead guilty to those crimes OR allocute to those acts OR are convicted by juries--to say nothing of the sh*t Lewis stepped in the middle of, and especially to say nothing of what Carruth got nailed for--WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON?

The effects of drugs? I doubt it. The worst drug out there, in terms of likelihood of inducing very deadly, violent behavior, is not a subject of reasonable debate: It's methamphetamine, known on the streets as "crank." I could tell y'all LOTS about how it works on the human brain and why it's so terrible. But it's a drug generally used by poor white trash, and certainly NOT by zillionaire athletes of whatever race.

Heroin and other central nervous system depressants DO NOT cause that kind of behavior, though the ABSENCE of those drugs, to a junkie, can cause such behavior. But the stars we're talking about can have whatever drugs they want, when they want them. Crack coc aine is another story. Contrary to the PC propaganda we've all heard, it's a LOT worse in its effects on users' psyches and behavior than powder coke--and I got that STRAIGHT FROM MANY USERS WHO'D DONE LOTS OF BOTH powder AND crack versions.

But again, these guys get all they want, at least once they're in the pros. So w.t.f. is it with all the PRO players who are getting in all these troubles? It most certainly is NOT that they can't afford their habits or make connections, and it just as certainly has nothing to do with the various players' races, because lots of white players have gone down the same sump.

Wanna know what your friendly local criminal lawyer thinks?

I think these kids/thugs are getting the message--on far too regular a basis, and from far too young an age--that their @sses will be covered for almost anything, because of their great skills.

As I've probably mentioned here before, prior to going to law school, I ran a poker game in the back of a barroom. It was about 50 feet from the town police department. Now, I'm NOT a snitch by nature--in fact, I'm light years from it--but there are some things I think should be reported. I know how bad a drug coke is, even in powder form, and it destroyed the promising future of one of my best friends. So, back in the early 80's, when coke was more popular in the U.S. than pot, I told a police lieutenant who almost all the major coke dealers in town were, with the understanding all my info was hearsay and I would not testify. Using my info, he put all but one of them in prison and out of biz.

Another time, one of my card players wanted to sell me a shotgun which was sawed off down to the stock. It was a single-round shotgun, but it could have taken out a lot of people, especially if the p.o.'ed drunk wielding it could reload quickly. I asked the Lieutenant if I could have the $35 the guy wanted, to buy the shotgun, then surrender it for destruction. Doug said, "No, if we pay for it, we gotta investigate." So by prearrangement with Doug, who was the then-commander of the graveyard shift, I bought the thing with my own money and walked it next door to the station, where Doug destroyed it.

Years later, Doug told me I was the best C.R.I. he had ever heard of. A "C.R.I." is a Confidential Reliable Informant, whereas a "C.I." is a Confidential Informant. The latter is a garden variety snitch who gives people up to work off his/her own cases. A C.R.I. is a good citizen who selectively reports things to the police to help stop certain types of crimes--e.g., like a drunk's shooting 5 or 10 people in a bar with a no-barrel shotgun.

Years later, Doug told me, "You were the gold standard for C.R.I.'s. On my shift, you could have gotten away with anything but a homicide." Gee, how nice to know I could have committed armed robberies, sexual assaults, other brutal attacks, etc....

Anyway, my point is that without ever having done any of that stuff to earn the good graces of the police and stop a load of crimes, possibly including homicides, these guys seem to think they, too, can get away with "anything but a homicide." And it's NOT because they've ever lifted a finger to try and make their town safer, prevent a major act of violence, put a stop to large-scale distribution of a BAD drug (trust me) like coke, etc.

No, it's because they can pass a football, catch it, or run with it, thereby swelling the school's athletic coffers. AND EVERYWHERE THEY'VE BEEN SINCE THEY CAME TO COLLEGE AND/OR THE N.F.L., EVERYONE HAS REINFORCED THE NOTION THEY ARE KING AND CAN HAVE WHAT THEY WANT, DO WHAT THEY WANT AND GET AWAY WITH WHAT THEY WANT, with nothing more than a tongue-lashing or a few nights in jail or work camp as penance, no matter how egregious their misdeeds.

Yesterday, I was like Toejam and ready to declare myself a huge fan of Va Tech. Now it seems Vick should have been expelled quite a bit sooner. But I still admire them--a lot--for dumping him unconditionally when they did. My guess? His third year in the N.F.L. will not happen. I do not think he'll go down as hard as I think Clarett will go down, and I do not think ANY sports figure will go down as hard as Lawrence Phillips, because I think they will charge him with 3 attempted premeditated murders for that post-game alleged attempt to run down those kids.

If it happened as it's being alleged, those were three attempted premeditated murders, and as I said elsewhere, under California law, that's 21 years to life, as in, 21 years and THEN you can beg three ex-cops for parole. Good luck, Lawrence, you puke.

Here's my bottom line: As for whichever ones turn out to be guilty as charged, they had everything HANDED to them, and now I hope they get their heads handed to them. What the hell were they thinking?

But our twisted sports society has to take some of the heat, too. Schools teach these CHILDREN and VERY YOUNG ADULTS that they are gods and that their @sses are covered no matter what, and then look the other way time after time after time after time.

With a decent person, it wouldn't matter. Like when "Lieutenant Doug" told me I could have gotten away with anything but homicide. So what? Think I'm going to commit a brutal home-invasion robbery, just because I can? Not exactly. Would any of you? Of course not! But if you are a sociopath, devoid of any sense of right or wrong, and devoid of any feelings for what your words and actions do to those around you, especially victims.... Well, I can see where you'd want to take that kind of license and RUN WITH IT.

Obviously, a bunch of them did exactly that.

B.H.N.



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 11:26 AM
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ANY experienced prosecutor or defense attorney, and any non-alcoholic cop (if you can find one), will tell you that alcohol is a zillion times more likely to produce violent behavior than pot. It's involved in 50% of all homicides, 55% of all road fatalities, 70% of all suicides, and 80% of all domestic violence. So these guys who get popped for possession of pot are really no big deal.




I don't think the nature of the crime holds any weight here at all. Sure, maybe to a judge, jury or attorney it matters and you can say this crime is worse than that crime, to determine a just sentence. Suspensions, bad press, possible jail time, ect. that sh*t is another burden that an NFL organization doesn't need.

Let me ask you a couple of questions B.H.N. Is marijuana a substance deamed illegal by all professional sports? Is marijuana a substance that is illegal in all 50 states? Does it bring a certain amount of negative press everytime an athlete is busted with marijuana? I think I can answer all of those questions on my own but feel free to answer them yourself. I hold the same opinion as you, alcohol is more dangerous and causes more problems than pot. But you can't say it is no big deal. It's illegal whether we like it or not.

You are right IMO that these athletes are getting the wrong message, they think they are above the law. I think that in a lot of cases it is a result of their past. You said it yourself, THUGS. Look at Clarett, what would give him the notion that he would be protected after his actions, and by who?

So, my point is that no matter the crime it brings bad press and other garbage that an organization doesn't need. Like I said before, someone (Al Davis, Jerry Jones) will always scoop these guys up and take a chance. But the owners and administrators that don't want their franchise drug through the mud will steer clear of players that are habitual offenders. (Marcus Vick)

Win at all costs! That is the message we send to our youth. This starts in High School definitely, but sometimes sooner. When I was in H.S. I witnessed two football players slip out of a party that had been busted and later found out that the officer on the scene was the one that directed them to do so. That is horsesh*t since when I got busted (I played Golf) I was suspended for 3 weeks.

I also hope these guys all get punishments that fit their crimes. And in Marcus Vick's case I hope he gets drafted and the only news we hear about him again is incredible statistical lines from the latest game he played in.



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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RICHMOND, Va. — Former Virginia Tech quarterback Marcus Vick, booted from the team last week for his behavior on and off the field, was charged Monday with pulling a gun on three teenagers during an altercation in a restaurant parking lot.

Okay is there any debate now as to whether or not Vick will go in the 1st day?



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 04:03 PM
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He just causes so much controversy on teh field and now off.HE might go to jail.He's a bad seed IMHO and I'm sick of players like him.I don't know how someone could liek him.But tahts my opinion.

Anyway with that he might be one of teh last players drafted in teh draft because of his actions,but you never know



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 06:22 PM
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What I think is the real shame here is that his brother doesn't seem to be this type of personality. Michael may be a bit conceited, but he doens' tseem to be the violent type. How can two so talented brothers take 2 seemingly different paths?



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 06:22 PM
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There is something SERIOUSLY wrong with the Virginia criminal justice system if he's at liberty, and thus a fit subject for the draft, come this year's draft date--unless, of course, a lot of people have been making up wilfully and maliciously false stories about him.

B.H.N.



posted on Apr, 20 2006 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by friedbird12
He just causes so much controversy on teh field and now off.HE might go to jail.He's a bad seed IMHO and I'm sick of players like him.I don't know how someone could liek him.But tahts my opinion.

Anyway with that he might be one of teh last players drafted in teh draft because of his actions,but you never know


I know people who like him. I live in an area in VA heavily populated with VT fans. I know some of them that think that he is still the best of the best even though he's gone. Some even say that the WVU player deserved it. They make up things like the player said something to him earlier in the game. Like thats enough of an excuse to stomp on the guys leg. Yeah right. It just so happens also that most of the people who think Vick's actions were not wrong are the same ones that go to Virginia Tech and spit on the opposing teams fans.

But the sensible VT fans all think that his actions were extremely wrong and stupid. Those are the VT fans I like.




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