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Komodo dragons possibly evolving?

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posted on Dec, 21 2006 @ 09:50 AM
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Female komodo dragons may have a new weapon to combat the species' dwindling numbers in the wild. There have been at least two reports this year from female dragons reproducing asexually through a process called parthenogenesis. While it is known that other reptiles have this natural ability, it has never been observed in komodos, leaving the question of whether this is a true evolutionary step forward for the species or an ability that they've always had.




posted on Dec, 21 2006 @ 04:41 PM
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Its not something that evolves from one moment to another. And like the article says, its been seen in other reptiles, so its not a major discovery IMO. Komodo's are always studied in groups, soooo, bingo - No need for asexual replacement.



posted on Dec, 21 2006 @ 07:02 PM
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I agree with Thain Esh Kelch. I think that parthenogony is something that most--if not all--reptiles are capable of, given the correct circumstances. For example: many varieties of the so-called whiptail lizard have no males. They're a unisex species, but they reproduce parthenogenically. Some of them still require the mating ritual, though.


One of the surprising things about unisexual whiptail reproduction is that a courtship ritual is still required even though there is only one sex. Unisexual whiptails pair up. In the courtship ritual one female takes the part of a male, while the other takes the role of a female. Later the 2 lizards switch roles. The switch is caused by hormones: estrogen promotes female behavior; progesterone stimulates male behavior. The mating ritual is required for survival of the species: without it few eggs are released (ovulation).


Source.

It's still a pretty fascinating find, though likely not an evolutionary step.



posted on Dec, 21 2006 @ 10:52 PM
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Originally posted by Thain Esh Kelch
Its not something that evolves from one moment to another. And like the article says, its been seen in other reptiles, so its not a major discovery IMO. Komodo's are always studied in groups, soooo, bingo - No need for asexual replacement.
i agree but good post at least it startes a new subject



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