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Categories and Classes of Situation X

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posted on Dec, 15 2006 @ 10:47 AM
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What is Situation X?
Situation X is any major crises in which the local services, infrastructure, and/or commerce is unavailable for an extended length of time due to some manner of catastrophe.

What are the Categories of Situation X?
  • NATURAL DISASTER - Floods, fires, earthquakes, meteor, etc.
  • NUCLEAR/BIOLOGICAL/CHEMICAL (NBC) - Nuclear war, global pandemic, etc.
  • CONVENTIONAL DESTRUCTION/VIOLENCE - WWIII, Civil war, bombings, etc.
  • ECONOMIC - The Great Depression, banks failing, etc.
  • WARGAMES/THEORETICAL - Robot uprising, zombies, alien invasion, etc.

    What are the Classifications of Situation X?
  • Class 1 - City-level impact, 0-99 Deaths, 1 month or less.
  • Class 2 - 100 miles or less impacted, 100-999 Deaths, 1 year or less.
  • Class 3 - Less than 1500 miles impacted, 1k-1mil Deaths, years.
  • Class 4 - Global impact, 1mil+ deaths, indefinite timeframe.
  • Class 5 - End-Life-Event, Deaths measured in % of all life. Permanent.

    (MOD NOTE: Accidentally wiped out this post 2/7/2008. Here's what I managed to salvage)

    [edit on 2/7/2008 by thelibra]




  • posted on Dec, 15 2006 @ 11:51 AM
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    I'm waiting for you to start the zombie thread.


    Maybe we could get a script in development. Call me, our laywers should do lunch.







    posted on Dec, 15 2006 @ 12:12 PM
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    Originally posted by dr_strangecraft
    I'm waiting for you to start the zombie thread.


    Seriously? I'd be happy to. I'll start one after this reply.

    I held off on it before the Survival Forum got created cause I didn't want to jinx our chances ahead of time by getting us survivalists labled as whack-jobs. I have, however, mentioned "The Zombie Survival Guide" many times, as it is actually quite a well thought-out guide. I'll write one up.


    Originally posted by dr_strangecraft
    Maybe we could get a script in development. Call me, our laywers should do lunch.


    I would love to have had the opportunity, but it appears Brad Pitt beat me to the punch. "World War Z" is slated to be released as a movie in 2008. I can hardly wait. Both of Brook's "zombie" books were brilliant and displayed a level of depth and consideration I've never seen anyone put into a hypothetical before.



    posted on Dec, 15 2006 @ 12:50 PM
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    Yes, I found the zombie guide at the mall. love it! LOVED IT!

    Here's a link to the original zombie infection simulator:

    kevan.org...

    your welcome.


    .



    posted on Dec, 16 2006 @ 04:49 PM
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    I too have the Zombie Survival Guide, and its so serious and realistic, yet rediculous at the same time.



    posted on Dec, 17 2006 @ 07:21 AM
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    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 10:43 AM
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    I just realized I'd let this thread stagnate. Here's some more handy quick-reference information. The odds are not written in stone, and are of course subject to change, but should give you a relative idea of what the most likely causes of death are, compared to other causes, and thus be able to plan accordingly. There are some surprising statistics in here. The fact that you are almost twice as likely to die from a plastic bag as you are from an operation of war is staggering to me.


    Top Causes of Death


    Dying from Heart Disease----------------6 to 1
    Death from a suicide attempt-----------71 to 1
    Being killed in a car wreck--------------81 to 1
    Being killed in a hailstorm--------------106 to 1
    Chance that you were murdered------197 to 1
    Death from falling-----------------------217 to 1
    Being killed by Poisoning---------------344 to 1
    Death from Perscription Drugs---------358 to 1
    From Hanging or Strangulation---------615 to 1
    Death from broken bone--------------1,000 to 1
    Stabbed or Cut to death---------------1,700 to 1
    Being shot to death--------------------4,000 to 1
    Dying in a boating accident-----------5,000 to 1
    Drowning in water---------------------8,000 to 1
    Death as result of Hallucenogins----10,000 to 1
    Dying while in the bath tub----------10,000 to 1
    Death from Alcohol-------------------12,000 to 1
    Squished between 2 objects---------30,000 to 1
    Death by Bee Sting-------------------70,000 to 1
    Fatal Elevator Ride--------------------77,000 to 1
    Being killed in a Plane Crash-----116,000-25mil to 1*
    Killed by a Plastic Bag---------------130,000 to 1
    Dying from Operations of War------200,000 to 1
    Being killed by a Dog----------------235,000 to 1
    Due to Lack of Air--------------------270,000 to 1
    Dying from poisonous plants------1,200,000 to 1
    Being Killed by a Tornado---------2,000,000 to 1
    Killed by falling out of Bed---------2,000,000 to 1
    Being killed by Lightning-----------2,000,000 to 1
    Being killed by Freezing------------3,000,000 to 1
    Being killed by a Shark----------300,000,000 to 1
    Living to 116 years old--------2,000,000,000 to 1
    Hit by space debris------------5,000,000,000 to 1


    * almost impossible to calculate more accurately than this at any given timeframe, but still even post-9/11, the safest way to travel.



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 10:57 AM
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    where did you get those statistics? I find it slightly hilarious that being squished between stuff is more of a hazard than operations of war.

    DE



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 11:16 AM
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    Originally posted by DeusEx
    where did you get those statistics?


    I'd be hard pressed to remember all the sources, as it was about 3 or 4 years ago, but it was from a variety of statistical sites. Most of them were from National Safety Council estimates based on data from National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau.


    Originally posted by DeusEx
    I find it slightly hilarious that being squished between stuff is more of a hazard than operations of war.


    If you think about it though, it kind of makes sense. A lot more people work construction sites, rigs, dive sites, warehouses, docks, and other "heavy cargo traffic" areas than serve in the military. Additionally, whereas unskilled laborers are a dime a dozen, and safety procedures might be extremely lax, workers might be intoxicated or inattentive, and not everything done by the book.

    The military is, in contrast, extremely safe. Soldiers are not allowed to imbibe "unauthorized food and drink," they are repeatedly drilled to do things exactly in a certain why, by certain standards, and not to deviate. The safety procedures must always be followed, and one is not allowed to be authorized to use any weapon or equipment they have not been qualified and rated for. The result is a very safe environment if you can get past the whole "getting shot at" thing.

    (edit grammar, clarification, gnomes)

    [edit on 12/20/2006 by thelibra]



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 11:28 AM
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    Oh, I know it's safe. I'm 'in'. We're not allowed to self-medicate with so much as Halls Cough Drops, they value our safety so much...sort of. I just find it strange to have so few deaths considering the rate of injuries, especially those of a stress, repeat or chronic nature. Hell, on Basic right now we're had like ten people end up recoursed because they've done stuff like snapped Achillies tendons, gotten spiral fractures, pneumonia...

    DE



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 12:00 PM
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    Originally posted by DeusEx
    Hell, on Basic right now we're had like ten people end up recoursed because they've done stuff like snapped Achillies tendons, gotten spiral fractures, pneumonia...


    Oh, yar, my family has some crazy stories from the various members that became boots. BTW, thank you for serving your country. S!

    I think they probably excluded boot camp from "operations of war" since you can technically join the military, go through boot, be stationed, and never partake of an operation of war.

    Either that or the difference is in fatality versus injury. On a military base, you typically have "top notch" medical treatment right nearby, by a party with a vested interest in keeping you alive and getting you back to work as quickly as possible. A civilian, on the other hand, will almost certainly not have a corpsman nearby, and will be treated by a party with a vested interest in billing for services.

    Also, keep in mind the "Operations of War" statistic was from riiiight near the beginning of the War in Iraq. Since then, I bet the chances have increased significantly. I really should have updated the tables before posting it but figured the stats couldn't have changed too much in the last few years.

    PS: no offense to any military medics out there. By "top notch" I mean that sometimes, the best they can do is a roll of duct tape to keep the wound shut, because sometimes that's all the material that's available. But you can bet it'll be the best damn duct tape placement possbile.



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 12:43 PM
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    Originally posted by thelibra
    I think they probably excluded boot camp from "operations of war" since you can technically join the military, go through boot, be stationed, and never partake of an operation of war.

    Either that or the difference is in fatality versus injury. On a military base, you typically have "top notch" medical treatment right nearby, by a party with a vested interest in keeping you alive and getting you back to work as quickly as possible. A civilian, on the other hand, will almost certainly not have a corpsman nearby, and will be treated by a party with a vested interest in billing for services.


    The way I see it, boot is fierce-tame, and we still have about 15% of our original platoon strength sidelined from injury or illness. How bad is it going to be in the field? Also, I was one of the guys with penumonia, and I just BARELY scraped by with my original platoon. The medical care is terrible on garrison, from my experiences. Seven trips to the doctor's (most on the Mbdr's insistence) before they realized I needed antibiotics. And then they gave ones that didn't work.

    If I had a corpsman treating me, I'd have been happy. Instead, guess where all the MED A's did their internships under the supervision of civvie docs? (med A = medical assistant). I was...unimpressed.

    DE



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 01:11 PM
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    Here's the most up to date data I could find on the present statistic according to www.nsc.org...

    In 2003 the odds of dying from an Operation of War are 1 in 267,719.

    However, we've lost a lot of people since then, so I'm guessing it's probably dipped back below the 200k mark originally listed.

    That sucks about the pneumonia. Didn't they have any aspirin and duct tape?



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 01:19 PM
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    No duct tape.

    They started off giving me robutussin when I told them that I wasn't breathing at all when I was horizontal, almost. Eight bottles later, they realized it wasn't working and gave me sudafed. The only thing they got right was giving me ridiculous amounts of hycodan.

    No bed rest, though. They don't believe in bed rest.

    I'm also the platoon 'medic', having not only done well on the first aid courses, but having the honor of humping around the medkit. Know what's in there? Glowsticks, bandaids, and a facemask. Oh, and two rolls of gauze, and a half-roll of medtape.

    They take care of boots real good.

    DE



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 01:35 PM
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    Originally posted by DeusEx
    No duct tape...

    ...Know what's in there? Glowsticks, bandaids, and a facemask. Oh, and two rolls of gauze, and a half-roll of medtape.



    Well, you know... Ummm...we have to fight with the...tape we are given...and ummm...not with the tape we want?

    Geez... even my gramps had duct tape. Said it saved his life. He jumped on a 'nade back in one of the brushfires. Thank god for him (and all his descendants) it was a dud and didn't go off. Unfortunately, in the process of leaping on it, he also landed on a pig-sticker and popped a leak.

    So what kind of ailment can you treat with glowsticks?



    posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 02:38 PM
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    Originally posted by thelibra
    So what kind of ailment can you treat with glowsticks?


    Damned if I know, I'm an infanteer, not a real medic. I was never taught what the hell to do with the damn things, except illuminate stuff...which we're not supposed to do, because we're all tactical-like.

    DE



    posted on Dec, 31 2006 @ 07:56 PM
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    So what kind of ailment can you treat with glowsticks?

    Darkness. It's often hard to find the leak for the duct tape in the dark. Or you can use them to signal a helicopter to come in and medivac out. Or, if the glowsticks are flexible enough, you can use them for a tourniquet.

    Other than that, I just don't know. My neice made herself glow in the dark, though, with some punctured glowsticks. Was rather spooky. Is that a zombie deterrent, glowing in the dark?

    Regards-
    Aimless



    posted on Aug, 7 2007 @ 08:34 PM
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    That's funny! Glow sticks! Well Bill Clinton would have known what to do with them, and it wouldn't have been a tourniquet...



    posted on Aug, 7 2007 @ 08:49 PM
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    How would you survive a combined nuclear attack- zombie outbrake from nuclear fallout- ww3 scenario---just curiouse of your answer...????



    posted on Nov, 9 2007 @ 10:21 AM
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    Yes, it is going to depend alot on how often you participate in activities that lead to this happening to you. For example, if you frequently hike in winter conditions in the mountains your chances of dying by freezing are going to far higher than a couch potato in florida.



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