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Should drivers' be "extra-curicular" activities be limited by their organizations?

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posted on Dec, 11 2006 @ 11:12 PM
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With all the money spent by top organizations in NASCAR and other series on top drivers, should they be more strict about what they can and can't do outside of racing within their team?
Just this week:
Jimmie Johnson breaks arm in horseplay on golfcart: LINK
It seems like every year one or another top driver is getting hurt in some manner either in other circuits, like Dale Jr's fiery crash a few years back. I have seen Stewart and Kenseth race in low level stuff, such as sprint cars, a number of times here in Wisconsin; while they may have perfect control of their cars, there are many other drivers out with them, and all it takes is one wrong move or equipment failure, and their season, even career, could be done. Teams invest a lot of money in these drivers and cars to have their winning chances endangered by an injury, especially when it's a side event. Racing anything is dangerous as Johnson proved with this golf-cart stunt. But are drivers that hard to keep from competing and do they have the upper-hand over the owners say so? If NASCAR's top circuit keeps having rookie classes as successful as this years, Denny Hamlin being chief, and the COT (Car of Tomorrow) proves to be as expensive as it seems to be for teams to field, it may not be long before team owners have more say-so in drivers' everyday lives.

[edit on 11-12-2006 by AHCivilE]

[edit on 11-12-2006 by AHCivilE]




posted on Dec, 12 2006 @ 01:03 AM
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The answer to your question is "probably," but I don't think it's going to happen.

Mario Andretti honed his skills on dirt tracks long after he had made it big and drivers who are worth their salt want as much track time as they can get and because of what they are made of to begin with, they are going to be risk takers in their private lives, as well.

However, team owners have a lot invested in these guys and having them hurt themselves doing idiotic things doesn't make the business any less risky than it already is, but who wants a bunch of disgruntled drivers or a bunch of prima donas, such as Sacha Cohen portrayed in Will Ferrell's cinematic tribute to NASCAR.



Here's a short history of similar incidents and I'm sure this is not even the tip of the iceberg.

Comparatively speaking, Johnson mishap mild



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