It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The 'Bloop'

page: 3
6
<< 1  2    4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 7 2008 @ 10:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Opulisum
 


Never fear... our "buddy" is surely still dead, but dreaming in R'yleh. The "bloop" was recorded 11 years ago, right?
Plus, if our boy was awake, wouldn't half of us be on insane psychotic benders, and the other half busy playing victim and lamenting???





posted on Feb, 7 2008 @ 01:13 PM
link   
Oh god I hope not! lol I have never read LoveCraft books, but I really want to now



posted on Feb, 7 2008 @ 01:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by Opulisum
Oh god I hope not! lol I have never read LoveCraft books, but I really want to now


The Call of Cthulhu is a real treat... and yes, that is what would (approximately) be happening if the Great Old One was currently not dead, but dreaming. Have fun!



posted on Feb, 9 2008 @ 11:49 AM
link   
The bloop is definitely Cthulhu. Or the Cloverfield monster.


But in all seriousness, does anyone know what defines a noise that is biological in origin? Could it perhaps be a gigantic bubble of escaping gas from the earth's crust that bounced off a rock formation or something to produce a sound similar to that produced by a creature?

If it's not a creature (which, by all accounts, it could very well be) then I think escaping gas could be a likely candidate..

Edit: Voidmaster and I have the same avatar! High five!


[edit on 9-2-2008 by Trappestine]



posted on Feb, 9 2008 @ 01:11 PM
link   
I'de rather it be CloverField than gas, I really would. But Im guessing there are alot of possibilities to what it really could be.



posted on Feb, 14 2008 @ 02:42 PM
link   
I really think that it's not biological in nature. We have the tech to pretty much make the ocean transparent to our sensors. Active sonar. Active sonar doesn't come in pings and bleeps like in the movies. sonar is a giant occilator that can replicate any sound. Thats why synthesisers were created to emulate any sound...for and by the navy.

See what we do is we have our subs broadcast sound actively through our sonar. The sonar can sound like anything but a submarine which is the point. Sosus's job is to detect submarines. Sosus probably picked up the sound of a submarine broadcasting something in active sonar to make the sub sound like anything but a sub. The sub stays hidden behind it's false identity and gets the luxury of knowing exactly where everything is in the ocean around it.

our people know exactly what undersea landslides and gas eruptions sound like. we know exactly what whales and just about every creature in the sea sounds like. it's not a biological creature. but a generated sound by most likely tectonic activity. which if it's the case the navy already identified the sound a long long time ago. or it's an submarine trying to make an annomylus (sp) sound.



posted on Feb, 15 2008 @ 09:38 AM
link   
That is probably the case here, I guess just alot of people would want it to be biological in nature. it is still a possibility.



posted on Feb, 17 2008 @ 04:54 PM
link   
They found Leviathan.



posted on Mar, 11 2008 @ 07:00 PM
link   
Ok, here's my tuppence worth, as a latecomer and admitted massive Lovecraft fanboy.

Reasons for Cthulhu:

1) Proximity to R'Lyeh coordinates.

2) Soundfile gives me the willies, really.

3) We may never here this again, maybe the Great One was just turning in his sleep?

4) Interestingly, if this were mundane (tectonics etc) why report it?

5) If there's a possibility of it being an encroachment on the waters of a nation, would they likely admit to a breach?

6) With a posited (?) End Of Days scheduled for 2012, could it be the Great Cthulhu rousing from his slumbers?

7) If it is, can I have the day off work?

I'm feeling fairly ambivalent towards this, yet, it interests me more than a lot of other stuff on here, such as Ufology, which just seems to spew endless yay/nay-saying. I think there's a distinct possibility it could be an undersea gas release and am going to draw a slightly... jovial comparison:

If you look at the timeframe involved of the bloop, in the grand scheme of things it is still relatively short, whale sound tends to go on for longer periods. If you think of sitting in a bath full of water and passing wind, think of how much deeper and more gutteral it sounds, especially when compared with one let out in the open. If this is simply a large gas pocket under the surface being released, it could conceviably last for that sort of time period, if not longer - a large enough gas pocket could also take a long time to release.

Now, if someone (hopefully) has a decent background in undersea geology, tectonics etc and could disprove me, I'll dust my robe off.

Ia!!!

Chthulu Fhtagn!!!





posted on Mar, 12 2008 @ 07:41 PM
link   
its not gas,experts at marine biology have cinfirmed this,you an analyze the sound to tell if its bio- or other.i dont understand why people find it so hard to believe that large-very large creatures exsist in our deep ocean.just look at the recent footage of a 108 foot giant squid off the coast of mexico!maybe the rason this sound hasnt been heard since is this creature hibernates and only eats every once in a while/i dont know but i would be that it is a very large,undiscovered creature...........but i woldnt worry about it coming to shore,the pressure at that depth is is so great the creature would die if it rose above it-its like why deep sea fish die when we try to bring them up.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 02:37 PM
link   
Ok, do aquatic creatures hibernate? Anyone, I'd have thought this unlikely, unless they were dead, but dreaming...

Ia!!!



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 03:11 PM
link   
Scientists find hibernating fish in Antarctic
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have found an Antarctic fish that hibernates to conserve energy during the long southern winters.
Scientists have discovered an Antarctic fish species that adopts a winter survival strategy similar to hibernation। Scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and the University of Birmingham reveal, for the first time, that the Antarctic 'cod' Notothenia coriiceps effectively 'puts itself on ice' to survive the long Antarctic winter.




The study showed that the fish activate a seasonal 'switch' in ecological strategy -- going from one that maximises feeding and growth in summer to another that minimises the energetic cost of living during the long, Antarctic winter.
The research demonstrates that at least some fish species can enter a dormant state, similar to hibernation that is not temperature driven and presumably provides seasonal energetic benefits. Scientists already know that Antarctic fish have very low metabolic rates and blood 'antifreeze' proteins that allow them to live in near-freezing waters. This study demonstrates that Antarctic fish - which already live in the 'slow lane' with extremely low rates of growth, metabolism and swimming activity - can in fact further depress these metabolic processes in winter.
Lead author Dr Hamish Campbell, formerly at the University of Birmingham, UK but now at University of Queensland, Australia said, "Hibernation is a pretty complex subject. Fish are generally incapable of suppressing their metabolic rate independently of temperature. Therefore, winter dormancy in fish is typically directly proportional to decreasing water temperatures. The interesting thing about these Antarctic cod is that their metabolic rates are reduced in winter even though the seawater temperature doesn't decrease much. It seems unlikely that the small winter reductions in water temperature that do occur are causing the measured decrease in metabolism. However, there are big seasonal changes in light levels, with 24 hour light during summer followed by months of winter darkness -- so the decrease in light during winter may be driving the reduction in metabolic rates."
Dr Keiron Fraser from BAS says, "This is our first insight into how these fish live in winter. We have for the first time in the Antarctic, used cutting edge technologies combining tracking of free swimming fish in the wild and heart rate monitors to allow us to investigate just how these animals cope in winter with living in near freezing water and almost complete darkness for months on end. It appears they utilise the short Antarctic summers to gain sufficient energy from feeding to tide them over in winter. The hibernation-like state they enter in winter is presumably a mechanism for reducing their energy requirements to the bare minimum. The interesting question we still have to answer is why these fish greatly reduce feeding in winter when food is still available."
Why these fish chose to adopt this hibernation-like strategy during winter is currently unclear, but it presumably provides energetic benefits. The traditional views of hibernation are being challenged constantly. This study introduces a new group of animals that appear to utilise a hibernation-like strategy that allows them to survive during the long winters in one of the harshest environments on Earth.
Journal reference: The paper: Hibernation in an Antarctic fish: on ice for winter by Hamish A Campbell, Keiron P P Fraser, Charles M Bishop, Lloyd Peck and Stuart Egginton is published this week in PLoS One 3(3): e1743. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001743
About Antarctic cod
The 'Antarctic Cod' (Notothenia coriiceps) became isolated from its warmer water cousins around 30 million years ago when the Antarctic circumpolar current was formed. The olive-coloured fish has a broad head and a narrow body. Whilst scientists know that it has a glycoprotein antifreeze in its blood and it maintains a very low heart rate of less than 10 beats per minute, very little is known about its behaviour or how it evolved to live in Antarctica's extreme environment.
Adapted from materials provided by British Antarctic Survey.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 03:12 PM
link   
guess they do hibernate.............like i said we are learning new things everyday about the deep.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 09:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by jkrog08
Scientists find hibernating fish in Antarctic
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have found an Antarctic fish that hibernates to conserve energy during the long southern winters.
Scientists have discovered an Antarctic fish species that adopts a winter survival strategy similar to hibernation। Scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and the University of Birmingham reveal, for the first time, that the Antarctic 'cod' Notothenia coriiceps effectively 'puts itself on ice' to survive the long Antarctic winter.




The study showed that the fish activate a seasonal 'switch' in ecological strategy -- going from one that maximises feeding and growth in summer to another that minimises the energetic cost of living during the long, Antarctic winter.
The research demonstrates that at least some fish species can enter a dormant state, similar to hibernation that is not temperature driven and presumably provides seasonal energetic benefits. Scientists already know that Antarctic fish have very low metabolic rates and blood 'antifreeze' proteins that allow them to live in near-freezing waters. This study demonstrates that Antarctic fish - which already live in the 'slow lane' with extremely low rates of growth, metabolism and swimming activity - can in fact further depress these metabolic processes in winter.
Lead author Dr Hamish Campbell, formerly at the University of Birmingham, UK but now at University of Queensland, Australia said, "Hibernation is a pretty complex subject. Fish are generally incapable of suppressing their metabolic rate independently of temperature. Therefore, winter dormancy in fish is typically directly proportional to decreasing water temperatures. The interesting thing about these Antarctic cod is that their metabolic rates are reduced in winter even though the seawater temperature doesn't decrease much. It seems unlikely that the small winter reductions in water temperature that do occur are causing the measured decrease in metabolism. However, there are big seasonal changes in light levels, with 24 hour light during summer followed by months of winter darkness -- so the decrease in light during winter may be driving the reduction in metabolic rates."
Dr Keiron Fraser from BAS says, "This is our first insight into how these fish live in winter. We have for the first time in the Antarctic, used cutting edge technologies combining tracking of free swimming fish in the wild and heart rate monitors to allow us to investigate just how these animals cope in winter with living in near freezing water and almost complete darkness for months on end. It appears they utilise the short Antarctic summers to gain sufficient energy from feeding to tide them over in winter. The hibernation-like state they enter in winter is presumably a mechanism for reducing their energy requirements to the bare minimum. The interesting question we still have to answer is why these fish greatly reduce feeding in winter when food is still available."
Why these fish chose to adopt this hibernation-like strategy during winter is currently unclear, but it presumably provides energetic benefits. The traditional views of hibernation are being challenged constantly. This study introduces a new group of animals that appear to utilise a hibernation-like strategy that allows them to survive during the long winters in one of the harshest environments on Earth.
Journal reference: The paper: Hibernation in an Antarctic fish: on ice for winter by Hamish A Campbell, Keiron P P Fraser, Charles M Bishop, Lloyd Peck and Stuart Egginton is published this week in PLoS One 3(3): e1743. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001743
About Antarctic cod
The 'Antarctic Cod' (Notothenia coriiceps) became isolated from its warmer water cousins around 30 million years ago when the Antarctic circumpolar current was formed. The olive-coloured fish has a broad head and a narrow body. Whilst scientists know that it has a glycoprotein antifreeze in its blood and it maintains a very low heart rate of less than 10 beats per minute, very little is known about its behaviour or how it evolved to live in Antarctica's extreme environment.
Adapted from materials provided by British Antarctic Survey.



posted on Apr, 21 2008 @ 03:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by Opulisum
I'de rather it be CloverField than gas, I really would. But Im guessing there are alot of possibilities to what it really could be.

Or "Cloverfield's Gas"!

...disastrous!

[edit on 21-4-2008 by SumnerKagan]



posted on Aug, 11 2008 @ 06:19 PM
link   
Many people have theorized that Bloop is some kind of giant whale although I disconcern this because a whale must surface every two hours and surely someone would have noticed it by now.

Here is some facts that I can draw from the Bloop, if its animal:

1. As we know it is incredibly large.

2. It lives in the darkest depths of the ocean and can withstand the incredible pressure.

3. Although this is just conjecture, I believe that if it lives in the dark water, like all creatures in that depth, it could possibly possess some kind of "Bio-Illuminescence"( it could glow in the dark).

Another interesting sound to hear is called "Slow Down"(en.wikipedia.org...) which was recorded in the same year and not far from the Bloop sound. Could these two sounds be from the same creature?



posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 02:52 AM
link   
I must leak this out to the people. I am a government worker at a secret office in California that has been investigating the bloop for the past eleven years, and we have picked up several more of the Bloops within the past two days, as of 08/23/08. We have been told not to leak this information, as apparently the field team discovered something on the 21st of August, 3:00PM Pacific Time, near the location of the original sound. A large, ominous shadow in the water that came and went over a period of two days. When approached by researchers, it would emit a "strange sound" and flee. The large creature seems to be very shy, and resembles a large whale. That is all we know as of this moment. The listening posts picked up the familiar Bloop noise every time the creature emitted the large noise.

That is all we know of at this moment.



posted on Aug, 26 2008 @ 10:11 PM
link   
Personally I feel that the Bloop isn't being investigated by scientists because they already know about deep sea beasts that range from 350 feet to 560 feet long that can make any noise known to man.

It's called a nuclear submarine.

Lets face it active sonar tells you more about you surroundings than passive sonar. active sonar can be made to ping in any sound one can imagine. the sonar is literally hooked up to the worlds greatest synthesizers. The bloop could easily, easily be a submarine pinging its surroundings and disguising the ping as anything the damn well fancy it to sound like. in fact the best thing to make it sound like is something natural.

Also, I'm pretty sure submarines have the technology to "throw their voice" with these active pings. making them appear to originate from a location far away from the sub it's self.

SO that Bloop could be the US or the Soviets or the British. probably not the chinese, but could be anybody with the tech to do such a thing.

BLoop might be more interesting than a cryptoid. in fact the tech behind modern naval nuclear subs is astounding. knock your socks off "they can do that" type of tech. not all of it but some of it. the bloop could very well be man made.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:20 PM
link   
Wait, the Bloop is an ELF frequency pulse. During the Cold War ELF was used to communicate with submarines. Perhaps the Navy (Russian, American or maybe Chinese or North Korean) have created very advanced ELF transmitters for site-to-site communication between subs,or even ground installations. Perhaps the guy who decided on the position of the relay was a Lovecraft fan



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 03:21 PM
link   
Looks like Cthulhu is snoring. Hopefully nothing wakes him up for at least another 100 years. They should do some more investigation on this.

[edit on 27-8-2008 by nastalgik]



new topics

top topics



 
6
<< 1  2    4  5 >>

log in

join