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Dolphins & Greys

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posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 11:29 PM
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I've read that Dolphins are actually a cousin to the typical grey EBEs. That they were left here by the greys for some reason. Has anybody heard of, or read anything, relating to this?

-Chip




posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 05:15 AM
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Where did you read this if I may ask? You didn't perhaps see it/read it in Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy?



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 06:14 AM
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Hehe. No, it wasn't from there. I can't remember from what text it was from. I'm always reading books such as "The Alien Presence Among Us" , and "The Day After Roswell", so it could have been anywhere.



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 06:41 PM
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The Greys are descended from a dolphin-like or cetacean-based life form. There are several reasons for this supposition. The answer can be found in the similarities between cetaceans and Greys, using physical and behavioral aspects.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

Sorry I don't have any input aside from the link. I thought there was a thread reguarding this subject already, but I can't seem to find it. Interesting conversation, though!

[edit on 29/11/06 by an3rkist]



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 06:47 PM
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There are many theories concerning dolphins. They have always amazed me. Not only because they are beautiful, but also because they, like babies, seem to have knowledge of a "secret" that no one else does. They just seem to have a joy about them that is truly amazing.



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 07:18 PM
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www.nationalgeographic.com..." target='_blank' class='tabOff'/>
www.southwest.com.au..." target='_blank' class='tabOff'/>
www.captseaweed.com..." target='_blank' class='tabOff'/>
lundeensculpture.com..." target='_blank' class='tabOff'/>

[edit on 29-11-2006 by SpeakerofTruth]



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 11:53 PM
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Originally posted by SpeakerofTruth
There are many theories concerning dolphins. They have always amazed me. Not only because they are beautiful, but also because they, like babies, seem to have knowledge of a "secret" that no one else does. They just seem to have a joy about them that is truly amazing.


Well, actually dolphins aren't as intelligent as people would like to think. In fact, they're stupid.


Dolphins may have big brains but a South African-based scientist says lab rats and even goldfish can outwit them.
...
"The real flaw in this logic is that it suggests all brains are built the same ... When you look at the structure of the dolphin brain you see it is not built for complex information processing,"
...
"You put an animal in a box, even a lab rat or gerbil, and the first thing it wants to do is climb out of it. If you don't put a lid on top of the bowl of a goldfish it will eventually jump out to enlarge the environment it is living in, but a dolphin will never do that. In the marine parks the dividers to keep the dolphins apart are only a foot or two above the water between the different pools."

Source with more

Cross reference



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 12:00 AM
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Can't dolphin "stun" prey with some organ in their head, sort of like how Greys can supposedly "paralyze" humans if we look at them or something?



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 12:04 AM
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Look up the Troodon dinosaur on wiki, theres a guy who shows what they would look like today. Kinda scary results.



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
Can't dolphin "stun" prey with some organ in their head, sort of like how Greys can supposedly "paralyze" humans if we look at them or something?


Yes, dolphins have the ability to stun their prey, although it's not entirely certain how they do it:


Researchers have thought for a number of years that dolphins could stun or kill fish and squid with sounds they produce, having observed fish in dolphin pools swimming one minute and lying on the bottom the next. At first, researchers thought that dolphins used echolocation as the stunning sound, since dolphins are capable of echolocating very loudly (see below). Testing revealed that dolphins trained to echolocate powerfully at fish and squid did not stun them, so researchers began looking elsewhere for the stunning sound. Recordings of bottlenose dolphins and orcas in the wild have led researchers to now look at loud, low frequency sounds, possibly even burst pulse sounds, as the source of the dolphin's ability to stun prey.


www.dolphins.org...



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 12:24 AM
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Originally posted by an3rkist
Yes, dolphins have the ability to stun their prey, although it's not entirely certain how they do it:

It's believed that dolphins can do it, but there are no hard facts or proof. Some scientist say yes they can, whilst others disagree and say they use sound to locate prey, and nothing more:


The theory that dolphins stun their prey with sound has been around for almost twenty years, but no one had ever seen them do it, or even shown that the type of sounds dolphins make can stun or kill fish.
...
Other researchers remain unconvinced. "If they can prove it, I'd hate to be negative," says Pete Tyack from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution near Boston.

Source



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by Gemwolf
It's believed that dolphins can do it, but there are no hard facts or proof. Some scientist say yes they can, whilst others disagree and say they use sound to locate prey, and nothing more


A scientist for Earthtrust claims he has video proof that they stun their prey:


This week's New Scientist reports that Ken Marten of Earthtrust in Hawaii and Denise Herzing from Florida Atlantic University now have hard proof of this theory that has been around for almost twenty years.

In work submitted to The Journal of Aquatic Mammals, Marten and Herzing claim to have hard evidence of the behaviour captured acoustically and visually on videotape.


www.abc.net.au...

I'm not sure if this is significant or relevant, but Dr Marten has also captured shots of dolphins creating what he calls "bubble ring sculptures" (see pictures below.) He says that these bubble rings do not rise to the surface, and he has captured dolphins playing with these, including bouncing them off walls and such:





[edit on 30/11/06 by an3rkist]


Edn

posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by Gemwolf

Originally posted by SpeakerofTruth
There are many theories concerning dolphins. They have always amazed me. Not only because they are beautiful, but also because they, like babies, seem to have knowledge of a "secret" that no one else does. They just seem to have a joy about them that is truly amazing.


Well, actually dolphins aren't as intelligent as people would like to think. In fact, they're stupid.


Dolphins may have big brains but a South African-based scientist says lab rats and even goldfish can outwit them.
...
"The real flaw in this logic is that it suggests all brains are built the same ... When you look at the structure of the dolphin brain you see it is not built for complex information processing,"
...
"You put an animal in a box, even a lab rat or gerbil, and the first thing it wants to do is climb out of it. If you don't put a lid on top of the bowl of a goldfish it will eventually jump out to enlarge the environment it is living in, but a dolphin will never do that. In the marine parks the dividers to keep the dolphins apart are only a foot or two above the water between the different pools."

Source with more

Cross reference

Yet if the gold fish jumped out of its bowl it would die, the rat attempts to climb out the box with no idea if it will fall to its death. Not exactly smart if you ask me. Now it could well be that dolphins cant grasp the concept of jumping over a barrier but what if its simply that they don't do it because they know its not the right thing to do?



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 01:45 AM
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What would really settle this question about whether dolphins being related to Greys is to compare the dna of dolphins to the dna of greys. But that is where the solution breaks down, cause we dont have any grey dna, cause it is all just a fantasy.



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Edn
Yet if the gold fish jumped out of its bowl it would die, the rat attempts to climb out the box with no idea if it will fall to its death. Not exactly smart if you ask me. Now it could well be that dolphins cant grasp the concept of jumping over a barrier but what if its simply that they don't do it because they know its not the right thing to do?

Maybe. A goldfish isn't smart enough to know that it's going to die if it jumps out of the bowl. It learns the truth, but then it's too late.

It's normal animal behaviour to try and escape when captured. Most animals want to be free. But it goes beyond that. Capture a human and stick him in a box. What's going to happen? He's going to try and get out of the box. Does he know what will happen when he's outside the box? No. But the uncertainty doesn't stop him from trying to get out of the box.

Many dolphin enclosures are right next to the ocean. They can effortlessly jump over the low wall. Do they? No. Maybe they want to stay there? Maybe they like being in a cage and being fed? Who knows?

But that doesn't make the rest of the science go away. The fact that a dolphin's brain isn't designed to be clever. It's designed to survive in water.


Dolphins have a super abundance of glia and very few neurons ... The dolphin's brain is not made for information processing it is designed to counter the thermal challenges of being a mammal in water



[edit on 30-11-2006 by Gemwolf]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by Edn
Yet if the gold fish jumped out of its bowl it would die, the rat attempts to climb out the box with no idea if it will fall to its death. Not exactly smart if you ask me. Now it could well be that dolphins cant grasp the concept of jumping over a barrier but what if its simply that they don't do it because they know its not the right thing to do?


I agree with this statement. I mean, there's two possibilities. One: the dolphins cannot grasp the idea of anything beyond the barriers of their own little world, or two: the dolphins realize the risk of jumping over the barrier. However, one must beg the question, "How would they know it's a risk without trying it first?" Human nature has shown that we take risks to gain knowledge, but does that necessarily make us less stupid than dolphins? I mean, what good is knowledge if you're dead, right? For argument's sake, I'm going to post a link that proves that dolphins have intelligence; that may not compare to our own, but perhaps it does.

This dolphin was trained to pick litter out of her pool, and every time she did she was rewarded with fish. When a piece of litter was put under a rock in her pool, she started taking only pieces of the litter at a time, making one piece of litter end up leading to multiple rewards.


This behaviour is interesting because it shows that Kelly has a sense of the future and delays gratification. She has realised that a big piece of paper gets the same reward as a small piece and so delivers only small pieces to keep the extra food coming. She has, in effect, trained the humans.


Trained the humans? Haha!

www.guardian.co.uk...

The evidence supporting their intelligence level far outweighs the evidence supporting their lack thereof. Not to mention there are cases of dolphins acting in ways that few animal species act aside from humans:


Bottlenose dolphins sometimes kill much smaller harbor porpoises, apparently just for kicks, and engage in aggressive mating that looks, to humans, a lot like gang rape.


www.sfgate.com.../chronicle/archive/2004/08/29/TRG1R8DJID1.DTL

There was a thread on ATS about two years ago in reference to a news article about a "gang" of bottle-nosed dolphins that were going around killing porpoises. They were compared to modern day street gangs of the human race.

It seems the more we learn about dolphins the more they seem to be not just intelligent, but "human-like". Perhaps these discoveries support the idea that they may somehow be related to aliens, or may be aliens themselves. Of course, there's the possibility that we are, by definition, aliens, too.


By the way, this thread may be of interest also:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

There's some relevant information put out in this thread. Also, there's a link, (it's dead now), to a story of a man who accused a dolphin of attempting to rape him!


[edit on 30/11/06 by an3rkist]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 02:44 AM
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You should be careful not to confuse training with intelligence.

Training Animals
A parrot can "speak" just like a human, for instance, giving it the impression that it's intelligent. Is it? No. It's imitating sounds.

Goldfish for instance don't have a 3 second memory as popularly believed. They have very good memory, actually. (Well for their brain size.) They can remember mazes and other "life lessons".
Link

BF Skinner taught pigeons to do tricks - with simple reward systems.
Link

And everyone knows the story of Pavlov's dogs.

Action and reward. It shows some degree of intelligence, but it doesn't indicate "cleverness".

Science

Still, scientists contradict each other with every study. Maybe it comes down to the "test subject". Maybe some dolphins are clever and other stupid like with humans...


Let’s look at a couple of “studies” and believes concerning dolphins:

One study showed that dolphins have self-awareness: Article, but that doesn't necessarily indicate intelligence.

It seems that dolphins have a sense of humour:

the Dolphin seems to have been blessed with a well developed sense of humour. Dolphins have been known to silently manoeuvre behind an unsuspecting pelican and snatch its tail feathers -- usually leaving the bird minus a few. Other pranks include grabbing unsuspecting fish by the tail, pulling them backward a few feet as well as bothering slow turtles by rolling them over and over. Once a dolphin was seen placing a piece of squid near a grouper's rock cranny. When the fish came out, the dolphin promptly snatched the bait away, leaving the puzzled fish behind.

Source

A couple of people claimed to have been saved from sharks or drowning by Dolphins.
Link
Example 2

Then there are the seamen stories about dolphins "standing" in a circle as if they're taking part in some sort of ritual?

Dolphins have also attacked humans.
Example 1
Example 2

So clearly dolphins are very interesting and unique animals. Just how intelligent are they? Why not ask them? They communicate with clicks and whistles, and scientists have tried to "communicate" with dolphins using their language, but most of it remains nothing but the sound of clicks and whistles.

Are they alien?

Does any of it indicate alien origin? No. Dolphins are closely related to other sea mammals and if you believe in evolution you can trace them (their “origin”) back a long way. In my opinion I think it's an insult to dolphins to draw a parallel between them and "greys".

Edit: Clarity

[edit on 30-11-2006 by Gemwolf]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 02:46 AM
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I have only read page one and I am already aghast...

the only thing the greys have done is gentically engineered/manipulated species that the creator had created.

what a load of garbage! Why would a dolphin then save a human? Greys are not service to others orientated... I would be more inclined to suggest the Japanese fisherman who slaughter the dolphins are actually greys.. yanno preserving the SELF!!

I wouldnt give the greys that much credit!

They havent created anything except hybrids...and even then the breeding program is in complete shambles because they just cant get the gene pool etc right.

Saying the greys are related to the dolphins is giving them WAY too much credit!!



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 03:07 AM
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You should be careful not to confuse training with intelligence...Action and reward. It shows some degree of intelligence, but it doesn't indicate "cleverness".


You see, the example that I gave was not claiming that since dolphins could be trained they are intelligent. It's all about the fact that the dolphin went beyond the training, and realized that if it split the litter into multiple pieces it could get more rewards. This is evidence of a dolphin not being trained, but thinking for itself.


scientists have tried to "communicate" with dolphins using their language, but most of it remains nothing but the sound of clicks and whistles.


How can we even begin to attempt to talk to them in their own language unless we have translated the whistles and squeaks into English? The only thing scientists could possibly have done is made up sounds or used prerecorded dolphin sounds, which is shoddy scientific research. There's no way we have "tried to communicate with dolphins in their own language", because that would imply that we know and understand their language!

[edit on 30/11/06 by an3rkist]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 08:43 AM
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Originally posted by Gemwolf

Originally posted by SpeakerofTruth
There are many theories concerning dolphins. They have always amazed me. Not only because they are beautiful, but also because they, like babies, seem to have knowledge of a "secret" that no one else does. They just seem to have a joy about them that is truly amazing.


Well, actually dolphins aren't as intelligent as people would like to think. In fact, they're stupid.


Dolphins may have big brains but a South African-based scientist says lab rats and even goldfish can outwit them.
...
"The real flaw in this logic is that it suggests all brains are built the same ... When you look at the structure of the dolphin brain you see it is not built for complex information processing,"
...
"You put an animal in a box, even a lab rat or gerbil, and the first thing it wants to do is climb out of it. If you don't put a lid on top of the bowl of a goldfish it will eventually jump out to enlarge the environment it is living in, but a dolphin will never do that. In the marine parks the dividers to keep the dolphins apart are only a foot or two above the water between the different pools."

Source with more

Cross reference


This applies to the intelligence in exactly the same way IQ tests do - it's utter BS. It seems to meet that the Dolphin is intelligent enough to know that it is pointless to jump over the dividers. Or it is at such a stage of intelligence that it is simply content with its current surroundings and so doesn't feel the need to explore.

Maybe they tell each other (in their sonar language!) that the grass is exactly the same shade of green in this part of the tank as any others. Maybe they can actually tell each other the shade using binary in the 16.7 million colour table so they can get it spot on. Probably not, but I believe Dolphins really are much intelligent than we think.

So long and thanks for all the fish.



[edit on 30-11-2006 by morgansolutions]



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