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This board is knid of useless now

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posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by gman55

Well it's really cold here today, (-10) with wind chills arounds 30 below and I have to get to the store...so I'm outta here.

Btw If need be, you can always email me for support, but you are holding up well from what I can see.


I know just miss the tag teaming.

Ya you betcha, cold here too -40 WC below last night. I'm right next door to ya in Minnesota.




posted on Feb, 13 2007 @ 12:21 AM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
I don't think there's any evidence that H5N1 is more likely to spawn a new pandemic than any other type of pathogen.



Actually, the evidence suggests H5N1 is more likely to "spawn" a pandemic by hybridizing with other pathogens and becoming airborne, waterborne, vectorborne, and etc and cover all the bases.

But you're right - when it hybridizes, it won't be H5N1 any more...

Just a quick update on the 2006-2007 winter flu season:



During the last two months, he said, there have been new outbreaks of bird flu in Indonesia, Vietnam, South Korea , China, Thailand, Japan, Egypt, Hungary, Nigeria and Britain - and a new outbreak was reported in Turkey.

***

Bird flu death toll in Indonesia reaches 64

A 20-year-old woman died of bird flu Sunday, taking Indonesia's fatalities from the virus to 64, the highest of any nation in the world.

The woman's death came as Pakistan and South Korea reported new bird flu cases in poultry at the weekend.




posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow

Originally posted by djohnsto77
I don't think there's any evidence that H5N1 is more likely to spawn a new pandemic than any other type of pathogen.

Snip...But you're right - when it hybridizes, it won't be H5N1 any more...


Just a point here...H5N1 is technically always changing. There are several different clades now from the original 1996 HK sequence. Thru recombination or reassortment of gene segments and small changes in or near the domain binding site, H5N1 is gaining the ability to infect and replicate in more kinds of bio-diverse environments, including the mamilian species (bad for us). The prevailing clade is the Qinghai Lake sequence that emerged in China.

H5N1 is still the main canidate for a pandemic strain. It has shown a remarkable ability to adapt from avian to mamilian cells so far and has remained viable for a longer time and has expanded it geographical range more so than other circulating viruses.

H5N1 has also aquried serveral HUMAN polymorphisms which are NOT transient in nature, as they have become fixed in the gene segments...

So I disagree here...H5N1 will still be H5N1, pandemic strain or not.

Now H2N1 or H1N1 might make a come back as a pandemic strain but they would still be H2N1 or H1N1.

Hope I got your attention. H5N1 has mine...



posted on Mar, 24 2007 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
When the avian flu was breaking out, there was a serious potential for it to become a major pandemic with entire countries being destablized because of it. As it stands, that can still happen, its just not being as hyped in the media.

Absolutely nothing has changed from the day that the h5n1 forum was created. Heck, we've even found that tamiflu was less effective than we thought, and had worse side-effects.


Exactly. The H5N1 virus is still out there and still a very real threat. Just because CNN's not going mad over the subject doesn't mean theres no pandemic around the corner.

Now since the Tamiflu vaccination/treatment has proven it's uselessness, and that we don't have a viable second solution, it can come back and surprise us all.




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