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How hard is it to become a fighter pilot?

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posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 06:03 PM
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British pilots and American pilots will probably be equal, and are amongst the best in the world. The Israeli pilots are probably THE best, and that is what I read U.S. Navy pilots saying in a thread about this over on a Naval Aviation forum.

These were Navy fighter pilots who had flown with Israeli fighter pilots in exercises. They said the Israeli guys were just the best because of how they must train. In America, pilots go up on training exercises, and then they fly real-world missions where they may be shot at. Israeli pilots go up on training missions, but their whole country is surrounded by enemies, so all training missions they go up fully armed and ready for combat, because sometimes (or maybe oftentimes even for all I know) they get shot at while "training."

Also, unlike America, their country is constantly directly threatened by enemies lobbing bombs and so forth at them so they can get ordered at any time to go and attack said areas.

As for becoming a fighter pilot, it depends. The U.S. Air Force is the most difficult, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps you can get a guaranteed flight contract, but then it's up to you to get through flight school, and you could end up with anything from fighter planes to helicopters to C-130s to the big "jetliner" types of aircraft.

The U.S. Army also offers guaranteed flight school as well.

You do not need 20/20 vision for these, they will give you the corrective surgery if you need it.

If you are sincerely interested in becoming a U.S. Navy or Marine Corps pilot, check out www.airwarriors.com . They also have some info on U.S. Air Force and Army too.

I haven't a clue about about becoming a fighter pilot (or pilot overall) for the militaries of other nations though.




posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by Willard856
Wow, you guys are tough! If we had that rule, we'd probably lose 70% of our fighter guys over the age of 30.

Things may change Daedalus. India is usually fairly progressive in things like that. Do you know why they have such a hardline policy?


IMO Another reason:

The sheer applicant pool was/is so large that the IAF can afford to be highly selective in picking their candidates.
Its simple socio-math: The strata which ususally apply for such careers in the armed forces is absolutely massive in India and probably one of the highest in the world.
About 150-300 million individuals fall into the 'middle class' section, excluding the affluent class.
Actually its the same for most institutions in India: the competition is mind-boggling and ferocious, though the armed forces do offer one advantage over other public sector and educational institutions : no quota system based on social standing: Purely merit based..



posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 09:04 PM
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Yep, that is exactly why the glasses thing was here in Aus as well. But the US have found an interesting statistic. Since allowing pilots who have had corrective surgery, the pass rate for initial flight training and conversion has gone up (ie fewer scrubs). This impacts costs, as each student that fails is an investment gone bad, as fewer scrubs equals better value for money, as it cost millions to get someone their wings (yes yes Kurt, UAVs don't need pilots, so no cost etc etc I acknowledge this irrefutable point). So the inference is that countries that don't allow aircrew who have had corrective may be missing out on the best possible candidates.



posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 09:20 PM
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You might be surprised but some of the military pilots that I have met love to fly anything. They might fly fighters during the day but they also fly small private aircraft and homebuilt aircraft on the weekends. Thats how much they love to fly. You might do well to get flight training in anything you can. This will give you experience no matter what happens with your flying career. Also you are likely to bump into military pilots who can give you better advise than I can.



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 03:49 AM
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Originally posted by Willard856
So the inference is that countries that don't allow aircrew who have had corrective may be missing out on the best possible candidates.


I wholeheartedly second that!!!



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 03:21 PM
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I'm also wanting to be a fighter pilot. just recently i did a powerpoint presentation on the occupation of a fighter pilot and here is some info i found:


The military operates one of the largest fleets of specialized airplanes in the world. Supersonic fighters and bombers fly combat missions. Large transports carry troops and equipment. Intelligence gathering airplanes take photographs from high altitudes. Military airplane pilots fly the thousands of jet and propeller airplanes operated by the services.
Airplane pilots in the military perform some or all of the following duties:
• Check weather reports to learn about flying conditions
• Contact air traffic controllers to obtain take-off and landing instructions
• Develop flight plans showing air routes and schedules
• Fly airplanes by controlling engines, rudders, elevators, and other controls
• Monitor gauges and dials located on cockpit control panels
• Perform combat maneuvers, take photographs, transport equipment, and patrol areas to carry out flight missions
Airplane pilots must pass the most demanding physical test of any job in the military. To be accepted for pilot training, applicants must have 20/20 vision and be in top physical condition. They must have very good eye-hand coordination and have extremely quick reaction times to maneuver at high speeds.
A four-year college degree is normally required to enter this occupation. Although the military has many women pilots, specialties involving duty in combat airplanes are open only to men.
Helpful fields of study include physics and aerospace, electrical, or mechanical engineering. Helpful attributes include:
• Determination to complete a very demanding training program
• Self-confidence and ability to remain calm in stressful situations
• Strong desire to fly airplanes
To serve in the military, a person must be at least 17; the maximum age for enlistment varies. To enlist, a person must pass a physical exam and an aptitude test. An enlistee must also meet military standards of discipline and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien.
Pilot training is a two-year program covering one year each in initial and advanced training. Initial training includes time spent in flight simulators, classroom training, officer training, and basic flight training. Course content typically includes:
• Aircraft aerodynamics
• Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations
• Foul weather flying
• Jet and propeller engine operation
• Operation of aircraft navigation systems
This is among the most challenging training given by the services. Not everyone who attempts this training can meet the strict requirements for completion. Advanced training begins when pilots successfully complete initial training and are awarded their "wings." Advanced training consists of instruction in flying a particular type of aircraft.
To qualify for pilot training, you MUST:
* Have completed at least 90 semester credit hours.
* Complete your Bachelor Degree within five (5) years of your commissioning date.
* Have current distance vision of 20/70 or better, correctable to 20/20. Near vision of 20/20. If you have had eye surgery, it must have been completed more than a year ago with favorable results. If so, a waiver request may be submitted. Applicants who have had eye surgery within one (1) year of the date of the board will not be considered for the current year's board.
* Be qualified physically and mentally.
* Meet minimum scores on Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT).
* Have received test results from the Basic Attributes Test (BAT).
* Be not more than 30 years old when you start pilot training and/or have no more than five (5) years commissioned service time. (Please note that pilot training will begin approximately one and a half years - two years after the date of the board.)


I hope that helps. there is more stuff but i just picked out the important stuff.



Falcon out...



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by Falcon9021Although the military has many women pilots, specialties involving duty in combat airplanes are open only to men.


I don't know where you got that from
but it's wrong.


Woman pilot flying the most advanced bomber there is
the B2

userpages.aug.com...


Woman F16 pilot that flys SEAD missions


userpages.aug.com...

Woman A10 pilot who flew the famous damaged A10 back to base

userpages.aug.com...

findarticles.com...


there is also a Woman (Susan Sanson) who is Command Master Chief of a combat air squadron Sea Control Squadron 22 out of Cecil Field, Fl



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by warpboost
I don't know where you got that from
but it's wrong.



I got it from www.ecis.com and i to was thinking now wait a minute. I know there are women combat pilots i just met one not too long ago. Capt. Nicole Malachowski she's the right wing in the USAF thunderbirds and she was talking about the F-15 she flew before becoming a thunderbird.


Falcon out...



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by Falcon9021
I'm also wanting to be a fighter pilot. just recently i did a powerpoint presentation on the occupation of a fighter pilot and here is some info i found:


hey , that is a great summary FALCON , any chance you could upload the PPT file of your powerpoint show to a file hoster ?

PS - such demanding qualifications for fast jet qualification should be remembered , and repeated the next time some one makes the claim " bush is a dumbass " or other such comments



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 10:25 PM
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Originally posted by ignorant_ape
hey , that is a great summary FALCON , any chance you could upload the PPT file of your powerpoint show to a file hoster ?

PS - such demanding qualifications for fast jet qualification should be remembered , and repeated the next time some one makes the claim " bush is a dumbass " or other such comments


National Air Guard right?
How many hours did he clock?
Sorties?



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 10:45 PM
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Hey Daedalus,

Not sure if you've mentioned it before, and the recent posting on women fighter pilots has prompted me, but are there any gender limitation in the Indian Air Force with regards to fast jet flying?



posted on Dec, 7 2006 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by Willard856
Hey Daedalus,

Not sure if you've mentioned it before, and the recent posting on women fighter pilots has prompted me, but are there any gender limitation in the Indian Air Force with regards to fast jet flying?


I'm not sure but I think there are restrictions for fixed wing fighters especially in primary combat roles.
Helis and transport aren't a problem.
Although again helis in primary roles is a doubt. Mostly support Ops I think..
I'll check and let you know..



posted on Dec, 7 2006 @ 09:15 PM
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Actually, all most if not all of your questions can be answered here:

If you go through it you'll find out that most of what I said about eyesight etc is true..
There's a lot of other weird stuff as well.
As for women, well again what I said is more or less the scene.



posted on Dec, 7 2006 @ 09:29 PM
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Actually this is the main recruitment site.
Feel free to explore..



posted on Dec, 8 2006 @ 04:45 PM
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ill try to get my powerpoint on here, but im not promising anything.


Falcon out...



posted on Dec, 12 2006 @ 04:50 PM
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Small thing, no more BAT, now it's called TBAS, same test, different name. It's like playing a video game that tests reaction time.

[edit on 12-12-2006 by ug87]



posted on Dec, 13 2006 @ 03:03 AM
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You're only allowed to take the equivalent of this BAT/TBAS once in the IAF.
If you flunk it, you're never allowed to take it again..
ever!!

Its called PBAT..

And yes its a flight sim of sorts..

[edit on 13-12-2006 by Daedalus3]



posted on Dec, 17 2006 @ 08:26 AM
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This web site might be interesting to aspiring fighter pilots.

It points out the various pros and cons as well as how to apply.

www.becomefighterpilot.com...

You can sign up for free sample information.
FYI: I have no relationship with this product.



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by ShatteredSkies
 


My nephew is a Marine pilot. He was trained right alongside the Navy pilots and also had to pass and maintain his carrier qualifications. He flew the EA 6B Prowler over Afganistan and Iraq until his plane was grounded due to age. He is now a flight instructor in Pensacola..... Semper Fi!!!



posted on Sep, 12 2008 @ 08:39 PM
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What if you are working as a fighterpilot on land (rather then in the navy at sea) can you be slightly coulerblind?i mean i can see coulers fine but those dot tests are the trouble a few may get me. although i can can train my eyes to see if i get my freinds to trace it out then im fine..but if i dont look at it for a while i loose it again its kinda wierd... im only grade 11 (i know my writing is sloppy im in a hury!!) but thats how close i am to almost being okay (not color blind) do you think i can slip by...(in canada) i have 20/20 vision and i am getting 90s at average!

any awnser is a good one!

cheers to whoever can help me!!



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