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92 Year Old Woman Goes Out Shooting When Cops Kick Down the Door(Update)

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posted on Nov, 25 2006 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by Rasobasi420
at least her grandkids have something to brag about in a few years



Originally posted by Dr Love
I think it's kind of funny that Granny went out blastin'.



Originally posted by D4rk Kn1ght
made me do the nose milk spray dance all over my key board!


I'm truly disgusted at how people are finding humor in this. How on Earth you can find this funny is beyond me.


The fact of the matter is this incident is a result of failed policy - and zero respect, precaution and foresight shown by the police. As for the man who stated tear gas costs too much to be standard issue, I would like to have it explained why this is truly cost-prohibitive. Thanks.




posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by SteveR
As for the man who stated tear gas costs too much to be standard issue, I would like to have it explained why this is truly cost-prohibitive. Thanks.


i'm not that guy, but i'll answer: for the same reason that our skies are becoming more and more dangerous....because the current government cares more about the almighty dollar than about safety.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 11:14 AM
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Poor thang...


Granny was trying to protect herself. :shk:

I hope they dont throw a life sentence on her



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 09:24 PM
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It was said on the news today, by the Atlanta Police Chief that the drugs found in her home had been a small amount of marijuana. They didn't say exactly how much a "small" amount was, but they have confirmed it was there. Civil rights groups here want to now send a letter to Alberto Gonzales to provide an investigation into this matter.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by snafu7700

Originally posted by SteveR
As for the man who stated tear gas costs too much to be standard issue, I would like to have it explained why this is truly cost-prohibitive. Thanks.


i'm not that guy, but i'll answer: for the same reason that our skies are becoming more and more dangerous....because the current government cares more about the almighty dollar than about safety.


Now that I will agree with that, my department was given huge homeland security grants but the restrictions were servere, we couldnt buy things we needed we ended up bbuying an APC and a MCC but we need more NL's the only NL's we have are Clearout and a taser.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 09:49 PM
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"Another Marijuana-Related Death"


Originally posted by DJMessiah
It was said on the news today, by the Atlanta Police Chief that the drugs found in her home had been a small amount of marijuana.

You know, if cops weren't kicking in doors and killing people over this, it would be funny.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
"Another Marijuana-Related Death"


Originally posted by DJMessiah
It was said on the news today, by the Atlanta Police Chief that the drugs found in her home had been a small amount of marijuana.

You know, if cops weren't kicking in doors and killing people over this, it would be funny.



Thank you for lightening the mood for a moment.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 10:05 PM
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:shk:

The War on Drugs gets another notch in its belt, and I grow even more ashamed of this nation.

If we didn't have such insane laws against drugs, this incident never would have happened.

When will people decide they've had enough?



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 10:06 PM
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I Don't Support The War But I Support The Troops


Originally posted by JamesMcMahn
Thank you for lightening the mood for a moment.

For what it's worth, I don't blame cops for bad laws, but consider them victims of the War on Drugs like everyone else.

I'm somewhat "Pro-Cop", actually, and am on very good terms with the local constabulary.

I place the blame for these deaths squarely where it belongs: on the corrupt politicians who perpetuate the War on Drugs, benefit from it and are responsible for creating the richest and most powerful criminal empire in human history.

People can complain about the Patriot Act all they want.

Our rights died long before that, when this accursed war against the people of the United States began.

May Kathryn Johnston and all the people murdered in the name of "decency" rest in peace, and may those whose greed and corruption led their deaths rot in hell.

Just my tuppence.



posted on Nov, 26 2006 @ 10:25 PM
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For what it's worth, I don't blame cops for bad laws, but consider them victims of the War on Drugs like everyone else.


I've had the honor of befriending a fair number of cops (patrol officers, vice, a couple of detectives, and a statey) over the course of my professional career and in private life, and I've yet to meet ONE individual who believes in the WoD.

But, the simple fact is that without the WoD, many cops would find themselves out of work, not to mention prison employees and support personnel, lawyers, federal LEOs, and a whole host of other folks.

If we ever manage to solve this predicament presented by the WoD, we'll have a whole new crop of problems to deal with, I think. Don't get me wrong, the sooner we move on to new problems, the better.



Our rights died long before that, when this accursed war against the people of the United States began.


Well said.




May Kathryn Johnston and all the people murdered in the name of "decency" rest in peace, and may those whose greed and corruption led their deaths rot in hell.


Well, in my opinion, we're in Hell - this is it man. This is our reward. It could have been paradise, but we've corrupted it and we've got to suffer the consequences.

What is Hell, if not the poisoned ashes of a ruined paradise? We don't need an afterlife to pay for our sins, this life suffices.



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 11:16 AM
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More information in this case. The informant who claimed to have bought drugs at the house from a man named Sam has now retracted that claim - he says he was convinced to lie about the drug buy (presumably after things went bad). This reinforces the idea that the cops likely had the wrong house.



www.cnn.com...

In an interview with Atlanta's WAGA-TV, the informant said he had never been to Johnston's house.

"I'm telling them, I never went to the house," the informant told the station. "The police can't say I ever went to the house."

The informant then said police called him and told him "you need to cover our ass."


:shk:



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
If we didn't have such insane laws against drugs, this incident never would have happened.

Hmmm...Actually, there are a few people who have been medically prescribed to smoke "the herb" to treat glaucoma! It seems that the THC dilates the tiny blood vessels around the eyes & provides for better flow of blood-oxygen. People with a legal prescription could even "light one up" in a public resturaunt after a meal and not be arrested! Of course, the management is well within rights to ask that customer to leave...


Was there any information about the woman's medical history that may provide an answer why or how the Herb was found?

This could be a case of "grasping for straws," but the point being made here is that information such as this would probably not be included in any news media...After all, the news media is pretty notorious for either omitting some pertinent info or applying a certain "spin" on how the news reads: Some are more notorious than others, though.



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 12:08 PM
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Well, I personally don't begrudge her a little pot.

The fact that it's illegal in the first place displays a stunning disregard for logic and reason on the part of our legislators. Actually, that's not entirely true. It's logical from their perspective, just not from ours.

Consdering they work for us, I find the situation more than a little distressing.

That said, it's possible the drugs were planted in the first place. Check out the article I just posted, which states that drugs were never purchased at the home, and there may not even have been a man named Sam in the first place.

So, it's entirely possible that the cops planted a small quantity of drugs at the home in desperation, when they realized they had not only burst into the wrong home, but ended up shooting an innocent senior citizen.

This story just makes me so ill...



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 02:25 PM
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posted by Majic

For what it's worth, I don't blame cops for bad laws, but consider them victims of the War on Drugs like everyone else. I'm somewhat "Pro-Cop", actually, and am on very good terms with the local constabulary. . I place the blame for these deaths squarely where it belongs: on the corrupt politicians who perpetuate the War on Drugs, benefit from it and are responsible for creating the richest and most powerful criminal empire in human history. May all the people murdered in the name of "decency" rest in peace, and may those whose greed and corruption led their deaths rot in hell. Just my tuppence. [Edited by Don W]



You are right, Majic. No cop gets up in the AM and says to himself, “Who can I kill today?” Whether it be a drug bust gone sour as in Atlanta, or an undercover operation that escalated out of control as in Queens NYC. Cops are under constant pressure. How many good arrests this month? Record keeping is horrendous. And you are always in danger. I don’t know what NYC pays the survivors of a man or woman KIA, but I’m doubtful if it is close to being enough.

I don’t know if the old lady in Atlanta had MJ at home or not. Or if there was any there, whether it was hers and not one of her grandchildren’s. Or planted. We know some cops do plant evidence - OJ Simpson’s bloody sock - and we know it happened at least once in Illinois where 4 cops put a guy on death row. One of them had a conscience and ratted out the others. The loyalty to a fellow officer is understandable. Wrongly accused, fellow offices may be your only source of aid and comfort. And who is willing to risk his or her life for yours? Not that all cops would die for another any more than all college professors would offer their life for a student. And etc. The War of Drugs is a culture and it is a failure. When can we admit failure? Why not try a different approach? We can always go back to today’s failing system.


[edit on 11/28/2006 by donwhite]



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 03:48 PM
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This case in atlanta along with the one in NY is going to make some headlines for some time.

We even may see some changes about police procedures.

I hope it happens, because is making the police as a whole look very bad.

I always feel that some people in the police force may protect each other and lie when press to do it.



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 06:18 PM
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posted by marg6043

The Atlanta case along with NY is going to make headlines for some time. We may see some changes about police procedures. I hope it happens, because it’s making the whole police look very bad. I always feel that some people in the police force may protect each other and lie when pressed to do it. [Edited by Don W]



I suppose lying to cover mistakes and blunders is endemic to the job. This is not police only, but found in every bureaucratic institution. To our very serious disadvantage, almost all police departments now have a PIO - public information officer - and no other cop is allowed to speak to the press. This is “prior restraint” and means the public has fewer and fewer opportunities to learn about the internal workings or misdeeds of the police, and is very much contra-indicated for a real democracy. It is another name for "spin." I attribute this unhealthy development to the irresistible urge to privatize our governmental functions! Either to out-source it, or to make it look more like private industry.

The damnation of democracy!


Footnote.
The 1970s NYTimes case over the Pentagon Papers was a prior restraint case because Pres. Nixon wanted to see what was to be printed before it was put in the papers. He would censor the press. The court said NO. That did not mean there would not be responsibility and possible liability for what was printed , but in America, under the First Amendment, it had to be after the fact, and not before. But we protest not. Another freedom gone by the boards without a squeal.




[edit on 11/28/2006 by donwhite]



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 01:45 AM
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does i told you so sound harsh?


because thats what i said i suspected from the start. drugs planted to save "face".



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 02:18 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
More information in this case. The informant who claimed to have bought drugs at the house from a man named Sam has now retracted that claim - he says he was convinced to lie about the drug buy (presumably after things went bad). This reinforces the idea that the cops likely had the wrong house.



www.cnn.com...

In an interview with Atlanta's WAGA-TV, the informant said he had never been to Johnston's house.

"I'm telling them, I never went to the house," the informant told the station. "The police can't say I ever went to the house."

The informant then said police called him and told him "you need to cover our ass."


:shk:


Wow what a brave thing for the informant to do, step forward and tell how the police are trying to cover their butts in this case thus proving that they were wrong.

You know when they passed that law that the police could kick down your door and enter without identifying themselves someone on here predicted this kind of thing would happen.



posted on Nov, 29 2006 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by JamesMcMahn
Now that I will agree with that, my department was given huge homeland security grants but the restrictions were servere, we couldnt buy things we needed we ended up bbuying an APC and a MCC but we need more NL's the only NL's we have are Clearout and a taser.


Well after finding out you are PD, I dont find your avatar nearly as cute as I once did. Kinda speaks volumes. I hope you do not think it is you against the public. You dont need more of anything, you need better training and to grow some frickin manhood like the police used to have. Tasors are not being used instead of guns, they are used instead of muscle. I respect the PD, for I am with the FD and I work with you on different scenes, but holy christ will you guys stop worrying so much about yourselves and start thinking about the public you Protect and serve?


Originally posted by WyrdeOne
Well, I personally don't begrudge her a little pot.



That Baboon in your avvy is very satisfied looking! Love it. Reminds me of how I felt back when I smoked, well I still do but only right after exciting a structure fire.


Pot. All this over some smoke, and I am sure this is just a cover. We are becoming a nation of panzies, afraid of everything. What happened to the free and the brave?

Edit to add: I didnt read that little tidbit about the informant. I knew the PD were just covering behinds.

Semper if you are reading this it is not being addresed to fine officers like yourelf.



[edit on 29-11-2006 by LoneGunMan]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 03:56 PM
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posted by LoneGunMan



posted by JamesMcMahn

My department was given huge homeland security grants but the restrictions were severe, we couldn’t buy things we needed we ended up buying an APC and a MCC but we need more NL's the only NL's we have are Clearout and a taser.


Well after finding out you are PD, I don’t find your avatar nearly as cute as I once did. I hope you do not think it is you against the public. You don’t need more of anything, you need better training and to grow some manhood like the police used to have. Tasers are not being used instead of guns, they are used instead of muscle. I respect the PD, for I am with the FD and I work with you on different scenes, but holy christ will you guys stop worrying so much about yourselves and start thinking about the public you Protect and Serve? [Edited by Don W]



Sweet Jesus! This sounds like Shia and Sunni arguing in Baghdad! First, I am neither a cop nor a fireman. I have worked much more with police than with fireman in my 17 years in a lawyer’s office. It’s my opinion that police have the worse job of the two. I say this because firemen, whose jobs are hazardous, lend themselves to planning and employing equipment and practiced techniques. Further, fireman are never operating alone. And they always have senior and experienced supervisory staff at the scene. Dangerous, yes but not unpredictable.

Police on the other hand, are frequently alone, or in small units. Help is often many vital minutes away. Decisions must be made in a split second, only to be rehashed for weeks, months or years to come. In addition, police must deal with the sickly, the drunks, and the scum of the planet. I don’t know about today, but when I grew up in was the cops who cleaned the puke out of the back seat of the squad car. Exposed to HIV, hepatitis C and every other form of rotten disease. No way would I want to take on that thankless task if I was able to go back to my youth.

As to the “restrictions” placed on Homeland Security grants, that is one more form of EARMARKS practiced this time by the Executive Branch.

I do not know what the avatar JM has is or means.



[edit on 11/30/2006 by donwhite]



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