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Put a catalyst in the cylinder and win a prize

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posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 11:27 PM
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A catalytic converter in an automobile is used to help burn the unburned products of combustion in the exhaust.

A catalyst is an agent that facilitates in a chemical reaction but is not consumed in the reaction. This means that a fuel can burn at a lower temperature than the normal flash point.

My question for you is: Can you devise a way to incorporate a catalyst into the cylinder of an engine to facilitate the complete combustion of your fuel?

The prize is, yes there is a prize, you get a more fuel effecient car!!!




posted on Nov, 22 2006 @ 02:55 AM
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Not likely because combustion needs to happen very fast, putting a catalyst in the cylinder is not that realistic, I think the reaction rate would be slow. better would be to put the catalyst in the fuel (e.g. www.o2diesel.com...).



posted on Nov, 22 2006 @ 02:59 AM
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But wouldn't that produce an uneven effect? Injecting it along with air and gas would make sure the proportions are the same every time before it gets compressed and ignited.



posted on Nov, 22 2006 @ 04:34 AM
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Sorry Simon666.

Bang, bang
Miss, miss

1. The combustion need to happen relatively slowly, else you will get pinging.

2. You just pointed me to fuel oxygenating. Nothing to do with a catalyst.

Wiki quote:


The catalyst itself, most often a precious metal. Platinum is the most active catalyst and is widely used. However, it is not suitable for all applications because of unwanted additional reactions and/or cost. Palladium and rhodium are two other precious metals that are used. Rhodium is the material that makes a three-way reaction possible, while palladium is very popular as a substitute for platinum in three-way catalytic converters. Cerium, iron, manganese and nickel are also used, though each has its own limitations. Nickel is not legal for use in the European Union (due to nickel hydrate formation). While copper can be used, its use is illegal in North America due to the formation of dioxin.



Would you like to play again?



posted on Nov, 22 2006 @ 04:41 AM
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Hi there.

This actually is possible, but only if you apply it to a rotary engine.

Since there is constant pressure, a catalyst could be added to the chamber wall. I believe that the main issue with rotary engines is they tend to burn an awful lot of OIL so I think you may negate any positive effects the catalyst has, since the volume of exhaust is increased.

All the best,

NeoN HaZe.

Proud owner of a Mazda RX8



posted on Nov, 28 2006 @ 04:14 AM
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Originally posted by angryScientist
1. The combustion need to happen relatively slowly, else you will get pinging.

We're still talking about milliseconds and small surface area, aren't we?

[edit on 28-11-2006 by Simon666]



posted on Nov, 30 2006 @ 12:30 AM
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From Neon Haze:


This actually is possible, but only if you apply it to a rotary engine.

I'm sorry to say that I think it would be less of a possibility in a rotary engine than in a piston engine.
1. The chamber wall is a ware surface and thus needs to be covered in an oil film which would prevent the fuel air mixture from contacting it.



From Simon666:


We're still talking about milliseconds and small surface area, aren't we?

Yes we are.



That's the problem! The surface area. The air isn't going to flow past the surface. If it doesn't flow past the surface how is it going to come in contact with the catalyst?



I think I just beat myself in a debate. Man, I hate to loose.

Piston engines suck. I want a turbine engine in my car.



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