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Cotton Could Help Feed Hundreds Of Millions

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posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 08:15 PM
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A study done at Texas A and M University has managed to remove the toxic chemical from cottonseeds. This could turn an underused agricultural product into a food source for hundreds of millions of people. For every pound of cotton fiber the cotton plant produces one point six five pounds of seeds. The seeds contain twenty-one percent oil and twenty-three percent protein. Cotton seeds have been unfit for food because of the toxin they produce until now. The research team has found a way to engineer the cottonseeds so they produce very little of the toxin. About forty-four million metric tons of cottonseed are produced annually.
 



news.nationalgeographic.com
A toxic chemical has been mostly removed from cottonseeds, potentially turning an underused agricultural product into a food source for hundreds of millions of people, according to a new study.

"The world grows cotton for fiber not for seed," said Keerti Rathore, a researcher at Texas A&M University in College Station who helped spearhead the work.

"Few realize, however, that for every pound [0.45 kilogram] of cotton fiber, the cotton plant produces 1.65 pounds [0.75 kilogram] of seeds that contain 21 percent oil and 23 percent of a relatively good quality protein."




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Genetic engineering has been around for a while, and this does sound to be a good thing. Cotton is a crop that is commonly grown so adding another use for it, textile, and food, will make it a more valuable and useful crop. But then I can't help but think how the companies who control the food markets will react. Will they want another food crop on the market? Even it cotton does become a food crop the seeds will half to go through processing. Even after they do the raw protein will be little more then a paste. Should cotton become a more prevalent crop the extra money it generates will make it more difficult to make hemp a legal crop for textiles. The vigilance with which this is opposed will show weather or not those who control the markets will want to see this come to be.

Related News Links:
www.nature.com
lonestartimes.com
www.forbes.com
www.alertnet.org




posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 08:50 PM
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This is ridiculous.

We have a perfectly good edible plant seed, that beats the Hell out of cotton in every single way, and it's illegal.

I'm talking, of course, about hemp.

Legalize hemp, and you'll notice a difference in this country. Low cost food and energy never looked so good...

Why should we go to the trouble of making cotton seeds edible, when hemp seeds are already edible? (And more healthy by far 25-35% oil, 25% protein, and 30% carbohydrates)

It's a freakin' meal in a seed, okay? Hemp butter is yummy and nutritious.

The government is insane, period.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:13 PM
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I drive across southeast Georgia 4-5 times a year, from Milledgeville to Waycross. I notice a lot of cotton growing in the fields. But I also notice the fields are irrigated. Whether or not cotton could be useful as a food source would depend in large part on the amount of water it needs to grow compared to other crops like rice, wheat and corn that are presently the main cereal grains of the world. We need to know how much water it takes to grow a pound of cotton seed.

Cotton is one of the great achievements of mankind. The domestication of the cotton plant occurred about 5,000 years ago in 4 distant and unconnected places, at nearly the same time. Egypt. India. Mexico and Peru. It was the luxury cloth of the world until the 19th century. The equal to silk; in some ways its superior. Cotton was the foundation of the Industrial Revolution in Britain. It was the basis of wealth in pre-Civil War America. In 1860, cotton was the most valuable commodity in world trade. The Confederate States of America thought it would be so desired by the English and French they would recognize the CSA. They did not. Without recognition and its major ports blockaded, the South was broke, the war was lost.

For a great read and a very informative book, see: “Big Cotton: How A Humble Fiber Created Fortunes, Wrecked Civilizations, and Put America on the Map” by Stephen Yafa.


[edit on 11/20/2006 by donwhite]



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
This is ridiculous.

We have a perfectly good edible plant seed, that beats the Hell out of cotton in every single way, and it's illegal.

I'm talking, of course, about hemp.


yes I did menchen in the first post that this new use of cotton and the money it will generate will hasen further the use of Hemp in agracultcher.
Not that I ever really saw it beacomeing leagle any way.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
This is ridiculous.

We have a perfectly good edible plant seed, that beats the Hell out of cotton in every single way, and it's illegal.

I'm talking, of course, about hemp.


I don't disagree with you about hemp, but I don't see how that argument is related to this. Hemp will never replace cotton as a soft, comfortable fiber for clothing and linens. Hemp clothing etc. is made, but it feels no where near as nice as cotton.

Since the cotton will be grown anyway, it's best to get more use out of it.


MBF

posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:52 PM
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Cotton seed is already used as as cow feed. Have you ever tasted cotton? If you cut an unopened boll of cotton and suck on the lock of cotton inside, it is surprisingly sweet.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 10:10 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Hemp will never replace cotton as a soft, comfortable fiber for clothing and linens. Hemp clothing etc. is made, but it feels no where near as nice as cotton.


Hemp fibres can be woven as finely and feel as soft as cotton, be as warm as wool, and more durable...If you look hard enough you can find some really good hemp-fibre sweaters that you'll not know the difference without checking the label...problem is that due to a small demand, a sweater will cost you more than its cotton counter-part (but well worth the expense!)

Also, Hemp as a crop isn't as water-intensive as cotton, and needs little in the way of pesticides, so causing less nitrate pollution of rivers and water-sources.

That, as well as producing a naturally highly nutritious edible seed...a winner all round!



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 10:14 PM
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But isn'st that dangerous MBF? I mean the study says that it was toxic until recently when they figured out hwo to untoxify it. Have you ever had any wierd side effects or sickness after doing that?



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 10:30 PM
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What can one make from cotton seeds? I know there's cotton seed oil which is often used in cooking, but how will the solid part of the seed be used?



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by DJMessiah
What can one make from cotton seeds? I know there's cotton seed oil which is often used in cooking, but how will the solid part of the seed be used?


The story did say that there is a large amount of protien. I will half to guess that the process to extract the protien will make it something like a paste. So it will half to be processed into more pleaseing forms. Like an aditive to a sports drink, or an energy bar or something.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 10:55 PM
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I don't know about you guys, but I'm uncomfortable with the thought of ingesting something that "has to have the poison taken out" by some sort of chemical process.

Is there anything else we eat or drink that has to have toxins taken out of so it's edible?



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by elaine
I don't know about you guys, but I'm uncomfortable with the thought of ingesting something that "has to have the poison taken out" by some sort of chemical process.

Is there anything else we eat or drink that has to have toxins taken out of so it's edible?


Elaine
Its not a chemical process, it is a genetic engenering process. There is plenty of genetic engenered food on the market already. And some animals. In most cases I doubt most people know it is in there food. I am sory to say I dont know links to any pages that talk about how much of it is out there.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 11:10 PM
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Oh okay. I'm sorry I missed that.
Thanks for correcting me RedGolem. I guess the south will have even more cotton fields eventually if this does catch on then.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by elaine
I don't know about you guys, but I'm uncomfortable with the thought of ingesting something that "has to have the poison taken out" by some sort of chemical process.

Is there anything else we eat or drink that has to have toxins taken out of so it's edible?


Indeed. Cashews are very toxic if not boiled first. Tabaco too is toxic and must be soaked before use. Even the green stem from the top of a tomato plant is toxic if ingested accidentally.

[edit on 20-11-2006 by DJMessiah]



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 05:47 AM
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Originally posted by elaine
Oh okay. I'm sorry I missed that.
Thanks for correcting me RedGolem. I guess the south will have even more cotton fields eventually if this does catch on then.



Elaine,
No need to apoligise, I was just saying where I read the information. All the information I have on this topic came from the sorce article.
Thanks for your input.



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by DJMessiah

Indeed. Cashews are very toxic if not boiled first. Tabaco too is toxic and must be soaked before use. Even the green stem from the top of a tomato plant is toxic if ingested accidentally.

[edit on 20-11-2006 by DJMessiah]


Wow, well I am in big troble if one or two of those cashews slips through the system, I go through a lot of those



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by elaine
I don't know about you guys, but I'm uncomfortable with the thought of ingesting something that "has to have the poison taken out" by some sort of chemical process.

Is there anything else we eat or drink that has to have toxins taken out of so it's edible?


Castor Oil! From the Castor Bean plant, never eat the seeds (beans) because they contain Ricin, a poison without remedy ... dead within three days.



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 01:58 PM
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In RedGolem's original post it says they've engineered it to "produce very little of the toxin".

So there's still toxin in the cotton seeds right? So there might be long term effects they don't know about.

Anyone know the name of the toxin in cotton seeds?


MBF

posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 11:47 PM
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Originally posted by DYepes
But isn'st that dangerous MBF? I mean the study says that it was toxic until recently when they figured out hwo to untoxify it. Have you ever had any wierd side effects or sickness after doing that?


No, I never had any problem. I would just suck on the fiber part. It's sweet. The part that that they claim toxic is the seed. Still, you can injest some and not have any problems at all. Where you would have problems is if you injested a large amount of the seed. I have eaten some of the seed with no problems either.



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by elaine
Anyone know the name of the toxin in cotton seeds?


gossypol



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