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Torpedo Carrying Capacity

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posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 02:05 AM
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I'm composing a reference of sorts and was wondering if anyone here knows the exact number of torpedoes US subs can carry (LA, Sea Wolf, Virginia and Ohio)? I'm looking for both the maximum number and the typical load.


[edit on 20-11-2006 by WestPoint23]




posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 06:49 AM
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As i understood it max loadout for the us subs was:

LA class 26
Virginia class 38
Sea wolf 50

This is a mix of mk 48's and or tube launched tomahawks (mostly on the LA's as they have no vertical launch tubes)

I could not find any information on the ohio's

for more information on subs try
www.naval-technology.com...



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by paperplane_uk
As i understood it max loadout for the us subs was:

LA class 26
Virginia class 38
Sea wolf 50

This is a mix of mk 48's and or tube launched tomahawks (mostly on the LA's as they have no vertical launch tubes)

I could not find any information on the ohio's

for more information on subs try
www.naval-technology.com...


Your number for the Virginia class is to high.

The vertical launch Tomahawk system was able to free up much more space in the torpedo rooms for torpedo loadouts. As to which LA class ..and the loadouts it depends on where in the series the were built. The Vertical Lauch Tomahawk system came later in the LA series. The early models had no such system hence they took up much of thier natural load out in the torpedo rooms for Tomahawk...if this was in fact the mission load out. A small number of the early LA class boats are still in service.

I am not exactly sure about the Sea Wolf boats except to say that with two torpedo rooms thier load out is considerable and obviously more than the LA class and Virginias. As I recall the number of torpedo tubes on the Sea Wolf is eight. This is a considerable potential and also a very complex system to maintain.
Sea Wolf of course also has the vertical launch Tomahawk system.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 08:43 AM
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Are you sure about the viginia class. As a comparison the new UK astute class has a maximum capacity of 36 to 38 (depends who u ask) tube launched weapons (mix of spearfish, harpoon, tomahawk or mines)



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:01 AM
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Yes Sir,
I am sure of this. I do recall awhile back after reading one of your posts, I looked up the Astute class boats. I was surprised about the loadouts. I should go back and check out the hull diameter on the Astute class boats. I do know that the Sea Wolf has a large diameter hull. Pretty large around for a fast attack boat. I deduced that the Astute class boats have a torpedo room with a considerable size or the hull is bigger around...or both.

Remember also ..in a torpedo room we are talking also about handling equipment to safely move the weapons around. Large loadouts require extensive handling equipment. All of this fitting in to a compact space and still doing the job assigned. All of this being reflected in costs. And costs...or sticker sale costs/shock was one of the biggest complaints with the Sea Wolf class boats.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 09:11 AM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
Sea Wolf of course also has the vertical launch Tomahawk system.

Thanks,
Orangetom


You mean the Seawolf have the vertical launch system similar to the Los Angeles? I thought they took that out from the Seawolf, that the Seawolf can launch tomahawks from the torpedo tubes instead.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 11:32 AM
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From what I've been able to find the Ohio's (due to their mission) have a relatively small torpedo room with a carrying capacity of 12 ADCAP torpedoes. The LA boats also have a limited capacity of 24 Mk-48 (might be a bit more on the later VLS boats). The Virginia class have a capacity around 36 and the Sea Wolf around 48.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 12:10 PM
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No the Tomahawk vertical launch system appears to be a very sucessful system. The Navy and design yards were very concerned with the concept of limiting torpedo room loadouts due to carrying Tomahawk missles instead of torpedos.
The vertical launch system is what they came up with allowing mostly torpedos to be carried in the torpedo racks....full weapons loadouts. More flexability.
Mind you now..the vertical launch Tomahawk system is not inexpensive to construct or maintain..but it does offer needed flexability.

The success of this system has insured its survivability in the Los Angeles class, The Sea Wolfs and now the Virginia Class.

Also to West Point,

Yes...the boomers never did carry a large compliment of torpedos. Their primary mission was to stay undetected until time for launch of thier major payload. It was so even with the older class boomers for which the Ohios replaced.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 12:16 PM
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Well that answers my question, I thought it was expensive to have the vertical launch system on the Seawolf and that they cut that out. I know that it is a very successful system. I didn't see any pictures of the Seawolf with vertical launch system that we can easily see on the Los Angeles, just by the outllines on the hatches on the bow of the sub.



posted on Nov, 20 2006 @ 01:44 PM
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I also thought the SeaWolf had no VLS capability, I didn't know they had been retrofitted with one. Anyway, after some reading it appears that the Virginia class can only carry 26 or so Mk-48's plus 12 VLS Tomahawks



posted on Nov, 21 2006 @ 12:12 AM
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That number sounds about correct considering hull diameter and the size
21 inchs or 533mm of a modern torpedo.

As I stated in a previous post..you have a knack for ferreting out this information and pictures. Well done again.

Deltaboy,
Intresting that you seldom see any pictures of Sea Wolf in drydock or from the front end...except under way...with water washing over the bow. Not accidental.
Compare this to Virginia...Los Angeles.
Think about this.

By the way Gentlemen....considering non VLS Tomahawk boats. That picture of the USS San Francisco in drydock, the boat which a few years back hit the underwater mountain. This boat was built without VLS in the foreward ballast tanks. It would have been clearly visible ..the damage to the VLS tubes if it had in fact had VLS.
I am also not sure she would have made it back to port had she the added weight of the VLS tubes. It is a very heavy arrangement.
Undoubtedly someone in the Navy and design yards have reconsidered this angle as a result of this accident.

Thanks,
Orangetom





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