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Do kids learn about Tesla at school?

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CX

posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 01:27 PM
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This might sound a stupid thing to ask considering the way Nicola Tesla has shaped the world today, but are the kids taught about him at school?

I'm from the UK, and was always interested in science at school and studied it as well as i could. Yet apart from a Tesla coil, i honestly can't remember ever hearing about the guy at school.

Others i have asked have said the same too.

Is this the same in US schools, or indeed any international school? I know there is a lot of conspiracy theories surrounding Tesla and his work, but is his history brushed under the carpet more than deserved or should i have just listened better!


Thanks,

CX.




posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 01:30 PM
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There is no real mention of Tesla until a student gets to college and studies AC/DC. In grade school,as far as I am aware, children are taught that Thomas Edison did everything electrical.



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 01:30 PM
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Soory about the double post

[edit on 16-11-2006 by SpeakerofTruth]



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 05:31 PM
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Nope, schools don't teach about Tesla in Elementary, Middle or
High school.

There is'nt much of a need to, as most classes don't go into
subjects that he would be mentioned in.

U.S. History usually only goes up to the 1930's and does'nt
generally mention who invented what, it focuses more on
the sociopolitcal structure of America.

Since science classes generally don't work with electricity
and such there's no need to talk about him either.



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 05:35 PM
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I live in Canada and the only mention in school of him was in a unit on electricity in the 9th grade. It just mentioned his name.


CX

posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei

Since science classes generally don't work with electricity
and such there's no need to talk about him either.


Am i missing something here?


Since when does a science class generally not work with electricity?

CX.



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by CX

Originally posted by iori_komei

Since science classes generally don't work with electricity
and such there's no need to talk about him either.


Am i missing something here?


Since when does a science class generally not work with electricity?

CX.


Well there are different science classes, you have to take a few,
but there of different topics.

In my school there is an Earth sciences class, a biology class, and
a physics class, the Physics class is the only one that I could see
actually talking about electricity.

In general teaching the history of electricity is'nt science, explaining
how it works, which I was'nt taught at school is though.



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 06:41 PM
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It pisses me off that we don't teach about Tesla. We talk about Edison (Scoundrel) like we glorify Columbus (another scoundrel). Edison the great inventor...yeah right Edison was netorious for strealing intellectual property. Tesla invented modern day electricity-the AC current. And 9 of his patents can be found in Marconies Radio too. Without him we would have DC current for everything cars would need batteries to run thier lights as there would be no alternator maybe a bunk ass generator but man would that suck! We would have a electrical powerplant on every street block...a little unpracticle. The list could go on for a while if we were to seriously think where we would be without tesla. He deserves more credit than most who are given it in schools. Why do we celebrate Columbus again? just curious.



posted on Nov, 16 2006 @ 08:02 PM
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I did a degree in electrical engineering, and even there, I rarely heard about Tesla. He was mentioned maybe once in high school with regards to the unit of magnetic field strength named in his honour. During my university career, he was mentioned on occasion, primarily in my motors class, but also a few times elsewhere. Interestingly, he was not mentioned once in my third year 'history of technology' class that I took. I learned about Tesla mostly through self-directed reading. Many of my textbooks in science and engineering mentioned him, but our class time was devoted primarily to calculations and engineering concepts, rather than the history behind it all, so I did learn about him through some short biographical sections in a few of my books that way.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 01:17 PM
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I was fortunate enough to have a high school science teacher mention Tesla. Of course this particular lesson was not part of the curriculum. It's very rare to have public school teachers actually try to teach you something valuable that isn't state approved. And on another topic aside from education, I loved the fact that David Bowie acted as Tesla in 'The Prestige'.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 01:26 PM
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I remember in English, in 10th or 11th grade, we had to read a biography of any intellectual and write a paper on it. I read a biography of Tesla, I believe it was called "Tesla: Man out of Time," and was chastised by my teacher, because she did not view him as an intellectual. Despite the class enjoyed my presentation, I received a terrible grade for it, because typically I resorted to satire and said that simply because one is a scientist does not disqualify him from the realm of the intellectual. I guess not the best thing to say so an English professor.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 01:27 PM
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Yeah,I have a friend going into Biomedical technology,and I think he said they made mention of Tesla maybe once. I think it's sad that the man actually responsible for our electrical technologies is not given credit.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by BASSPLYRTesla invented modern day electricity-the AC current. And 9 of his patents can be found in Marconies Radio too. Without him we would have DC current for everything cars would need batteries to run thier lights as there would be no alternator maybe a bunk ass generator but man would that suck! We would have a electrical powerplant on every street block...a little unpracticle.

Tesla didn't invented the AC current and he didn't invented the alternator.

The fact that he was a great inventor is not an excuse to give him credit for things he did not invented.


And I also only heard about Tesla when I was in high-school, but that was because I had chosen a technical branch of high-school and I had electricity classes, where I saw the use of the Tesla as an unit for magnetic inductivity.

Unfortunately, I forgot all those formulas (we learned enough to make almost anything that could use electricity, even high-frequency transformers) some time ago, so I cannot make my Tesla coil like Silcone Synapse...



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by Baphomet79
I remember in English, in 10th or 11th grade, we had to read a biography of any intellectual and write a paper on it. I read a biography of Tesla, I believe it was called "Tesla: Man out of Time," and was chastised by my teacher, because she did not view him as an intellectual. Despite the class enjoyed my presentation, I received a terrible grade for it, because typically I resorted to satire and said that simply because one is a scientist does not disqualify him from the realm of the intellectual. I guess not the best thing to say so an English professor.


That teacher is incompetent and should be fired.

Their personal views and feelings of socialism have nothing to do with serious investigation and an organized presentation of facts.

I learned some time ago that the control system set out to destroy Tesla's reputation for two reasons: one he had advanced knowledge which they did not want the public to know about especially about generating energy and two he was from a part of the world that has for the most part been blacklisted in the west.

If you want to know why consider the immense reverence for which has been built up for Einstein in comparison. A man that knew a fraction of what Tesla did.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by denythestatusquo
Their personal views and feelings of socialism have nothing to do with serious investigation and an organized presentation of facts.


How do you get that the teacher was a scoialist out of that?
Baphomet79 did'nt even say the word socialist or socialism.

I don't know if you have a problem with Socialism or something,
but it's not a bad thing.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 05:50 PM
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Last summer when I was reading about the Tesla Roadster, I asked my son if he'd ever heard of him (Jr. in college). Nope.

BUT one of his friends, who had been home-schooled, had.

So some kids are learning more than the typical curriculum being taught in public schools.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
Tesla didn't invented the AC current and he didn't invented the alternator.

The fact that he was a great inventor is not an excuse to give him credit for things he did not invented.


Exactly. He was a great inventor, but let's not assign him stuff he didn't do.

There are many great scientists whose work was foundational in our modern society -- BUT -- they aren't mentioned much because science has gone beyond what they invented.

We don't hear about Edwin Howard Armstrong, for example, or Manfred von Ardanne (who had an equal or larger number of patents compared to Tesla and in an equally broad range of fields.)

Kids, frankly, don't want to have to learn the background stuff. They want to learn about modern inventions and devices. They'd rather learn about how the jet plane that they ride in works than learn about Bernoulli, Jatho, Stringfellow, and Dunont. It's all you can do to introduce them to the Wrights.

Tesla's work built on the work of others (William Stanley, Jr developed AC transmission) -- other scientists who ALSO are not studied.

I think folks would rebel if you tried to stuff that down their heads... and Tesla, while his work was monumental, has been surpassed. And the work that's been done since he died corrected some of his errors and has gone farther along the path than he was able to take it.

So we can start with Tesla and reinvent the wheel, or start with the current state of things and move forward from there.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei

Originally posted by denythestatusquo
Their personal views and feelings of socialism have nothing to do with serious investigation and an organized presentation of facts.


How do you get that the teacher was a scoialist out of that?
Baphomet79 did'nt even say the word socialist or socialism.

I don't know if you have a problem with Socialism or something,
but it's not a bad thing.


While I am not a Socialist, I do feel it has its purposes depending on the economy of certain countries in regards to their domestic progression. As stated by Iori, nothing I said had anything to do with Socialism. This was at a VERY conservative public high-school in Texas. My point was the opposite. The point was that an ignorant uber-conservative was completely aghast that I would use someone such as Tesla as an example of a revolutionary intellectual. Like many have previously said, if he didn't make the history books he isn't worth a thought.



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
How do you get that the teacher was a scoialist out of that?

I don't know if you have a problem with Socialism or something,
but it's not a bad thing.


Where are you China? Over here in North America it is well accepted that much of the educational system is biased towards socialism and practices social engineering on young people.

If you live in China then you have to defend your masters or else you would not even be able to get on the web.



[edit on 17-11-2006 by denythestatusquo]



posted on Nov, 17 2006 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Exactly. He was a great inventor, but let's not assign him stuff he didn't do.

There are many great scientists whose work was foundational in our modern society -- BUT -- they aren't mentioned much because science has gone beyond what they invented.

We don't hear about Edwin Howard Armstrong, for example, or Manfred von Ardanne (who had an equal or larger number of patents compared to Tesla and in an equally broad range of fields.)

Kids, frankly, don't want to have to learn the background stuff. They want to learn about modern inventions and devices. They'd rather learn about how the jet plane that they ride in works than learn about Bernoulli, Jatho, Stringfellow, and Dunont. It's all you can do to introduce them to the Wrights.

Tesla's work built on the work of others (William Stanley, Jr developed AC transmission) -- other scientists who ALSO are not studied.

I think folks would rebel if you tried to stuff that down their heads... and Tesla, while his work was monumental, has been surpassed. And the work that's been done since he died corrected some of his errors and has gone farther along the path than he was able to take it.

So we can start with Tesla and reinvent the wheel, or start with the current state of things and move forward from there.


This is how I see it:

Are you an expert on all of Tesla's work?
Name one scientist whose work is more advanced or less understood TODAY than Tesla's and NOT GIVEN credit for it?
The scientists you mention do not even come close to the body of work of Tesla.
Education has NOTHING to do with what KIDS want to learn. It has to do with what the system wants them to know.
Many areas Tesla worked in had little to no background from prior work of others.
Tesla's work has NOT been surpassed because a: most people even in academia do NOT know much of what he was working on and much of his work has not been developed as of YET. Futhermore, a good percentage of his work is still not understood.

I think the real story on Tesla is as I had already mentioned: One the military loves his work and behind closed doors he is greatly revered with "GRADE A" intellectuals (look up James McCanney for definition of terms). Secondly, Tesla being a Serb was not someone that the Jewish academic world, media and government controlled bureaucracy wanted to promote and instead others like Einstein were build up to gigantic proportions for their own edification. The idea that people of Einsteins background are superior intellects was the desired outcome as one example.



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