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War vets urged to wear medals on V-Day

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posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 12:24 AM
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Veterans have always worn their ribbons on various occasions commemorating Veterans' Day ceremonies, but this is the first time that I have heard of the DVA actually sanctioning the wearing of ribbons and medals throughout the Veterans Day, including work activities.

I'm not sure I'll do this because of the nature of the work I do, but it will be interesting to see if veterans take the lead and follow through.



Military veterans display their medals and service ribbons all day once a year in Australia. It’s a tradition that Veterans Affairs Secretary Jim Nicholson would like to import to the U.S.

Nicholson is asking America’s veterans to wear their medals and service ribbons on their civilian clothes all day on Veterans Day this Saturday, not just when they appear in uniform or participate in Veterans Day events.

The secretary said he wants to give veterans license to express more pride in their military service, and not to feel it’s bragging to show their medals and ribbons. It also may foster more open conversations with families and friends about military service, he said.

As a Vietnam veteran who once avoided calling attention to his service, Nicholson said he wants to make sure today’s veterans can keep enjoying high levels of popular support. In recent weeks he has been asking veterans groups to encourage the show of pride and service.

www.msnbc.msn.com...




posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 12:36 AM
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I think it's a great idea. I usually wear mine when attending funeral services for fellow vets or when I make a pilgimage to "The Wall". I hope I can find them; I moved recently, so I'll have to do a search around the new place. I'd hate to have to replace them.

HAve a good day, tomorrow, Grady and even though this may be kind of belated: Welcome Home.



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 12:44 AM
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How about wearing them right here? Like the article says it's not bragging, I'm just always the first to expose my contradictory nature...


GWV against the Iraq war, the gubernment, and...what else ya got?



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 11:47 AM
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Here are mine. Not many but I am proud to have earned every one.

[edit on 11/11/2006 by Stormrider]


[edit on 11/11/2006 by Stormrider]

[edit on 11/11/2006 by Stormrider]



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by Stormrider
HAve a good day, tomorrow, Grady and even though this may be kind of belated: Welcome Home.


Thanks, Stormrider.

You should check with with your service branch headquarters about your awards to see if you rate more. Not that it's such a big deal, but folks who served only a short time for whatever reason, may have been discharged before some of their unit awards and such were approved.

Two of the unit awards I now display were not approved until after my release from active duty.



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by Stormrider
HAve a good day, tomorrow, Grady and even though this may be kind of belated: Welcome Home.


Thanks, Stormrider.

You should check with with your service branch headquarters about your awards to see if you rate more. Not that it's such a big deal, but folks who served only a short time for whatever reason, may have been discharged before some of their unit awards and such were approved.

Two of the unit awards I now display were not approved until after my release from active duty.


Thanks for the info, Grady, I'll check into it; I do believe that we were up for a Presiential unit citation, come to think of it.



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 10:07 PM
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I actually heard about this from my wife this morning. She saw it on MSN or yahoo. First time i've ever heard about DVA (DOD too) sanctioning thise. I didn't wear mine, not to much to wear (2 AAM's, good conduct, fruit of the loom, and national defense medal). Most vets (myself included) wouldn't do this for a variety of reasons. Setting up a Class A was never one of my favorite things to do as a soldier. The regs are exacting and the cut of the uniform works against you, and it's reall easy to look like doo-doo if you don't take the time to doit right.

I wonder if various government agencies are sponsoring this as a morale boost type thing for the troops stateside to see all those who haves served.



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 10:32 PM
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I think it's a good idea, because I think that it supports the troops and shows some semblance of unity among veterans in honor of all those who have ever served.

I didn't wear my ribbons today, because, believe it or not, I'm a busboy in a restaurant and I don't want my rack to smell like salsa.

But wearing a full rack of ribbons is not necessary. One could wear a cloisonné ribbon or even one of the little cloisonné medals that are available on many of the sites that cater to veterans.

Had I something suitable, I certainly would have worn it today to say to the world that, yes, I am a veteran and I am proud of my service and the service of those who served before me, with me, and forever more.

In the future, I will make sure that I have something to wear on Veterans' Day, regardless of my activities.

www.grunt.com...

[edit on 2006/11/11 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 10:36 PM
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Whether you wore your ribbons today or not, I hope each and every one of you veterans had a wonderful day. Our little town was filled with the military songs being played on the church bells all day today, and it made me feel very special inside.

A most respectful Veteran's day to all of you.



posted on Nov, 11 2006 @ 10:40 PM
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Thanks, Valhall. I'm sure all the veterans here are grateful for your support and the support of a nation.



posted on Nov, 12 2006 @ 01:07 AM
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Thanks Valhall for the kind words. It is an especially poignant day for me as my father died on Veterans Day, 2 years ago, and he was a veteran too; he served in China and Korea and was my inspiration for joining the military at a time, (1969), when that was not the most popular thing to do. I wish he were here to share the day with me and in a way he was.



posted on Nov, 12 2006 @ 01:34 AM
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Vetrans day has always been a very emotional day for me because of all of the friends and family that have served and died for our country. I watched the HBO special called Last Letters Home today and man I will tell you that was hard to watch but I would like every last man woman and child to see what the price of freedom has been in our country. These stories are the same for every war ever fought for our great nation be it today or 1776.
www.hbo.com...

I would also like to share a story with you of a man that I am very proud to say I know and is one of the greatest men you could ever meet to this day because of his continued inspiration and leadership. To sit and listen to his stories for even a few hours will change most peoples views of what being a American is about and how we no longer understand what we have in this country. This is the story of his Medal Of Honor.

INGMAN, EINAR H., JR.

Rank and organization: Sergeant (then Cpl.), U.S. Army, Company E, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Maltari, Korea, 26 February 1951. Entered service at: Tomahawk, Wis. Born: 6 October 1929, Milwaukee, Wis. G.O. No.: 68, 2 August 1951. Citation: Sgt. Ingman, a member of Company E, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. The 2 leading squads of the assault platoon of his company, while attacking a strongly fortified ridge held by the enemy, were pinned down by withering fire and both squad leaders and several men were wounded. Cpl. Ingman assumed command, reorganized and combined the 2 squads, then moved from 1 position to another, designating fields of fire and giving advice and encouragement to the men. Locating an enemy machine gun position that was raking his men with devastating fire he charged it alone, threw a grenade into the position, and killed the remaining crew with rifle fire. Another enemy machine gun opened fire approximately 15 yards away and inflicted additional casualties to the group and stopped the attack. When Cpl. Ingman charged the second position he was hit by grenade fragments and a hail of fire which seriously wounded him about the face and neck and knocked him to the ground. With incredible courage and stamina, he arose instantly and, using only his rifle, killed the entire guncrew before falling unconscious from his wounds. As a result of the singular action by Cpl. Ingman the defense of the enemy was broken, his squad secured its objective, and more than 100 hostile troops abandoned their weapons and fled in disorganized retreat. Cpl. Ingman's indomitable courage, extraordinary heroism, and superb leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the infantry and the U.S. Army.
www.army.mil...

[edit on 12-11-2006 by factfinder38]



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