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The three Wise Men and the baby Jesus

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posted on Nov, 8 2006 @ 06:35 PM
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The symbology of the three wise man has me wondering.........

First I find it odd that the wise men were Magi from Persia, This seems strange for a Christian messiah.

The gifts of Frankensense, Gold, and Myrrh are also baffling.

Gold symbolizes perfect Alchemy, does it not?

Myrrh was referenced as made from the ashes of the Pheonix, transformation.

And I don't know about Frankensense or even why insence burning is so frequently mentioned as bieng burnt as a gift to the Gods.

It makes me wonder what is really being communicated. Does anyone care to help me understand these questions?




posted on Nov, 9 2006 @ 07:46 PM
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Well, apparantly no one here is interested in this topic, but I will add that when I mentioned this to a friend he responded with one question that pretty much answered my question.

His question was "Was Jesus a Christian?"

Anyway...........



posted on Nov, 9 2006 @ 08:29 PM
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I think they gave Frankensense and Myrrh because they are for clearing negativity. At one time they were worht as much as gold, and back then they were rare and expensive. They are burned in relation to the Gods because it clears negativity from the self in preperation for evoking the Gods presence for comunion.

As to whether Jesus was the Christ is up for debate. I have heard people state that he is Hindu and some think he is Buddist. I think him and Mary high tailed it to India and lived happily ever after.



posted on Nov, 9 2006 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by interestedalways
The symbology of the three wise man has me wondering.........

First I find it odd that the wise men were Magi from Persia, This seems strange for a Christian messiah.


Never stated in the Bible (they're "from the East)... the persian affiliation is something added much later:
en.wikipedia.org...


The gifts of Frankensense, Gold, and Myrrh are also baffling.

It's much older than the alchemical references you're suggesting... and the meaning has actually been preserved in Christian liturgical references.

Longfellow's poem, "The Three Kings" gives the traditional understanding of the gifts:
"They laid their offerings at his feet;
The gold was their tribute to a King,
The frankincense, with its odor sweet,
Was for the Priest, the Paraclete,
The myrrh for the body's burying."

This is echoed in the carol, "We Three Kings"...
www.cyberhymnal.org...



[edit on 9-11-2006 by Byrd]



posted on Nov, 10 2006 @ 12:30 PM
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The Magi (singular Magus, from Latin, via Greek μάγος ; Old English: Mage; from Old Persian maguš) was a tribe from ancient Media, who - prior to the absorption of the Medes into the Persian Empire in 550 BC - were responsible for religious and funerary practices. Later they accepted the Zoroastrian religion, however, not without changing the original message of its founder, Zarathustra (Zoroaster), to what is today known as "Zurvanism", which would become the predominant form of Zoroastrianism during the Sassanid era (AD 226–650). No traces of Zurvanism exist beyond the 10th century.

The best known Magi are the "Wise Men from the East" in the Bible, whose graves Marco Polo claimed to have seen in what is today the district of Saveh, in Tehran, Iran. In English, the term may refer to a shaman, sorcerer, or wizard; it is the origin of the English words magic and magician.


source en.wikipedia.org...

They could be a representation of the Trinity. They cold also be a representation of divine Magick. They more than likely were not even flesh and blood men but a metaphor. The trinity as in "Youth, Father, Sage" Female version "Maiden, Mother, Crone" Christain version "Father Son and the Holy Ghost"



posted on Nov, 10 2006 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd



The gifts of Frankensense, Gold, and Myrrh are also baffling.

It's much older than the alchemical references you're suggesting... and the meaning has actually been preserved in Christian liturgical references.

The myrrh for the body's burying."

OK, the myrrh for the body's burying. This does fit with the phrase that says the ashes of the Pheonix was turned into an egg of Myrrh. To me this is an obvious reference of rebirth. Why else was Myrrh used to bury the body?

This is a conspiracy site, why does Deny Ignorance mean to invalidate any ideas that aren't backed up with a source? If you don't explore ideas you will stay stuck in your box.



posted on Nov, 10 2006 @ 09:15 PM
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The scripture does not say that there are three kings (wise men; magi), but does limit the discription of the gifts to three, from which the assumption of three kings is presumably taken. The very limited description is in Matthew:2.




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