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GM or Not to GM, Which?

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posted on Dec, 20 2006 @ 09:24 AM
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Food for thought, and more data for the pot.

About e. coli and genetically engineered artificial e. coli:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

continued...

www.abovetopsecret.com...


Please read - it's relevant, and very important.


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posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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China may be growing GM but Thailand has resisted despite "sanctions" threats. The Jasmine or perfumed rice from Thailand it the best flavored and textured in the world. I buy a big bag of it every year and this year there is less making it to the US. I can only hope if the US prohibits Thailand rice that I'll be able to order it online. I already do that with potatoes and popcorn. I'm 65 and remember what real food tasted and felt like. I save seeds from heirlooms and plant them every year; I only shop at organic grocers.
I can only hope those "chem-trails" aren't GMing our whole land.
This is freedom? Like in Britain, produce etc. should be labeled so we can choose. This is being forced on us and we are kept from information we need.
It's about money and monopoly.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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i'll resurrect this thread since it does contain a lot of references already.

Looking at the following excerpt

Source: PNAS


Despite widespread adoption of genetically modified crops in many countries, heated controversies about their advantages and disadvantages continue. Especially for developing countries, there are concerns that genetically modified crops fail to benefit smallholder farmers and contribute to social and economic hardship. Many economic studies contradict this view, but most of them look at short-term impacts only, so that uncertainty about longer-term effects prevails. We address this shortcoming by analyzing economic impacts and impact dynamics of Bt cotton in India. Building on unique panel data collected between 2002 and 2008, and controlling for nonrandom selection bias in technology adoption, we show that Bt has caused a 24% increase in cotton yield per acre through reduced pest damage and a 50% gain in cotton profit among smallholders. These benefits are stable; there are even indications that they have increased over time. We further show that Bt cotton adoption has raised consumption expenditures, a common measure of household living standard, by 18% during the 2006–2008 period. We conclude that Bt cotton has created large and sustainable benefits, which contribute to positive economic and social development in India.


one can find one of the precious few instances where increases in yield have been reported along with other benefits like reduced pesticide consumption (which will at least partially offset seed costs). the question now is, imho, how non-GMO varieties performed during that timeframe.



 
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