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F22 help wanted

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posted on Nov, 2 2006 @ 07:43 AM
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I am looking for some real knowledge, not speculation here.
Anybody have any idea how the thrust vectoring works on the Raptor?
Let me clarify what I mean first. I know how it works in practice, BUT:
Are the controls for the vectoring integrated into the throttle and therefore into the aircraft/computer systems?
OR, does the pilot have a separate control system to maneuver the nozzles?
Basically I am assuming it is an integrated system, sort of like the fly-by-wire systems, or a separate control...just seems like the pilot would have his/her hands very full with an extra system to manipulate.
This platform can do some pretty wild maneuvers, just curious how the controls work a bit more?




posted on Nov, 2 2006 @ 10:56 AM
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OK, maybe my post was a bit confusing when I read it again, but seriously???
I have read before posting for quite some time and I have quite a bit of respect for a few of the aircraft enthusiasts on this site! I have quite a bit of knowledge and personal experience with the F 18 Hornet and others from my own background, but there must be some thoughts on the Raptor from this site!
I once read a reply to the F 16's engine noise at Nellis...the response from somebody who had extensive hours in 15's and 16's gave a great reason for the airflow and manipulation of the throttles..where are you now? Help me Obi Wan, you may be my only hope!

Thanks for reading..sorry for the impatience....I just know somebody can help my curiosity!



posted on Nov, 2 2006 @ 04:32 PM
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The nozzels are integrated into the FBW system. They move in conjunction with the tailplanes and move pretty much all the time except when the computer senses that weight is on the landing gear.



posted on Nov, 2 2006 @ 05:04 PM
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OK, thanks! So the pilot has basically the same HOTAS as let's say the F 16? The nozzles are integrated and then the aircraft imputs whatever degree of thrust vectoring is needed to accomplish that maneuver?
How do you know this by the way, just curious???

I appreciate your response very much, just looking for clarity more than speculation...no offense intended at all!!!



posted on Nov, 3 2006 @ 01:58 AM
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Off topic, well kinda.

You should get a simulator called X-Plane. You can fly the F-22, and thrust vectoring actually vectors the thrust. Amazing since you can do 5 flips at 10 knots
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posted on Nov, 3 2006 @ 04:14 AM
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Originally posted by Mondogiwa
OK, thanks! So the pilot has basically the same HOTAS as let's say the F 16? The nozzles are integrated and then the aircraft imputs whatever degree of thrust vectoring is needed to accomplish that maneuver?
How do you know this by the way, just curious???

I appreciate your response very much, just looking for clarity more than speculation...no offense intended at all!!!


Depends on the flight regime [at supersonic speeds, I've been told the TVC is only used to trim the aircraft] and the elevators provide the pitching moment.


But as regards integration into the flight system, its completely autonomous - the pilot doesn't have to worry about it.



posted on Nov, 3 2006 @ 08:29 AM
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kilcoo316,
thanks for the response! May I ask your area of expertise? No offense intended in any way, actually quite the opposite!

I have looked at a few of your other posts and we do in fact share some thouhts!
My main reason for the F 22 question was to understand the pilot's workload, and then secondly, to determine if the maneuvers that can be achieved are due to the pilot's expertise in manipulating those controls..OR..if the aircraft is virually autonomous via the FBW system!



posted on Nov, 3 2006 @ 09:33 AM
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The F-22 is designed with carefree handling, basically, its impossible for the pilot to loose control.

In older designs, if the aircraft stalls, the pilot would experience losses of control to varying degrees in stall, spins etc - but with the F-22 the aircraft is always responsive to the pilots inputs.

It removes another complication from the pilot's mind, allowing them to focus on the sky around them rather than flying the aircraft.


A monkey could probably extract 95% of the F-22's flight performance, the other 5% takes training. However, a monkey could not maintain situational awareness and fight at the same time.



I'm just a lowly CFD/aerodynamics worker-bee [well.... with less emphasis on the work
]




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