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The Black Alchemist by Andrew Collins

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JAK

posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 12:46 PM
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I was talking to a friend today and ended up mentioning this book, 'The Black Alchemist'. It's been a good few years (decades?) since I read it (I might give it another peek soon) but I do remember thinking it was the spookiest thing I had ever read. I lent it to a friend and he was of the same opinion.

Here's the back cover:

    The Red Pill

    The Black Alchemist is a psychic questing book by author and researcher Andrew Collins.

    The description on the back of the book reads:

    "The Black Alchemist is not just based on fact - it is a very real account of very real events.

    The story begins in May 1985 when a powerful vision leads the author and his psychic colleague to uncover an inscribed stone spearhead buried as part of a warped occult ritual.

    Removing this strange artefact opens up a direct link with its maker - a lone figure practising a debased and very corrupt form of black alchemy, unused for nearly two thousand years.

    Fresh visions and haunting dreams direct the pair to further desecrated holy places and more concealed artefacts, unaware that their adversary is now hunting them.. and getting closer.

    Soon afterwards the confrontations begin - supernatural confrontations resulting in some of the most disturbing displays of psychic powers ever recorded.

    Arcane magic, modern-day sorcery and dark forces combine together as the author and the psychic attempt to unmask their adversary.

    Then, during the early hours of Friday, 16 October 1987 - as Southern Britain is hit by a hurricane of awesome strength - individuals across the country experience the same nightmare. One single vision that reveals the hidden secrets of the hurricane and the true, unequalled power of The Black Alchemist."


Has anyone here read or heard of it? If so what did you make of it, is it believeable?


    Black Alchemist

    The books enjoy a huge cult reputation and even nearly two decades on, a frenzied debate on who the actual Black Alchemist might have been, with Collins's friend and colleague David Southwell even claiming that he is now dead, his ashes scattered in a rose garden in the churchyard at Seddlescombe in Sussex. Many who have tried to expose the Black Alchemist as a hoax have ended up concluding that Collins is telling the truth.


Jak




posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 02:04 PM
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posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 08:13 PM
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Perhaps one would want to get to know the workings of White Alchemy(AL or EL's Khem-istry) first?

Reading about Black Alchemy first, may subject one's mind to negative vibrations that influence one's mind without our Conscious perception of it.

To read something such as "The Satanic Bible" for example, and not have a solid foundation in guarding one's body, speech and mind, would be like entering a cave without a torch.

I wouldn't recommend it at all actually, as authors of the Right Hand and Middle Paths are good at giving us enough knowledge of the left hand path(for the sake of 'self' defense) without subjecting our minds to dangerous influences.


Alchemy is the most potent of Sciences(whether White of Black), and the most potent of Black Magic works from the mental plane...


With all this in mind...



White Alchemists:


Samael Aun Weor

William Blake

Robert Burton

Geber

Ghayat al Hakim

Manly P. Hall

Paracelsus

Nicholas Flamel

Robert Fludd

Fulcanelli

Basil Valentine

Goethe

Athanasius Kircher

Eliphas Levi

Raymond Lully

Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Philalethes

The Rasail Ikhwan as-Safa

Thabit Ibn Qurra

Roger Bacon

St. Germain

Cagliostro

Ibn Wahshiya



Just to name a few that I've come across in my researches.

There are many others from the Platonist and Hermetic traditions I didn't mention as well(search Thomas Taylor at PRS.org or Kessingerpub.com)



Just some general advice in regard to this topic.


Back to the specific topic at hand...





Regards




[edit on 25-10-2006 by Tamahu]



posted on Sep, 3 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by JAK
 


This cult is still practising. Still butchering animals, ritually, especially at this time of year (but the press won't report it). They are known as the Friends of Hecate. They were set up by that dark, dark figure (and blood-liner, through-and-through - his family is a political dynasty - and Hitler appeaser, during the war), whom Churchill described as one who 'gives sodomy a bad name', Lord Hailsham, when he was Lord Chancellor. There are strange lights and noises that come from that wood, as though UFOs might have something to do with it. I have my theories about what it's about.
There is a group of people who monitor the woods - Clapham and Patching woods very thoroughly, determined ultimately to expose them.
I grew up near the tiny hamlet of Clapham. The parish is called Clapham and Patching, Patching being even smaller - perhaps a few dozen people live there. However, Peter Carroll, who wrote a seminal work on the occult, was born in that parish. Suffice to say that the story, here, is far from over. Another book on the subject - featuring the strange and possibly ritualistic spate of human and animal disappearances in the woods in the late 1970's and early 1980's is The Demonic Connection by Toyne Newton and Charles Walker.
The woods are truly, truly enchanting. (The sacred tree, where the cult worships, always has signs of their practices [once, four cats heads were found, having been used as candle-stick holders] at its foot.) But along has come Agenda 21 and now they are all being cleared for development.
My feeling is that there is something key, about the communing that goes on here, to what is going on in the world now.
Sussex is reckoned by some to be the darkest (and also for some, the most beautiful - and now, threatened) county of mainland England, the last to convert to Christianity.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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BoredCollie
reply to post by JAK
 


This cult is still practising. Still butchering animals, ritually, especially at this time of year (but the press won't report it). They are known as the Friends of Hecate. They were set up by that dark, dark figure (and blood-liner, through-and-through - his family is a political dynasty - and Hitler appeaser, during the war), whom Churchill described as one who 'gives sodomy a bad name', Lord Hailsham, when he was Lord Chancellor. There are strange lights and noises that come from that wood, as though UFOs might have something to do with it. I have my theories about what it's about.
There is a group of people who monitor the woods - Clapham and Patching woods very thoroughly, determined ultimately to expose them.
I grew up near the tiny hamlet of Clapham. The parish is called Clapham and Patching, Patching being even smaller - perhaps a few dozen people live there. However, Peter Carroll, who wrote a seminal work on the occult, was born in that parish. Suffice to say that the story, here, is far from over. Another book on the subject - featuring the strange and possibly ritualistic spate of human and animal disappearances in the woods in the late 1970's and early 1980's is The Demonic Connection by Toyne Newton and Charles Walker.
The woods are truly, truly enchanting. (The sacred tree, where the cult worships, always has signs of their practices [once, four cats heads were found, having been used as candle-stick holders] at its foot.) But along has come Agenda 21 and now they are all being cleared for development.
My feeling is that there is something key, about the communing that goes on here, to what is going on in the world now.
Sussex is reckoned by some to be the darkest (and also for some, the most beautiful - and now, threatened) county of mainland England, the last to convert to Christianity.


Sorry to say I made some errors in this account.
It wasn't Hailsham whom Churchill described as one who 'gives sodomy a bad name', but Tom Driberg. The Friends of Hecate are a completely separate cult from the cult surrounding the Black Alchemist, and there is reckoned to be no link between the two. I have no substantial grounds for suggesting (implicitly, if one can indeed take my words to imply as much) some link between the cult mentioned and Peter Carroll, or strong grounds for any suggestion that the press wouldn't, in principle, report wrong-doings.
The Friends of Hecate, however, are well worth investigating.



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by BoredCollie
 


Also, FoH was actually set up in 1948(-ish?), in Clapham wood.




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