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NEW FRUIT scientific discovery or not

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posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:24 PM
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A while ago, I had this apple tree in my front yard and a cherry tree in my back yard. Over time the bees spread the apple DNA (or whatever it is) to the cherry tree. Now I have a apple+cherry tree. It takes the appearance of an cherry on the outside but when you cut it in half, its an apple! I wonder if this has happened before but if it has not, (keeping an open mind) then maybe this fruit carries some sort of curing substance.




posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:31 PM
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Thats really interesting. But I doubt it contains anything that can cure a disease but maybe I'm wrong.

The question is, how does it taste?



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:40 PM
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I am being a little cautious about eating it regardless of my thought of it may be containing a curing substance.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:44 PM
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Also maybe it can lead to a way of growing foods on other planets. Or a new way of making candy without the unhealthy ingredients by using actual fruit.

All you need is two different types of fruit plants and yellow jackets or sweat bees. I think its those bees because during the spring and summer those are the only bees I see swarming on the fruit. I'm pretty sure they are yellow jackets but if not, here is a start, they are yellow and black.

[edit on 22-10-2006 by wildcat]



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:54 PM
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Pretty cool! I never knew that it could happen like that, makes it seem so darn easy.

I'm gonna make a potato bean! Or..............not.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by Zanzibar
Pretty cool! I never knew that it could happen like that, makes it seem so darn easy.

I'm gonna make a potato bean! Or..............not.


Its all based on the bees will



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:09 PM
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Or you can make a room with two plants you wish to fuse and put a bee hive in there.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by wildcat
It takes the appearance of an cherry on the outside but when you cut it in half, its an apple!

Are you certain it's not a crabapple? The apples are about the size of cherries I guess [very sour though]. I hope I'm wrong.. it'd be kind of cool for you to have a tree named after you.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:15 PM
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They could be crab apples, but they must of became crab apples I guess.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:15 PM
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Please do correct me if I am wrong.

An apple tree spreads its "dna" through the apple it's self no? .. that is to say the apple falls from the tree in hopes an animal eats it and scatters the seeds or that it may decay and be burried within some kind of furtile soil to spread more apple trees.

A cherry tree works exactly the same way.

A bee in no way helps spread polination of a tree. Flowers they do, by having pollen attached to their body so that they land on another flower and there you go, baby making.


Or idea that a bee spread pollen from a tree is absurd. I don't know what is growing in your back yard but it is impossible that two seeds of a cherry and an apple tree fused together and grew as a chapple tree. Like that, thats what I named ur new fruit!


As far as I know anyways, the only way to mix a tree in that manor that fast is actual genetic engineering. Trees and the various fruits that they produce can change over time if their enviroment where to change through natural selection or evolution.

Personall from your decription I would assume your chapple tree is a crab apple tree. And I do appologize but that is most defently not new, I had a few on the farm when I grew up. A crab apple tree will look almost like an over sized cherry but is infact like an apple inside. I personally would not advise eating one, they don't taste all that great.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:17 PM
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Yeah you could be right, well then I bought an crab apple tree instead of an cherry tree.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
A bee in no way helps spread polination of a tree. Flowers they do, by having pollen attached to their body so that they land on another flower and there you go, baby making.


Or idea that a bee spread pollen from a tree is absurd.

Trees have flowers.. spreading the seed comes after it's been fertilised. Seperate process.

[edit on 22-10-2006 by riley]



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:50 PM
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Well that is true, both those trees grow flowers in the spring.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 03:39 PM
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Fruit trees have flowers, and those flowers can be pollinated by insects like bees. A bee could very easily pick up pollen on an apple tree and then go over to a cherry tree.

I am a little confused, why is the OP not sure if they have a crabapple tree or not? You said you bough two trees, an apple and a cherry tree, so presumably you've had cherries and apples from both at one point no? And you are saying that what previously fruited cherries, now has tiny apples growing on it?


www.ext.colostate.edu...
All varieties of apples require some cross-pollination.
All sour cherries are self-fruitful. All sweet cherry varieties, except Stella, are self-unfruitful and must be cross-pollinated.

See also:

muextension.missouri.edu...
Cross-pollination
The transfer of pollen between two different species or varieties
Self-pollination
The transfer of pollen within a single plant or among several plants of the same variety
Self-unfruitful or self-sterile
Plants in which very little fruit will set
Self-fruitful
Varieties that set fruit with their own pollen


Do your apple-cherries look like one of these:



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 03:52 PM
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When you cross pollinate, the fruit bearing tree, still only has instructions on how to make one kind of fruit..It does not matter what pollinated it.

For example, I have REd delicious, and a Fuji apple tree.

They pollinate each other, but still only produce the ORIGINAL fruit type.
Fuji on Fuji, Red DElicious on Red Delicious.
The Fruit type was determined in the original seed that the tree came from.

However. The offspring that comes from these cross pollinated Fuits, next generation, might produce a cross breed. YOu would only know if you grew something from the seeds you produce.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
Fruit trees have flowers, and those flowers can be pollinated by insects like bees. A bee could very easily pick up pollen on an apple tree and then go over to a cherry tree.

I am a little confused, why is the OP not sure if they have a crabapple tree or not? You said you bough two trees, an apple and a cherry tree, so presumably you've had cherries and apples from both at one point no? And you are saying that what previously fruited cherries, now has tiny apples growing on it?


www.ext.colostate.edu...
All varieties of apples require some cross-pollination.
All sour cherries are self-fruitful. All sweet cherry varieties, except Stella, are self-unfruitful and must be cross-pollinated.

See also:

muextension.missouri.edu...
Cross-pollination
The transfer of pollen between two different species or varieties
Self-pollination
The transfer of pollen within a single plant or among several plants of the same variety
Self-unfruitful or self-sterile
Plants in which very little fruit will set
Self-fruitful
Varieties that set fruit with their own pollen


Do your apple-cherries look like one of these:


Nope, they dont look like that. I had a cherry tree and an apple tree supposely and the bees carried the pollen to the cherry tree and it became an chapple tree (cherry+apple.)

Its more of an oval shape and some of them on the out side look like on side is an apple and the other is a cherry tree - but only very few. The inside of these chapples is an apple and if you look real closely the seeds look like those of a cherry. I found this out during this afternoon when I examined the tree and cut some chapples in half after I made this thread.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 06:44 PM
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Perhaps you could take some pictures of these Chapples (reminds
me of Charlie Chaplin), and post them.

It is an interesting notion that two fruits would hybridize to from
a new fruit.

[edit on 10/22/2006 by iori_komei]



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 07:03 PM
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Looking at them a couple of minutes ago I realized that I didnt cut into enough and now I see seeds resembling an apple except they are brown like a cherry.

- I will try to see if I can get a picture but sorry to say, that may take time.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 07:15 PM
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Yep. Crabapples.

Cherry tress and apple trees can't cross-pollinate. They're different species. Furthermore, pollination by one plant doesn't cause the other plant to suddenly "mutate" to something else... otherwise your body would mutate every time you ate food (you'd become a cow if you ate lots of beef.)

If trees mutated and accepted ANY pollen, then you could never have an orchard of one type of apple or one type of peach or one type of any fruit.

The tree in your yard is a crabapple.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Yep. Crabapples.

Cherry tress and apple trees can't cross-pollinate. They're different species. Furthermore, pollination by one plant doesn't cause the other plant to suddenly "mutate" to something else... otherwise your body would mutate every time you ate food (you'd become a cow if you ate lots of beef.)

If trees mutated and accepted ANY pollen, then you could never have an orchard of one type of apple or one type of peach or one type of any fruit.

The tree in your yard is a crabapple.


Thats exactly why I put "or not" in my title.



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