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Ammo Storage

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posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 01:29 PM
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So what's the best way to store bullets? I keep hundreds in metal U.S. ammo boxes with the bullets also being in there cardboard box to. They do not come in contact with water, and I keep them beside and under my bed.



Is all that safe and a good way of keeping them from corroading?




posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 01:35 PM
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yes.
Next question?
I have a few friends that believe that at some point in the future bullets may be used as currency. If that is the case you might want to have some spare boxes of the more popular calibers.



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
yes.
Next question?
I have a few friends that believe that at some point in the future bullets may be used as currency. If that is the case you might want to have some spare boxes of the more popular calibers.



Well I just wanted to make sure also that it being really really hot or really really cold in my room wouldnt mess them up either.



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 02:20 PM
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Attempt to avoid extreme temperature changes.
Condenstion is not your friend.



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 02:29 PM
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Are you talking about the change from summer to winter? Or like turing up the heat and then turning up the air conditioner?



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 03:05 PM
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As far as ammo is concerned, simply keeping it stored in the ammo cans should be sufficient. Avoid extreme temperature changes (going from sitting outside in the winter at nearly -10*F to putting them into an oven at 450*F).

If corrosion is your enemy, that would be due to moisture.

Place a bit of Silica in your ammo can to prevent moisture problems. Placing silica into your gun cabinets is also a good idea to prevent rust from forming on or near you weopons of choice.

Happy Hunting


www.sportsmansguide.com... for all your hunting needs. Enjoy



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 04:31 PM
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I too keep ammo in the same type of military cans. No problem here. I also keep ammo in 5 gallon plastic buckets. These are the type buckets you see in bakerys where the Iceing comes pre made and mixed. I use these because they have a gasket on the lids. I thoroughy clean them out and then pack my ammo in there in the various boxes. Also put in there is an olde sock with dessicant beads from a friend of mine who works for a commercial air compressor company. This dessicant is the type they use in commercial air dryers.

For really long term storage I put a bead of sealer...RTV type on the gasket before putting on the lid and then screw it down with small but sufficiently long screws. You must be careful when you do this so as to keep the screws going through the plastic of the bucket not into the bucket. You can store other goods in these buckets for long periods of time too. Clothes, medicines,Tools, fishing equipment, etc etc etc et al. I think they also sell these buckets at Lowes or Home Depot. They are not very expensive but a great way of keeping stuff dry.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
Also put in there is an olde sock with dessicant beads from a friend of mine who works for a commercial air compressor company.


As a sidenote, if dessicant/silica is used... be aware that they can/will only withdrawl only so much moisture before it becomes saturated. When that happens, simply place the said dessicant/silica into your oven at 250-350*F for about a couple hours to dry it out (reactivate it).

Cheers.

Edit for reactivation timeframe.

[edit on 10/21/2006 by Infoholic]



posted on Oct, 21 2006 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by Infoholic

Originally posted by orangetom1999
Also put in there is an olde sock with dessicant beads from a friend of mine who works for a commercial air compressor company.


As a sidenote, if dessicant/silica is used... be aware that they can/will only withdrawl only so much moisture before it becomes saturated. When that happens, simply place the said dessicant/silica into your oven at 250-350*F for about a couple hours to dry it out (reactivate it).

Cheers.

Edit for reactivation timeframe.

[edit on 10/21/2006 by Infoholic]


Yes..precisely ..that is exactly how it is done commercially in heated towers ..one side on line and working while the other tower is redried...and prepared to go back on line.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:19 PM
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Just avoid extreme heat (garage storage in very hot climates) and moisture (garage storage in damp or humid climates).

Ammunition will last for a VERY long time. Ammunition from World War 2 is still entirely functional, and a 60 year lifetime will suffice for most us



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