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AWOL Bag

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posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 02:00 PM
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Also known as the bug-out bag, this is an ESSENTIAL piece of kit. It's something that most people should have. For those who don't know what they are, bug-out bags are a sack filled with the essentials for a fews days, that you can just pick up and go with in case something happens, like your haus catching fire. You grab it as you go, maybe keep it in the trunk of your car.

Because, in case of emergency, you'll probably have time to grab maybe three things, and the essentials are comprised of more than three things.

You limit yourself to three things (or less as the case may be) and you start chipping away at your ability to survive independently, especially if things like stores are no longer available. All you folks in hurricane regions know what I'm talking about. The basics:

1. Change of clothing: very important. If you get wet, and have no shelter, hypothermia all up in. plus, hygenic reasons. two pairs of socks, trust me on this.

2. Wet Weather Gear: again, wet is not something you want to be.

3. Food: Well, depends. How much chow do you need? I'd day two days worth of MREs or so. If you don't know where you next meal is coming from, those beans n' franks will seem like mana.

4. Water purifcation tablets: carrying and storing water is a pain in the ass. bonus: water is heavy. Heavy is bad.

5. Lighter, folding knife, multitool: these three things are ESSENTIALS which should be on your belt or in your pocket from dawn to dusk all day, every day, 365 days a year. these are items that cannot be comprimised on. DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON THESE ITEMS.

6. Fixed blade knife: If you think that trying to hack through a branch with a combat knife instead of a hatchet is bad, imagine trying to do same with your folding knife. You life might depend on that, so a fixed blade knife is a must. Again, never cheap on a blade.

7. Blanket: preferably a Ranger Blanket. Cold is not your friend.

8. Change of footwear: If your current footwear gets wet, you don't want the Jungle Rot. I have gotten it; I didn't change my socks for a day, sweated on my feet a lot, ended up pulling of strips of skin over the course of the day and having to dig that crap out of my socks. Foot care is paramount. A change of footwear, even if it's sandals, is for the better.

9. First Aid Kit: Not a trauma kit, just enough to get through any minor injuries you may come across. You're not a surgeon.

10: Hygenics: Staying clean is important. Without it, morale degrades and siease becomes more probable. Take the essentials (toothbrush, etc), but bonus points for bringing foot powder.

11. Pen and Paper: weighs nothing, but essential. Store in a waterproof manner.

Those are the very essentials. It's a fairly light ruck- that's how you want it to be. the heavier it gets, the worse a long hike gets...exponentially. You might have room in your bag (make sure it's a good, milspec one) for more food, more items. Well, if you can handle it, go for it. Make sure you can walk five or ten miles with the ruck on your back.

Bonus points:

1. Handgun: If you can use it, and it's legal to carry, go for the gusto. Handgun, box of ammo, three magazines.

2. Hatchet: Tomahawk if at all possible. It's got mad versatility, and it's pretty light. It's just...super awkward.

3. Tent: If you have the room and strength, HUGE bonus points for portable shelter.

4. Rope: Gotta have rope. Man would be nothing without rope.

5. Bungee cords: just one of those unusually practical items.


Any suggestions or advice on making your AWOL bag?

DE

mod edit: removed survivalist from title due to creation of new forum

[edit on 12-12-2006 by UK Wizard]




posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 02:08 PM
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Instead of a hatchet you could use a machete. They are pretty light, thin, so you can slide them in a bag. I cut down a 7 inch thick tree with it in about 10 minutes.

Plus they are good for leaves/branches/vines.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by enjoies05]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 02:09 PM
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You forgot tin foil, How can you survive without tin foil? I am an Armyy Ranger, what do you need all these items for in the year 2006? If what you are suggesting is that people actualy need this stuff, then you DO NOT WANT TO GO WITHOUT THE TIN FOIL! IT IS SUICIDE!

PS,
Nanu-nanu!



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 02:59 PM
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I forgot some stuff, which is pretty embarassing, but electronics are the enemy. A flashlight would certainly not go amiss, nor would a a hand-crank radio.

As for machete versus hatchet, the hatchet can be used for better chopping, and more importantly, it has an end that can be used for serious hammering. A machete cannot double as a hammer. It's just funny-shapped.

DE



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 03:02 PM
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I see.

Another good thing would be lighters or a magnesium stick. You have to have a fire.

Edit: Oh! Nevermind. I see you already wrote those.


[edit on 20-10-2006 by enjoies05]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 03:17 PM
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Enjoie,
2 right,flint striker/magnesium stick is a must.
They spark when wet,not like matches...and they last for ages.
Vance:
Tin foil is essential,well said.I carry a bit of tough mesh too,the sort you get on a single use BBQ is adequate.
Good thread DeusEx,
I carry i sort of mini version in my car,and have another more comprehensive version near my home.
(No machetes in my car version,and only a very small blade,as I live in Blighty and would get locked up for carrying a big blade...heheh)
I would always reccomend a good AWOL type bag to be stored away from the main house where you live,in case of fire.
A good hole will do nicely.
Also for the survival eventuallity,high fat storeables like any nuts are good.
In the ideal situation,a knowledge of underground water systems/springs /aquifers is well worth the research time as well.

Preparation is the key.



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 03:43 PM
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what i have in my BOB:

1. tube tent with rope...the maximum shelter for the weight. weight is everything.
2. small medical kit.
3. both a small hatchet and a small wyoming saw (much better than a hatchet in some instances).
4. matches, lighters, and striker with flint.
5. single packets of soups, oatmeals, and granola bars
6. two 1 quart canteens with water purifier tablets attached to the side of the bag.
7. two bandanas....absolutely essential for numerous needs from medical to straining water.
8. two small square emergency blankets and an emergency sleeping bag which is about the same size.
9. small maglight with extra batteries and bulbs (make sure you store the batteries outside of the light....if they are in series, even with the light off, they will wear down quickly.
10. climbing rope and biner.
11. 3 pairs of spare socks and spare boxers. it is essential to keep your feet dry.
12. small candle.
13. 386pd revolver with two speed loaders for a total of 21 rounds with holster.
14. hunting knife with sheath.
15. compass.
16. small sewing kit with safety pins....which are a must for any bag. thousands of uses.
17. duck tape rolled around a pencil for maximization of space.
18. light-weight poncho (folds into a 3x3 in square).
19. several ziplock bags.....again, multiple uses. paper and topographical map of virginia kept in one.
20. wind up radio with small earphones.

total weight: 30 pounds. could probably make it lighter, but i have found by experimentation that this is what i need for up to one week. optimal time hiking back to my house from where i work is three days, but always plan for the worst.



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 03:45 PM
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Silicone- I suggest a wood axe or small saw in place of a larger blade. Old Blightey is still full of things that need cuttin', or hackin'. Not to mention the parts of Ol' Blightey that border with Jockland...remember Glasgow, yo.

And you DEFINITELY don't want to try and make kindling or anything with your pocketknife.

DE



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 03:56 PM
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Buy a good digital scale to weigh in your AWOL bag and try to shave as many grams as you can. Experiment with different products and what not that may be made of different materials and such.

If in a family unit have everyone pack nearl identical packs, with slight differences to augment the available tools on the road. Have a backup destination selected for meetup if you get seperated.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:01 PM
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That's another point, but have somehwere to go TO. If it's just a spot to rendezvous with others, that's fine. If it's secluded, also not bad. if it's a cache location, bonus points. Make sure you know more than one way there.

DE



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by DeusEx
Silicone- I suggest a wood axe or small saw in place of a larger blade. Old Blightey is still full of things that need cuttin', or hackin'. Not to mention the parts of Ol' Blightey that border with Jockland...remember Glasgow, yo.
DE


Heh he,Nice one man,yep got those tools in my main,just not in the car.
Me an my buds used to make little ungerground shelters in welsh forests back in the late 80s/early90s,stay there for a week sometimes.Clay ovens,the works.
Its the way man,make a camp,go fishing and collecting food.
I`m a bit rusty these days,so threads like this are real helpful re fresher courses!
When i can i spend a few days on the moors with my bros and dogs to practise the skills-its silly really,now we have to set aside time to practise what was once natural to us all.Bl**dy work, eh?




posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:12 PM
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Oh yeah, as for a weapon, I'd prefer a compound bow and/or an autoloader crossbow whichever is lighter(including ammunition).

Learning how to make additional ammunition is a plus as well.


Silent, recoverable ammunition and decent range.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:17 PM
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Sard, that's a hell of a thing to pack. It's big, bulky...to be honest, not a bad choice considering our gun laws.

Optimally, you have REAL firepower in your gun vault. You run, grab all that before it cooks off, goes underwater, etc. or as much as you can, grab your pack, and get moving.

For us, I'd suggest the Garand or the Enfield. Both are legendarily rugged, and both are the only rifles in the country allowed more than five rounds in the magazine. The Enfield would be my choice, but I'd try to have an assortment of weaponry waiting for me at the cache point.

SMLE is my choice, maybe a sidearm, but they aren't part of the pack, they're SUPER ULTRA BONUS HAPPY TIME items.

DE



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:26 PM
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Sard, that's a hell of a thing to pack. It's big, bulky...to be honest, not a bad choice considering our gun laws.


They may be big and awkward to carry, but they are pretty light and with a leather sling for easy carrying.(It has to be leather treated with this type of oil, similiar to the stuff used on shoes but lasts longer). The composites nowadays are made of the same materials 200 dollar hockey sticks are made of, so yeah, they are light. They are adjustable so anyone above age 16 will be able to draw it to a usefull tension. They are also collapsable to a more managable bulk, though if your hunting or being hunted, you'd want it in your sling for easy access. I prefer an autoloader crossbow myself. The bolts are quite small and lightweight. It works by both a crank and electricity. It was a helluva fun time to use as well. Liked it way better then the composite.

Of course having a gun in on you for self defense purposes would be good to have as well. I was thinking of using the bow to hunting. It's harder that way as you gotta get closer, but if you're skilled enough you won't miss and won't alert others nearby to your presence.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Oh yeah, as for a weapon, I'd prefer a compound bow and/or an autoloader crossbow whichever is lighter(including ammunition).

Learning how to make additional ammunition is a plus as well.


Silent, recoverable ammunition and decent range.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by sardion2000]


A first class choice of tools for survival hunting,Sardion.
Tried making bows as a kid-nowt special,but good for DIY flare/signal type jobbie,with a firework attached to home made arrows.
Never got advanced enough to make a high power accurate bow.
I would really love a mongolian hunting bow,if i came about some money.
Can you reccomend a good bow for a rusty survivalist,with very little compound bow experience?
I am tall but lean in stature, 6 ft 1inches78KG.what would you suggest as a good all rounder for me?
Sorry for the inquisition,thanks.


CX

posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:35 PM
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Nice thread, it's amazing that something as small as a bag and it's contents can keep you going for ages if neccessary.

Such a shame that many people will scoff at such preparations because they are convinced thier goverment will take care of them when the time comes.


Out of interest, what bags/rucksacks do you guys use for your BOB's?

CX.



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 04:53 PM
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I would use military surplus. No question. For me, the CF rucksack is here, common, available, and cheap. It's the stuff the Empire was built on.

If it was good enough for the Empire, it'll be good enough for me.

www.army.gc.ca...

In cadpat, of course, if possible.

DE



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by Silcone SynapseCan you reccomend a good bow for a rusty survivalist,with very little compound bow experience?
I am tall but lean in stature, 6 ft 1inches78KG.what would you suggest as a good all rounder for me?
Sorry for the inquisition,thanks.


First thing, don't chince on the money. You may wince, but you'll love it in the long run for it's lightweigt and adjustability....or so I've been told and from the experience I've had with some thousand dollar plus compound bow and a custom crossbow I believe.

Second thing, I'm not an expert(I don't even own my own bow yet, I'm saving for a Custom Autoloader Crossbow) and can only classify myself (barely) intermediate level. My advice to you is to find an expert giving classes and to trust his advice.

Third thing, when you've found your archery guru, have him help you pick out a bow for you when you are ready for it. There are certain muscle groups you need to develop more in order to use a compound bow effectively(accurate 150+ meter shots).

Here are some websites that should help you along.

www.kevinboone.com...

www.huntersfriend.com...




For us, I'd suggest the Garand or the Enfield. Both are legendarily rugged, and both are the only rifles in the country allowed more than five rounds in the magazine. The Enfield would be my choice, but I'd try to have an assortment of weaponry waiting for me at the cache point.


A rifle would be great, but I've held them and have fired off a few rounds once and they are way heavier then a Collapsable Compound Bow and are fricken loud! I'd want to rely on stealth more then anything else.

[edit on 20-10-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 07:40 PM
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i use the standard issue medium sized alice pack with frame. there are much lighter bags on the market, but this is what i've used for years hiking the appalacian and other trails. it's durable, reasonably lightweight, comfortable, and can carry alot of crap. you can also use it without the frame to lighten it up by a pound or two, but it's much more comfy and rides better on your back with it.



posted on Oct, 20 2006 @ 11:19 PM
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Excellent advice by DeusEx, and from other members too.

In addition a small detail but important nonetheless if you want stealth. Go for military gear, the backpack was designed specifically with that in mind.

Because try walking in the woods with a cheap backpack bought at your local hardware store, you will quickly realize that the metal zippers hitting against each others sounds like loud cowbells in the silence of the night. Not the best thing if a bad guy is chasing you.

Same with clothings, for example 100% Polyester pants rubbing against your legs as you walk is noisy. You can't go wrong with Propper BDUs or equivalent, those are relatively silent pants, but I'm sure there is even more silent clothes out there.





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