It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Outrage Over Children Reciting The Pledge Of Allegiance To The Mexican Flag

page: 5
7
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by apc
Check your passport, but I'm pretty sure pledging allegiance to another nation is one way to cast away your citizenship.


Verbally denouncing your citizenship or even accepting another country as your own will not rid you of your citizenship. It's almost that easy. Overseas simply go your Embassy or Consulate and sign a letter along with two witnesses and a consular officer. It's actually a bit harder stateside, there's a long process and arse load of paperwork.


It's a public school funded by U.S. tax dollars, I think that should answer the question as wether or not pledging to the Mexican is OK or not.



apc

posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:58 AM
link   
From my passport:

"LOSS OF CITIZENSHIP. Under certain circumstances, you may lose your U.S. citizenship by performing any of the following acts: (1) being naturalized in a foreign state; (2) taking an oath or making a declaration to a foreign state; (3) serving in the armed forces of a foreign state; (4) accepting employment with a foreign government; or (5) formally renouncing U.S. citizenship before a U.S. consular officer overseas."

So I guess it would come down to whether or not pledging allegiance to a foreign flag qualifies as taking an oath?



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 01:19 AM
link   
Unrealised, I agree with you about Iemma (thats a whole other story:lol


I think Australia is very PATRIOTIC. Unfortunately, if your an Australian Patriot,
you're also nine out ten times called a white supremist, nazi or racist.
Australia Day and more probably ANZAC DAY are days when you'll see patriots
out and about waving the flags because its a safe way of showing patriotism without
all the usual suspects coming out of the woodwork to make us feel guilty/ashamed/embarrassed.


Apologies to others for being offtopic.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 02:00 AM
link   

Originally posted by apc
(1) being naturalized in a foreign state;

Ok, wait, does'nt that mean than that you can't have dual citizenship,
or does naturalization mean something else?

Just curious, since I've never actually looked at this kind of stuff.


apc

posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 11:35 AM
link   
"DUAL CITIZENS. A person who has the citizenship of more than one country at the same time is considered a dual citizen. Citizenship may be based on facts of birth, marriage, parentage, or naturalization. A dual citizen may be subject to all of the laws of the other country that considers that person its citizen while in its jurisdiction. This includes conscription for military service. Dual citizens who encounter problems abroad should contact the nearest American Embassy or Consulate."

I guess as long as those "certain circumstances" don't apply, dual citizenship is fine. And those same "certain circumstances" probably don't involve a pledge of allegiance. My passport does not however define what those circumstances are.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 12:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by selfless

Ps: LoneGunMan i respect you highly and i hope you take no offense to my statement.


peace.


Don’t worry; I know what you are saying. I am a very spiritual person, and believe all people are created equal. I feel strongly about the pledge because I took an oath to protect the American people. I raise the flag at work, and say the pledge of allegiance at work also.

If I don’t feel a strong allegiance for what this country stands for, and that most Americans feel this deep down inside, then how can I keep fulfilling my oath of protection of my community. This drives me to go where others run from, to help those that are left behind. I don’t mean this is a nationalistic thing, it is an ideal. I would risk my life for any person, no matter what they believe for we are all from the same source

This is also what makes me fight the current governements bend towards taking awy our freedom, and taking us closer to a police/nanny state every year. I pledge alliegence to the flag of united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands one nation under god indivisable with liberty and justice for all. Those seven last words are what this government has forgot.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 03:47 PM
link   
Hmm, let's see here. From space I see no colored countries or wide boarders between states. Air travels freely from one continent to another, water as well. The Sun shines on all parts equally, and the Moon sheds her glory on all parts equally as well. I look at a Latino, and I don't see an insidious agenda attempting to usurp the place of home from white skinned people. Instead I see someone with feelings, trials and challenges, and all the mix that makes us human attempting to make it in an already cruel and heartless world.

This kind of news is damaging to the melting pot. At worst it is wishful thinking. Many flags fly over our land, just look at the UN. Political correctness aside, legislation against reality generates prejudice.



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 04:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by Matyas
This kind of news is damaging to the melting pot.


I think the melting pot is melting down!


There is nothing wrong with having alegience to a country, or having one language, or having national pride. We are on one world, but I live in a city, that resides in a State, that is part of a nation, that is one of many that make up the world...

It is all one big melting pot isnt it?



posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 05:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by apc
From my passport:


Most of the "acts" written on your passport are not simply carried out by just saying an oath, or joining a military, there's a procress for each one.


"LOSS OF CITIZENSHIP. Under certain circumstances, you may lose your U.S. citizenship by performing any of the following acts:

May is hi-lited


(1) being naturalized in a foreign state;

Many Americans have dual citizenship



(2) taking an oath or making a declaration to a foreign state;

Again, there are many Americans that do this.


(3) serving in the armed forces of a foreign state;

Many Jewish Americans serve a short term in the IDF.


(4) accepting employment with a foreign government; or

You don't think foreign Embassies in the states fly-over their own janitors and support staff do you? No, they're local hires, Americans.


(5) formally renouncing U.S. citizenship before a U.S. consular officer overseas."

It's much easier to do overseas...


So I guess it would come down to whether or not pledging allegiance to a foreign flag qualifies as taking an oath?

Yes, pledging to a foreign flag could be considered as taking an oath to a foreign government....but that happens all the time and noone hardly ever gets stripped of their US citizenship because of it. It does NOT simply come down to saying an oath.

All the "acts" that are stated in your passport are in there as a back door for the US government to kank your citizenship if they ever have to.


apc

posted on Oct, 22 2006 @ 05:23 PM
link   
... I'm not trying to argue any points... just stating the facts, whatever they may be. That's just what it says in black and white. well... blue and darker blue actually.




top topics



 
7
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join