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Discovered, Element 118

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posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 05:54 AM
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A joint U.S. Russian team said Monday that it had created element 118. The team is seeking heavier atoms searching for a theoretical island of stability. Element 118 is the fifth ultra heavy element produced by the team a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna Russia. Only three atoms of the element were produced each of which lasted less then a thousandth of a second. This discovery will have no immediate application. Element 118 is the heaviest known element.
 



www.latimes.com
A U.S. and Russian team said Monday that it had created element 118, the heaviest known to date.

It is the fifth ultra-heavy element produced by the team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia, which has come to dominate the creation of short-lived elements.

Although they produced only three atoms of element 118, and each lasted for less than a thousandth of a second, the team said that there is less than one chance in 10,000 of mistaken identity.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I think its great that this has been done. It is just I wonder how far off we are from the island of stability, since this element lasted less then one-thousandth of a second. Element 115 is talked about some hear on ATS, so I do wonder just how useful that element really is. If the quest will continue for the island of stability I suppose the next step will be element 119. So I wonder how long it will take them to find that one.

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posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 03:30 PM
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I really don't think creating a new element is the same as discovering one...discovering one suggest that it was already in existance, and in this case, it wasn't.



posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 03:50 PM
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It might not naturally exist here on Earth but that does not mean it cannot exist elsewhere.



posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 07:11 PM
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I have been out of the sciences for quite some time, but as I do rember there are quite a few elements that are not found on earth. Rare earth elements is what comes to mind. The thing is if these elements ever did exist they would have decayed. So the way I like to look at it is that these elements did exist at the begining of the universe. So you could kind of say that they are creating something that was ounce on earth but is not any longer.



posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 07:31 PM
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Good find. Thanks.


My questions:

Can synthetic elements be used for nuclear weapons?

If they can be, then would the evidence of their use just decay and disappear?





posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 07:40 PM
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No this cannot be used for weapons as it doesn't last long enough and isn't created in large enough quantities to be used in a weapon, much like Anti-Matter. The reason this stuff is important is to look for deviations in the expected distribution of all elements that can exist. Some hypothesize that there may be an island of stability, others say that there are no elements past 138 due to some Relativity restrictions. We shall all see, or maybe not since at the rate we are going it will be some centuries before we have the periodic table completely filled out. Then there are meta-molecules which just throws the whole scheme out of whack but that is another topic alltoghether.



I have been out of the sciences for quite some time, but as I do rember there are quite a few elements that are not found on earth. Rare earth elements is what comes to mind. The thing is if these elements ever did exist they would have decayed.


Rare earth elements occur on earth. They are used in a variety of applications where certain types of magnets are needed.




It might not naturally exist here on Earth but that does not mean it cannot exist elsewhere.


Actually, in the case of the superheavies, yes it does. The decay rates of these particles are too short. I'm talking microsecond to nanosecond decay rates. The longest superheavy decay rate I've heard of is in the hundreds of microseconds.

[edit on 17-10-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 07:56 PM
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Sardion,
Thanks for the correction.
I was trying to rember back to my science class that that has been a little bit longer ago then I care to rember



posted on Oct, 18 2006 @ 04:50 AM
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I just found this interesting article....aparently it's almost been found before. So a new element of just the next logical element?

Quote from Berkeley Lab website


BERKELEY, CA — The team of Berkeley Lab scientists that announced two years ago the observation of what appeared to be Element 118 -- heaviest undiscovered transuranic element at the time -- has retracted its original paper after several confirmation experiments failed to reproduce the results.

A technical committee of experts from the Laboratory’s physics, supercomputing, and nuclear science divisions is reviewing the data and methodology from that 1999 result. Subsequent re-analyses of the original data with different software codes have been unsuccessful in observing atomic decay patterns, or chains, which would confirm the existence of element 118.

In a brief statement submitted to Physical Review Letters, the same publication in which the original results were announced, the research team stated: "In 1999, we reported the synthesis of element 118 in the (lead-krypton) reaction based upon the observation of three decay chains, each consisting of an implanted heavy atom and six sequential high-energy alpha decays, correlated in time and position. Prompted by the absence of similar decay chains in subsequent experiments, we (along with independent experts) re-analyzed the primary data files from our 1999 experiments. Based on these re-analyses, we conclude that the three reported chains are not in the 1999 data. We retract our published claim for the synthesis of element 118."

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


www.lbl.gov...


Note this piece was posted July 27, 2001 thought it was interesting.



posted on Oct, 18 2006 @ 06:17 AM
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That's great news, gives me hope to see we are still progressing in particle physics.

There was a good show recently on Nova about creating these new elements:


NOVA- Island of Stability (transcript and video at the link)

There are two areas that I find quite exciting. One is the continuation of the work that we have performed for about 15 years in collaboration with our colleagues at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna, Russia, using an isotope separator connected to their cyclotron to collect rare isotopes and isolate them from the vast amount of unwanted reaction products. The second is a new project, again in collaboration with our Russian friends, in which we are performing chemistry experiments in hopes of determining the detailed chemical properties of the elements we are making.

We have recently made an attempt to produce element 118; we hope that the results of this experiment will help lay the issue to rest.


Livermore scientists team with Russia to discover element 118 llnl.gov
(nice graphical illustrations)




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