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Jupiter's smaller spot getting redder

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posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 06:11 PM
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Our ever changing universe,pretty cool.


(Washington AP)- The little brother to the Great Red Spot on Jupiter is getting redder and stronger.

Both spots are actually fierce storms in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the Great Red Spot -- at three times the size of Earth -- is much more noticeable, strange things are happening to the smaller spot.


www.cnn.com...

[edit on 11-10-2006 by Black_Fox]




posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 06:18 PM
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There's wind on Jupiter? Does that mean there's air on Jupiter?



Just a little more than a year ago, the Earth-sized spot was a pale white. Now it matches the reddish hue of its bigger sibling and boasts 400 mile per hour winds, according to new data from the Hubble Space Telescope.




posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 06:34 PM
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There is wind on any planet with atmosphere.
What we call air is just a mixture of gasses here on earth, in other words our atmosphere.
Jupiter's atmosphere is mostly composed of hydrogen.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 06:41 PM
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Jupiter is mostly atmosphere, if not all atmosphere. Of course there are strong winds on the planet.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 06:59 PM
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Everytime I hear anything about Jupiter, I can't help recalling about the movie:
2010...the year we made contact.

If Jupiters' red spot is perhaps getting hotter, I wonder how that would affect the planet as a whole?

Ever since mankind has been able to view Jupiter with telescopes et al, there has been no change (to my knowledge) of the infamous 'red-spot' contracting or expanding or anything to that nature.

We have viewed astroids bombarding this planet, and to the publics knowledge, there hasn't been any significant changes to mention other than the fact of viewing ongoing changes that happen naturally throughout our universe.

As our solar system travels around the universe, there are many factors that play into constructing/deconstructing/evolving planets and the like.

What do we really KNOW about Jupiters' gasseous environment?

Is it possible that this 'SLEEPING GIANT' is evolving?

Evolving in the context that the 'red-eye' of Jupiter has maintained such a gaseous bomb? up til now, and that within its evolutionary scale this planet could perhaps turn into a star?



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 07:07 PM
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If Jupiters' red spot is perhaps getting hotter, I wonder how that would affect the planet as a whole?


TheDuckster, the article speaks of the new red spot and it doesn’t mention temperature. It is saying “Jupiter's smaller spot getting redder."



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 07:08 PM
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If Jupiter ever became a star, it would completely change our entire understanding of physics.

I really,really,really doubt that will happen.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by TheDuckster

What do we really KNOW about Jupiters' gasseous environment?

Is it possible that this 'SLEEPING GIANT' is evolving?

Evolving in the context that the 'red-eye' of Jupiter has maintained such a gaseous bomb? up til now, and that within its evolutionary scale this planet could perhaps turn into a star?


Im thinking this would really be a Bad thing, don't you think?

Im wondering how long these storms last...decades? centuries?? or longer



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
If Jupiter ever became a star, it would completely change our entire understanding of physics.

I really,really,really doubt that will happen.


If Jupiter became a star, which it is very far from becoming, its gravity and radiation would cause chaos to the solar system and would probably destroy earth and most of the other planets. The two stars would then probably merge being so close in proximity with each other.

Our understanding of physics would definitely change and then we would die


Jupiter has not nearly enough mass for the fusion process to begin, so we have nothing to worry about.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 09:01 PM
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If Jupiter became a star, yet remained the same mass, I don't see how it would upset the solar system that much.

But yes, it probably would fry us all!



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