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One of The Universes Greatest Mysteries: The Great Attractor

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posted on Oct, 10 2006 @ 11:47 PM
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While I was doing some reading, which I do for entertainemtn pruposes,
on the cosmos, I came across an article that mentioned the Great Attractor.

Now being the curious Homo Sapien Imperium (that's a joke by the
way) that I am, I decided to do some research about it.

I was'nt able to find alot about it, but what I did find out peaked my interest
to no end.

Some information about the Great Attractor; courtesy Wikipedia


The Great Attractor is a gravity anomaly in intergalactic space within the
range of the Centaurus Supercluster which reveals the existence of a loca-
lised concentration of mass equivalent to tens of thousands of galaxies,
observable by its effect on the motion of galaxies over a region hundreds
of millions of light years across.

These galaxies are all redshifted, in accordance with the Hubble Flow, indi-
cating that they are receding relative to us and to each other, but the vari-
ations in their redshift are sufficient to reveal the existence of the anomaly.

The phenomenon was first discovered in 1986 and lies at a distance of
somewhere between 150 million and 250 million light years (the latter
being the most recent estimate) from the Milky Way, in the direction of
the Hydra and Centaurus constellations.
That region of space is dominated by the Norma cluster (ACO 3627)[1],
a massive cluster of galaxies, and contains a preponderance of large,
old galaxies, many of which are colliding with their neighbours, and/or
radiating large amounts of radio waves.

Attempts to further study the Great Attractor and other phenomena are
hampered due to line of sight obstruction by its location in the zone of
avoidance (the part of the night sky obscured by the Milky Way galaxy).



Now since this phenomenon is so incredibly far away, we face problems
giving it any truly adequate study.

Even so, it does leave one to wonder, just what exactly could the Great
Attractor be?


So, my fellow ATSers, what do you think the Great Attractor is and/or
what causes it?

[edit on 10/10/2006 by iori_komei]




posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 12:06 AM
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I think this could be something that all the galaxys we see around us rotate around? Kind of like the galaxys, and stuff with the stars swerling around the middle.

Also it might be a massive rock in space that cant be seen because not enough light or it might be something thats stuck between two dimensions, or it might be a form of matter we have yet to discover, million things.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 12:18 AM
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Even so, it does leave one to wonder, just what exactly could the Great


The question should be "What was the Great Attractor. We can never know what it is. We don't even know if it still exists.

One of the things that puzzles me about astronomy. They talk of things being "the oldest" because it is observed at being x amount of light years away, or "x galaxy is here in relation to y galaxy".

But because of the distances involved and the speed of light, how do we know these things are where they are in relation to other things? How do we even know the milky way is a spiral?

I mean, some stars the light is only a few light years away, others it is 100,000 light years, but they plot the position as to how we percieve them in the night sky. It would be akin to viewing modern London in the same picture as Roman Colchester, if you catch my drift. Both do not exist in the same time frame, but appear in the same picture. One exists now, one existed then. They do not exist side by side in their formats, but modern astronomy portrays them as such.

Is this "distortion", for want of a better word, taken into account with modern astronomy. I once posted a thread to this very question and no-one could give a staisfactory answer.



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 11:59 AM
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There was a nicely illustrated program on a while ago, maybe Nova?, that showed how the a section of the Milky Way would ultimately collide with another galaxy. We won't be around, fortunately



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by Cruizer
There was a nicely illustrated program on a while ago, maybe Nova?, that showed how the a section of the Milky Way would ultimately collide with another galaxy. We won't be around, fortunately


All im worried about is getting a good veiw if the end of the world happens...............



posted on Oct, 11 2006 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by Cruizer
There was a nicely illustrated program on a while ago, maybe Nova?, that showed how the a section of the Milky Way would ultimately collide with another galaxy. We won't be around, fortunately


I've not seen the program on that, but yes, in a few either b/million years
our galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy will collide, eventually creating a
new larger galaxy.



posted on Oct, 12 2006 @ 01:15 AM
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I heard it will just pass right through each other because they are going so fast and the megnitism and gravity will cause the stars to automatically move away from each other.

[edit on 12-10-2006 by trIckz_R_fO_kIdz]



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