Blacks Living in Queens Make More than Whites

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posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 01:46 PM
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I thought this was interesting:



The New York Times

Across the country, the income gap between blacks and whites remains wide, and nowhere more so than in Manhattan. But just a river away, a very different story is unfolding.

In Queens, the median income among black households, nearing $52,000 a year, has surpassed that of whites in 2005, an analysis of new census data shows. No other county in the country with a population over 65,000 can make that claim. The gains among blacks in Queens, the city’s quintessential middle-class borough, were driven largely by the growth of two-parent families and the successes of immigrants from the West Indies. Many live in tidy homes in verdant enclaves like Cambria Heights, Rosedale and Laurelton, just west of the Cross Island Parkway and the border with Nassau County.

David Veron, a 45-year-old lawyer, is one of them. He estimates that the house in St. Albans that he bought with his wife, Nitchel, three years ago for about $320,000 has nearly doubled in value since they renovated it. Two-family homes priced at $600,000 and more seem to be sprouting on every vacant lot, he says.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


It seems like social economic equality among races is becoming a reality, at least in the outer boroughs of NYC.




posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 03:00 PM
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I also notice some of the contributing factors; i.e., two-parent families. Most of the time, that signifies stability, and stability encourages personal growth.



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
I also notice some of the contributing factors; i.e., two-parent families. Most of the time, that signifies stability, and stability encourages personal growth.


Even at the risk of being called racist or something, I must also note one the listed factors was blacks from the Carribean islands, not "native American" (for lack of a better term) blacks.



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 03:52 PM
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Still


The real problems, which do exist, relate in large measure to the black underclass in the nation's inner cities who suffer not from "white racism" or the "legacy of slavery" but from an internal breakdown of the family structure. In the 1960s, the overall family structure of black Americans began to crumble.
In 1950, some 78 percent of black households featured a married couple, comparing loosely with 88 percent of white households. The proportion of black children born in female-headed households was 23 percent in 1960 and 62 percent by the end of the 1980s. In 1988, some 56 percent of single-parent black households with children were living in poverty, compared with 12.5 percent of two-parent families with children.
www.worldandi.com...


Good find

Semper



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Even at the risk of being called racist or something, I must also note one the listed factors was blacks from the Carribean islands, not "native American" (for lack of a better term) blacks.

Not racist in the least, imo. I would guess that there are neighborhoods that act as support groups for those arriving in a new country. Much like many cities have a Germantown, Chinatown, or Little Italy.

Semper, the value of an intact family cannot be overstated. Kids need role models in the home, and the security that comes from the knowledge that there is love and boundaries from both parents.



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
It seems like social economic equality among races is becoming a reality, at least in the outer boroughs of NYC.


I certainly hope it spreads throughout the country!
I think that would do more than anything to improve race relations and address racism. Good for these people for grabbing the brass ring and holding on tight!

Great article.



Mr. Vernon, the lawyer from Jamaica, said: “It’s just that the people who left the Caribbean to come here are self-starters. It only stands to reason they would be more aggressive in pursuing their goals. And that creates a separation.”


This is a point that I think is very important. A person who looks at himself and takes responsibility for his success and future instead of blaming other people for lack of same can go places! Anywhere they want!



“When immigrants come here, they’re not accustomed to social programs,” he said, “and when they see opportunities they had no access to — tuition or academic or practical training — they are God-sent, and they use those programs to build themselves and move forward.”


For the above reason, I can honestly say that Affirmative Action can be a good thing. If people take advantage of it, there's absolutely no excuse not to strive for the very best this country has to offer. I don't normally praise Afirmative Action, but if people take advantage and use it how it was meant, I fully support it.



posted on Oct, 1 2006 @ 05:13 AM
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Overall, it is a very encouraging article. The importance of education was stressed as a key to success. I saw no mention of the obstacles posed by a "Dominant Culture".

Well-intentioned community leaders would do well to study Queens and pass on the lessons learned to other people.



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