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Questions about the Human Brain

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posted on Sep, 28 2006 @ 05:28 PM
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Good list of questions semper...


especially number 10:


original quote by: semperfortis
10. Do you think there are possible applications of Functional MRI in Paranormal research? If so, could you please elaborate?


This sums up the line of questions I had pertaining to psi very well.
I really lookf forward to this one...




posted on Sep, 28 2006 @ 08:27 PM
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Thanks Tone


ZZZ

Great reading!!!

It was what I expected, and will include your post in with the upcoming from Springer and the Neurologist I interviewed.
Thank you

Semper



posted on Sep, 28 2006 @ 11:28 PM
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Nice thread.



Originally posted by semperfortis
YES!!!

Your guitar analogy is "SPOT ON!"


This is true of all accomplished musicians. I agree, the analogy is a very good one.



Originally posted by semperfortis
No, I think that Fight or Flight is a primitive reflex action in response to certain EXTREME stimuli. That would make it a basic function and thereby unaffected by "training."


But here I disagree with the characterization that "fight or flight" responses are a "basic function." Rather, I think they are decisions made in response to a state of alertness in the brain concerning some perceived threat. I maintain even the state of alertness is a calculated "decision" heavily influenced by experience. The "basic functions", in my view, are the sensory ones reported to the brain. All else is something "higher".

Just my $.02.

Concerning additional questions, I'd be interested in the following:

1) Is there any evidence in favor of a physiological explanation for synesthesia?

2) In a similar regard, is there a physiological explanation for individuals reported to have innate "perfect pitch"?

3) As I recall, there is specific row of cells recently identified as responsible for our ability to perform the most basic of math functions-- counting. Does this assertion continue to be supported by the most current research?

4) From an anthropological standpoint, how long is it estimated the human brain has existed in its substantially current evolutionary form?

5) Are there significant deviations in the physical characteristics of brains from individuals considered medically "normal"? If so, can you describe the general nature and degree of those deviations?

6) Assuming there are such deviations, does it appear there is a hereditary component to their existence?

7) What represents the current most significant or promising line of research contributing to our understanding of brain function?

I could keep going, but these are a good start.



[edit on 28-9-2006 by loam]



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 12:48 AM
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I will present your questions to the Neurologist I have been interviewing.

I have already forwarded my questions to Springer, maybe he will check in on here and add yours as well.

Semper



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 12:55 AM
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As far as the Male brain is concerned, I have no idea...is it just me, or do the words "penis" and "pierce" go together like "Military Intelligence"

I need to find a less stressful job, like hammering dynamite into the ground with a sledgehammer...



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
I will present your questions to the Neurologist I have been interviewing.


Thanks, semper. Very cool!



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 09:32 AM
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I forwarded the questions to my "associate" and await his reply.


Springer...



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by Springer
I forwarded the questions to my "associate" and await his reply.


Springer...



yeay....I cant wait... Im so excited to read his responses


Thanks for doing this for us Springer..really cool of you...



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 12:44 PM
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I have a question about the prefrontal cortex, which controls the ability to predict events based on given data.

Is there any connection between people whom are considered "legit psychics" and the size or degree of advancement in the prefrontal cortex, and if so, what is the correlation?

It is my theory that, rather than being gifted with some sort of magical ability or some sort of transmission from the future, that such people are capable of observing and interpreting the most trivial of data and converting it, then consciously or unconsciously, factoring and computing it into the most plausable outcome.

This is, I believe, why "Police Psychics" work far more often than Madam Zoola types. The police will have already presented the psychic with far more details and data, then shown the crime scene, which has even more data, and without even knowing it, the alleged psychic has computed out the most likely series that took place.



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 02:46 PM
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is it true that our brain contains approx. 5% of its weight in Iridium and Rhodium? Could that be the superconductive property that transmits information between (brain)cells?

does the brain grow more effiecient or less effiecient with time? and in what areas is it more effiecient and which defiecient?

What does the ancient practice of 'drilling a hole in your head' help? why was this surgery perfected? what effect does it have on brain operation/function?



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 10:50 PM
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original quote: thelibra:Is there any connection between people whom are considered "legit psychics" and the size or degree of advancement in the prefrontal cortex, and if so, what is the correlation?


I Posed this to Doctor Mencken and his response is:


"If you can get a "qualified" Physician to agree to the existence of a "Legit Psychic" they would probably tell you that at this point, there just is not enough information or research into the subject."


I checked the research from Kepplinger and Persinger and there was nothing pertinent to that topic.

I'll keep looking, but right at this time there seems to be a common thread among researchers that a Legitimate Psychic is yet to be found.

Semper



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 11:00 PM
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PE,


is it true that our brain contains approx. 5% of its weight in Iridium and Rhodium? Could that be the superconductive property that transmits information between (brain)cells?



The one thing rhodium and iridium have in common with other monatomic/diatomics is that they increase the flow of "lifeforce" through the physical systems and increase cellular "communication," especially in the brain and nervous system. Before rhodium and iridium, you could say your brain and nervous system is struggling to send "light signals" across copper cables, but after using them you'll know that those copper cables have been upgraded to fiber optics, able to carry 1,000 times as much information and improving synaptic (neuron firing) processes.
www.theaethergroup.com...



does the brain grow more effiecient or less effiecient with time? and in what areas is it more effiecient and which defiecient?



Brain: Brain function varies normally as people pass from childhood through adulthood to old age. During childhood, the ability to think and reason steadily increases, enabling a child to learn increasingly complex skills. During most of adulthood, brain function is relatively stable. After a certain age, which varies from person to person, brain function declines. Different aspects of brain function are affected at different times. Short-term memory and the ability to learn new material tend to be affected relatively early. Verbal abilities, including vocabulary and word usage, may begin to decline at about age 70. Intellectual performance—the ability to process information (regardless of speed)—is usually maintained until about age 80 if no neurologic disorders are present. Reaction time and performance of tasks may become slower because the brain processes nerve impulses more slowly. However, the effects of aging on brain function may be difficult to separate from the effects of various disorders that are common among older people. These disorders include depression, stroke, an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), and degenerative brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.
www.merck.com...



What does the ancient practice of 'drilling a hole in your head' help? why was this surgery perfected? what effect does it have on brain operation/function?


Are you referring to a Lobotomy?

Semper



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by semperfortis

What does the ancient practice of 'drilling a hole in your head' help? why was this surgery perfected? what effect does it have on brain operation/function?


Are you referring to a Lobotomy?


No, actually I think they're referring to trenching, which has been done practically since man learned to use tools. Back then it was usually a triangular hole cut into the skull, not for any particular reason of liking the triangle, but rather because it was the shortest number of cuts needed to make a "precision" hole in the skull.

The reason was probably back then to let out "evil spirits", but in all actuality, such practice is still used today (though by much more sophisticated means) in order to relieve pressure on the braincase when the brain itself begins to swell or fill with fluid. See, our brains are normally pressurized already, and normally this poses no problem. In the event of a terrible concussion, or an illness that creates excess fluid in the brain though, it is not unlike shaking a can of coke till the weakest seal pops, which is VERY bad for the brain. If you can relieve the pressure ahead of time, it can save the life of the patient. Considering the dangers posed to ancient man, it is no wonder that they learned this technique pretty early on.

Modern day trenchings use a shunt so that the hole to the brain can be opened and closed as needed.



posted on Sep, 29 2006 @ 11:15 PM
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Thanks TL

I had no idea!!

Well I did about the modern process, it is very common in cases of severe Subdural Hematoma.

Semper



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 07:26 PM
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I am curious about "Remote Viewing". This is a proven technique of seeing things from a distance, with the mind only. The military has used it extensively. The law enforcement as well. It is said ANYONE can do it. Have they done any MRI testing during a remote viewing session?



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 08:15 PM
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LY

I actually posed that question in my initial interview with Doctor Mencken.

He was not unaware, and thought the idea of research into this, intriguing, but had no information of any studies that are or have been conducted.

I am also unable to find anything other than Kipplingers and Persingers research into Paranormal Psychosis.

Semper



posted on Oct, 2 2006 @ 08:16 AM
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we are going to be doing a more refined thread in the Research Forum.

If anyone is ineterested in participating; please u2u TONE23(me
)



posted on Oct, 2 2006 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by semperfortis

I am also unable to find anything other than Kipplingers and Persingers research into Paranormal Psychosis.

Semper


My "associate" is going to reproduce the Kipplinger and Persinger experiments this winter/next spring.

There is MUCH about to be done in this area, the funding is being placed and the facilities for the tests are being arranged. There is a very good possibility ATS may have some peripheral involvement with these studies as well. More as I get the details worked out.


Springer...



posted on Oct, 2 2006 @ 02:06 PM
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Springer,

I have just read their papers and it is amazing in a word.

The applicability of the (F)MRI in Kepplinger and Persinger's research is to my thinking full of potential.

Tone,

I'll get an answer to you this evening when I have time to absorb it a little...

Semper



posted on Oct, 3 2006 @ 11:36 PM
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for those that don't know about these links here they are.

wikipedia of human brain
"The human brain is the anteriormost part of the central nervous system in humans as well as the primary control center for the peripheral nervous system.

The brain controls "lower" or involuntary activities such as heartbeat, respiration, and digestion - these are known as autonomic functions- as well as sensation, movement, and a variety of special senses. The brain also controls "higher" order, conscious activities, such as thought, reasoning, and abstraction. The human brain is generally regarded as more capable of these higher order activities than that of any other known species."

frankiln institute?
"You have been entrusted with the care and feeding of the most extraordinary and complex creation in the universe. Home to your mind and personality, your brain houses your cherished memories and future hopes. It orchestrates the symphony of consciousness that gives you purpose and passion, motion and emotion.

But what do you really know about it?

Here you can get to know your brain – the food it likes, the challenges it craves, the rest it requires, the protection it deserves.

Within these pages you will find the fruit of decades of research. Here you can participate in today's neuroscience renaissance, and learn what you can do for your brain."

howstuffworks.com
"Every animal you can think of -- mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians -- all have brains. But the human brain is unique. It gives us the power to think, plan, speak, imagine... It is truly an amazing organ.

The brain performs an incredible number of tasks:

It controls body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate and breathing.
It accepts a flood of information about the world around you from your various senses (eyes, ears, nose, etc.).
It handles physical motion when walking, talking, standing or sitting.
It lets you think, dream, reason and experience emotions.
All of these tasks are coordinated, controlled and regulated by an organ that is about the size of a small head of cauliflower: your brain.
Your brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves make up a complex, integrated information-processing and control system. The scientific study of the brain and nervous system is called neuroscience or neurobiology. Because the field of neuroscience is so vast, and the brain and nervous system so complex, this article will start at the beginning and give you an overview of this amazing organ.

In this article, we will examine the structures of the brain and what each one does. With this general overview of the brain, you will be able to understand concepts such as motor control, visual processing, auditory processing, sensation, learning, memory and emotions, which we will cover in detail in future articles."

pbs on the brain?

navigable atlas of brain?
"Keith D. Sudheimer, Brian M. Winn, Jay M. Shoaps, Kristina K. Davis, Archibald J. Fobbs Jr., and John I. Johnson

Radiology Department, Communications Technology Laboratory, and College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University;

National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology

In this atlas you can view MRI sections through a living human brain as well as corresponding sections stained for cell bodies or for nerve fibers. The stained sections are from a different brain than the one which was scanned for the MRI images. Furthermore, for the stained sections, the brain was removed from the skull, dehydrated, embedded in celloidin, cut with a sliding microtome, passed through several staining and differentiating solutions, and mounted on glass slides. Each step of these procedures changed the shaped of the brain and of the sections. Therefore the stained sections will be quite a different size and shape than those of the MRI sections. Nevertheless, comparing MRI images with stained sections from approximately the same level can greatly increase understanding of the internal architecture of these brains."

harvard medical school?

oh man
I think i posted too much!!!!
I just gave myself a headache!


[edit on 4-10-2006 by tormentor]

[edit on 4-10-2006 by tormentor]



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