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John Lear's Moon Pictures on ATS

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posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 01:02 PM
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Strange, it wouldn't let me post another pic...

Here it is...

Zoomed and enhanced:




[edit on 30-1-2008 by rocksarerocks]




posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by rocksarerocks
 


Your Zoom pics don't open in the browser. But given that the original is quite fuzzy, do yiou really expect to be able to make out some new fantastic detail?



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by buddhasystem
reply to post by rocksarerocks
 


Your Zoom pics don't open in the browser. But given that the original is quite fuzzy, do yiou really expect to be able to make out some new fantastic detail?


No, please watch the video...I captured that from the video. The zoomed pictures are the best it's gonna get from that video.

[edit on 30-1-2008 by rocksarerocks]



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by rocksarerocks
 

The elongated darkness on the ground (L to R) appears to be a cast shadow (it bends with the terrain, and as it falls over the edge of a crater). If this is indeed so, it makes me wonder exactly how large the source object is, to be visible from earth . .



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by rocksarerocks
 


Hi rocksarerocks and welcome to ATS.

Since you have video consisting of many frames I would suggest using stacking software such as RegiStax which should give you an improved still image.

Maybe then a better analysis could be made.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by sherpa
reply to post by rocksarerocks
 


Hi rocksarerocks and welcome to ATS.

Since you have video consisting of many frames I would suggest using stacking software such as RegiStax which should give you an improved still image.

Maybe then a better analysis could be made.


Its off YouTube which is already horribly compressed, I'd love to see the original.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by rocksarerocks
 


Ah. I see your original post was misleading as it included this :

"By the way this is a video of a thing that i capture with meade lx 200 gps 10inc telescope on yhe moon seems to me
standing on its four legs it is the darkest obeject in the video I dont think you can miss it"

Which I thought was your statement.

Yes access to the original video is needed really.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 04:57 PM
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rocksarerocks did you took the video?

its interesting.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 08:56 PM
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Mildly entertaining


My best guess is that this was someone who photoshopped a moon image and then filmed it with their handycam. I like the simulation of the atmosphere distortion


They could have done a better job photoshopping the anomaly though. Shadows are a dead giveaway...




posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 09:23 PM
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The idiot part of me has spoken; I didn't even pay attention to light source, so busy pondering what kind of natural formation that could be, and why the shadow was so elongated sans heavy drama on the lighting. Nice catch, Zarniwoop.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by OptionToChoose
 


Thanks, OTC


I didn't notice an "idiot" side to your post at all... just some analysis, which is cool


Keep 'em coming



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by OptionToChoose
The idiot part of me has spoken; I didn't even pay attention to light source, so busy pondering what kind of natural formation that could be, and why the shadow was so elongated sans heavy drama on the lighting. Nice catch, Zarniwoop.


Zarniwoop (and others, like Internos) are extremely adept at image analysis. To be honest, you had me looking, too. So don't feel too bad.
I see nothing idiotic...

I have this saying that i kind of live by:

"He who would befriend another and lack the mercy to correct him is not ones friend, but rather his enemy"

Zarniwoop performed a merciful act for us all.
Good job, Zarniwoop.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Zarniwoop
 


I really don't see where the shadows goes wrong here ?
And why should the shadow go another direction even if it was a big anomaly object?





posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Thanks BFFT.

I've been to the cross-posted thread for this topic and another member, OSSkyWatcher, pointed out to me that the shadow in question could be caused by ridge, which appears to me to be a pretty good explanation ( that I missed
)



Now we have a natural ridge causing the shadow from the correct sunlight direction and further evidence that this is likely not a huge structure.



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by tep200377
reply to post by Zarniwoop
 


I really don't see where the shadows goes wrong here ?
And why should the shadow go another direction even if it was a big anomaly object?






I was pointing out that if that were a structure (at 3:00 in your large circle), it would cast a big right to left shadow in the same direction as the shadows cast by the crater rims... It doesn't, though.



posted on Jan, 31 2008 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by Orion437
rocksarerocks did you took the video?

its interesting.


No I didn't take this, I cross posted it. The quote if from the youtube page I visited with the video.



posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
Zarniwoop (and others, like Internos) are extremely adept at image analysis. To be honest, you had me looking, too. So don't feel too bad.
I see nothing idiotic...

I have this saying that i kind of live by:

"He who would befriend another and lack the mercy to correct him is not ones friend, but rather his enemy"

Zarniwoop performed a merciful act for us all.
Good job, Zarniwoop.


Thanks, dropped my guard for a minute, with BuddhaSystem, DenyTheFacts, and other sharp eyes on the prowl, I didn't think anyone would dare drop a deliberate phony at this point in this thread . .


On with the dust and ice particles!



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 04:21 AM
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Originally posted by OptionToChoose
with BuddhaSystem, DenyTheFacts, and other sharp eyes on the prowl, I didn't think anyone would dare drop a deliberate phony at this point in this thread . .

While it's great to have a pair of sharp eyes, they're not always perfect, as they can sometimes be misused if a slow brain refuses to believe what the sharp eyes see. Even the sharpest of eyes need to rely on educated guesses, at times, to interpret some pictures and images.

I'm always wary of people who seem to know everything. As far as I knew, anyone can gain sharp eyes from eating carrots, it's not like we all need a PhD to improve our vision.



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by tezzajw

I'm always wary of people who seem to know everything. As far as I knew, anyone can gain sharp eyes from eating carrots, it's not like we all need a PhD to improve our vision.


LOL....no kidding.

I guess we didn't have any "smart folks" before Ph D programs were invented.



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 08:34 AM
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If i'm correct, here we're looking at Clavius:


1-Clavius
2-Porter
3-Rutherford


Image credits:
F. Ringwald, processed by Scott Endler
Source:
zimmer.csufresno.edu...

www.lpi.usra.edu...
www.digital-flight.com...
www.higginsandsons.com...
Image credits: Wes Higgins

biol10.biol.umontreal.ca...
Image credits: biol.umontreal.ca

There's this interesting formation in this image taken by Tin Ka Ping Millennium Primary School:


I've also found this image in which is barely visible an apparently squared formation:

Image credits: Giorgio Mengoli
Image source: www.otticasanmarco.it...

www.lucamrecorder.de...
Image credits: Pete Lawrence


Imho, the formation that i've pointed with an arrow, in the video drops an already elongated shadow, and since the shadow is casted on a lower surface (Clavius' surface) there's a further elongation and this odd appearance. Pheraps the formation is this one

or a non-mapped odd-shaped ejecta formation,

Image source: The Moon Observer's Guide By Peter Grego

As always
, i'm not sure at all: i hope to find a hi res image somewhere...



[edit on 3/2/2008 by internos]




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