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John Lear's Moon Pictures on ATS

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posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 07:45 AM
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Thank you everyone. It is interesting to see where others come from, and how we are tied together...

Ignorant Ape, I notice that you claim the Moon has no atmosphere because the detail is "EXACT". Have you seen any photos lately of Venus? On a clear day if one looks directly down on the planet it is crystal clear, as if there is no atmosphere at all. But the reality is far different, so they tell us.

I think we can agree the Moon has an atmosphere, what kind is a matter of definition. And I see very little discussion in the way of the electrostatic effects of Moondust. I would imagine solar wind is a great role player, then outgassing and polar ice to mention a couple more. It is what they call, um, natrium, as opposed to just air...

Well, got to get some sleep now. Seems the old ways of thinking about the Moon are going to be tossed, as is the case with so many erroneous concepts we have...




posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by Matyas
I think we can agree the Moon has an atmosphere, what kind is a matter of definition. And I see very little discussion in the way of the electrostatic effects of Moondust. I would imagine solar wind is a great role player, then outgassing and polar ice to mention a couple more. It is what they call, um, natrium, as opposed to just air...


That is my whole point with the Aristarchus crater. We see plasma emissions, from my best estimation. The picture of Z helps affirm this, in my mind. The "glowies" we see are a representation of arcing.

I have been nagged by the thought of, if the "solar wind" is strong enough to decay orbits of large bodies, and the cumulative pressure emitted by it presses upon every surface in the solar system immensely, then why is Moon dust so loosely packed? Would the cumulative effect of this solar wind now create a more tightly packed soil? A mitigating factor in this effect that i can imagine is electrostatic in nature, along the same lines as what i believe is the primary causative factor of Martian dust storms. The weight of the conductive material in the soil is altered electromagnetically, and the charge separatoin provides a "lift". On Mars there is greater electrical activity (as the planet continues to seek homeostasis internally post cataclysm) and a high iron concentration in the soil so the effect is greatly exaggerated, and the more dense atmosphere provides further infrastructure this phenomenon.

We see a pockmarked surface, but have never witnessed an actual impact....so why the presumption that the craters are derived from impacts of matter rather than energy? We see all these rilles, but haven't witnessed the geological effects that cause them? There is nothing to support our current moon model, other than previous dogma.

90% of reality is Plasma...far exceeding the constituency of matter in the universe. There is absolutely no reason to believe that more physical matter is the primary causative factor in any phenomena that is not directly witnessed.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 01:41 PM
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I have been reading a thread just now by someone who seems to have captured on a childrens telescope by chance an explosive event on the Moon.

What I can't work out is the strange aftermath it left.

The event seems to have started with a flash followed by a black blast ring traveling out over the surface which has left two black patches.

What I am puzzling over is if this was an explosion distributing blast debris why would it accumulate and deposit in just two places ?, surely it should be evenly distributed would it not ?

link:


www.abovetopsecret.com...'



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by sherpa
What I am puzzling over is if this was an explosion distributing blast debris why would it accumulate and deposit in just two places ?, surely it should be evenly distributed would it not ?

link:


www.abovetopsecret.com...'


Not exactly. Consider the "blast rings" on Io. They form similar concentric circles.

This is an artifact of an electrically charged emission. The speed alone...

Perhaps one day we will all get to see a massive explosion as the plasma buildup around Aristarchus reaches critical mass and finally emits visible plasma filaments.



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Aristarchus is a plasma volcano...nah, jus' too weird



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 03:02 PM
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I was doing a little digging on Telescope prices and secifications becuase I was playing with the idea of buying one.

I have got to admit to knowing nothing about the subject but hit the trail with the thought that Mike's image was taken with a 10" scope.

During this process I came across something called a Meade LightBridge Dobsonian 16 Inch scope which seems to be very good value for the size.

Now this puppy is big I did not realise how big until I read a review written by somebody who bought a 12" model which included a picture of himself standing beside it.

Apparently the 16" version weighs 128lbs although because of it's struss construction can be stripped down for transport

It is armed with Mead optics which apparently have a good reputation and in the uk you can get one for £1099 delivered, I havn't looked if they are available in the usa or what they go for there.

Unfortunately I don't think I have the home location for one of these and I am not sure I want to be standing around on a remote country hillside to use it, however maybe this info is useful to anyone out there contemplating buying a scope.

I thought I had better add I have no connection with anyone or any company that sells these in case this looks like a cheap advertising shot.


There is a link here to one uk outlet selling these :


www.telescopehouse.co.uk...



[edit on 25-8-2007 by sherpa]



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 03:26 PM
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Originally posted by Matyas
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Aristarchus is a plasma volcano...nah, jus' too weird


I am of the opinion that all volcano's are electrically generated. Earthquakes, too.

But you know that, don't you.



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 03:44 PM
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Ah.. can't add a photo on edit to my post so here it is here, nice isn't it ?





posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 03:52 PM
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Hi everyone, I just wanted to introduce myself as a newbie to ATS.I'm posting in this thread because I am very interested in what Mr. Lear has to say.
I've listened to 8 parts of a radio interview which Mr. Hoagland was part of.
I need to go back and listen to the other 4? parts.
I love the photographs and I may have a couple that have not been posted here.I'll double check before posting them to avoid redundancy.
My area of knowledge isn't based on the moon topic but my curiousity is peaked.
I have a decent telescope and camera, I just need a mount to tie them together, although I've good luck doing it freehand.
This place is fascinating and I look forward to contributing to this thread and others.
Peace



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by citizen truth
 



Hi citizen,

Welcome to ATS, what is your source for the photo's you intend to post are they your own or from Nasa/ us navy ?



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 04:27 PM
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The photos are not mine.I found them on (wish I had bookmarked the site) I believe the lunar and planetary site.I can't remember the exact name and can't find the link.I had it last night and loaded the pictures a few months back.I also went to NASA to cross reference and I do believe the picture is there.I need to double check this to make sure.I remember the alternate being an airbrushed/photoshopped version on NASA.
It's a picture of a huge spacecraft supposedly, taken during an Apollo 17 flight.
It's really confusing because my original source labeled it as Apollo 20.
I also have an over head shot of two building sites but I cannot verify these as original.
I'm sure those more knowledgeable could tell real from fake.The spaceship one looks homogenous though.



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by citizen truth
 



If it is Apollo 20 than I suggest you do a search here at ats on this or William Rutledge.

If it is Apollo 17 than the only anomaly I have read about regarding this mission involves South Massif.

Link here:

keithlaney.net...



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 05:14 PM
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Thanks for the guidance on Apollo 20.I found what I was looking for and apparently it has been posted already.
I don't know the position of the building sites in the other photo so it may be useless in trying to verify the pictures until my brain jogs.



posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by sherpa...here it is here, nice isn't it ?

Good Lord, what a sweet machine!

Now are you actually purchasing this or just thinking about it?

And if you are the lucky suitor, I have a few areas of interest you could point it at...



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by Matyas
 


Well like I said toying with the idea, there a few practicalities to think about.

The scope alone is not sufficient to get the job done, I would need to buy a respectable digital camera, a luna filter and possibly an adapter to mount the camera, again this is completely new to me so there could be other components I don't know about.

I live in a small house with no real storage that could cope with something this large unless of course I didn't mind sitting looking at it all the time.

I am in a town so light pollution would be a consideration, if deployed in my courtyard the view is hemmed in so the viewing envelope is restricted.

I could of course get out into a rural location but it is not something I like the thought of on my own.

The ideal arrangement would be to find a confederate with the same interest, A to maybe share the cost, ie them providing the camera and me providing the scope. and B to help breaking it down and reassembling on site.

An option I have considered is maybe finding a local astronomical club to get a little help from but I think the moment they found out what I was looking for would alienate me, so have brushed that aside.

So as you can see a lot of considerations.

As to areas of interest, yes I bet you do..



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by sherpa
reply to post by Matyas
 


Well like I said toying with the idea, there a few practicalities to think about.

The scope alone is not sufficient to get the job done, I would need to buy a respectable digital camera, a luna filter and possibly an adapter to mount the camera, again this is completely new to me so there could be other components I don't know about.

I live in a small house with no real storage that could cope with something this large unless of course I didn't mind sitting looking at it all the time.

I am in a town so light pollution would be a consideration, if deployed in my courtyard the view is hemmed in so the viewing envelope is restricted.

I could of course get out into a rural location but it is not something I like the thought of on my own.

The ideal arrangement would be to find a confederate with the same interest, A to maybe share the cost, ie them providing the camera and me providing the scope. and B to help breaking it down and reassembling on site.

An option I have considered is maybe finding a local astronomical club to get a little help from but I think the moment they found out what I was looking for would alienate me, so have brushed that aside.

So as you can see a lot of considerations.

As to areas of interest, yes I bet you do..


Get Photoshop, too, so you can layer the images and create more hi res images of specific areas.

I have a million plans. Buying a scope is one of them. One day the kids will be grown.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 05:24 AM
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Originally posted by sherpa
The scope alone is not sufficient to get the job done...


Yup, and if you want timed exposures you'll need to have a tracking system.


An option I have considered is maybe finding a local astronomical club to get a little help from but I think the moment they found out what I was looking for would alienate me, so have brushed that aside.


You gotta be kiddin' me! Those folks are jus' as wacky as we are! They come from all walks of life...



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Matyas
 


And there was me with my finger hovering over the "buy now " button, I read somewhere exposure time was 2-3 secs for the moon so I suppose that would mean tracking yes.

Really makes me wonder if I am the right man for the job, no photography and astronomy background, lousy location the only thing I have going for me is I'm nuts !


The astronomy club thing , yeah I guess I could test the waters especially if there is the odd "loony" there.

I know absente has booked some Russian observatory time in November and I wonder if it might be better to wait and see what he comes up with.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by sherpa
And there was me with my finger hovering over the "buy now " button,


That reminds me of a Prairie Home Companion skit, where this fella pours a concrete slab for his patio as a family project, then the brother-in-law comes over and says, "And you got the grade right?" to which the fella's first immediate thought is "What grade?" Then it rains two days later.

Not to worry, sometimes you can build your own. If youse gots no experience, this would be a great time to take up a new hobby, doncha think? I am certain those amateur astronomers weren't born with scopes stuck to their faces!

Speaking of which, you are not going to loose it just because you are hanging around some people with a little more experience than you. If anything, the less experienced will start coming to you!

Sheesh. Get out there and get your feet wet, you'll never regret it, I promise!



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by Matyas
 



Good pep talk, thanks.

It's not the wet feet I am bothered about it's the light wallet..



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