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Whats in a name? (more than we think!)

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posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 08:50 AM
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I've often wondered how a nation (not its people) that claims to be based on Judeo/Christian values, and often screams blasphemy when confronted with anything that questions those values, can square itself against the obvious non christian designations used by its own space agency.
NASA, over its many missions, has included the names Apollo, Gemini, and Orion to name a few. These are among the greatest accomplishments in history, and they pay no homage to the originating country's predominant faith. Could there be more to these choices than there appears?

the CHALLENGER COLUMBIA ENDEAVOURs for the DISCOVERY of ATLANTIS





posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:34 AM
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Or Atlantis Columbia endeavours for the discovery of a challenger. Words only have meaning if you put meaning into them - you can find anything if you choose to find it.

Anyway, the Greek gods' and goddesses' names are cool.


[edit on 13/9/06 by Xar Ke Zeth]



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:39 AM
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Saturn, Ares...and the list could go on and on



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:41 AM
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Well this is becasue your country is supposed to seperate government and religion and it seems as if Nasa is. These names are more based upon what are seen today as myths. Tales of great achievment, which is what nasa is aiming for if they can get there act together.



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by Peruvianmonk
Well this is becasue your country is supposed to seperate government and religion and it seems as if Nasa is. These names are more based upon what are seen today as myths. Tales of great achievment, which is what nasa is aiming for if they can get there act together.

exactly my point Pmonk
except instead of seperation, we seem to find inclusion.

did anyone catch my hint of 'squaring itself'?

[edit on 13-9-2006 by Fifth Horseman]



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:54 AM
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Well think about it -

What it the Challenger was named the Messiah when it exploded?

What if Apollo 13 was the Jehovah?

That would probably freak a lot of people out!



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by GENERAL EYES
Well think about it -

What it the Challenger was named the Messiah when it exploded?

What if Apollo 13 was the Jehovah?

That would probably freak a lot of people out!


Yes, I have thought about it and so has NASA. Considerable thought has gone into the naming of these by someone. Who and Why? I've read that all five shuttles were named for famous ships. Is there a particular reason for including foreign deities in our mission nomenclature? Why no Allah or Vishna. Is it safe to only use the names of "dead" gods, or is it something more..on the level..so to speak



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 11:34 AM
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Is it really that important to you what the names are? I don't understand why it should be isn't the mission what counts?



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 01:23 PM
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does anyone notice the symbology present, do you think this is innocent? You're right ,the mission is important, so important it deserves "proper" naming



[edit on 13-9-2006 by Fifth Horseman]



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 02:15 PM
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Let's see...Mercury were the first manned space flight missions. Mercury is the first planet in the solar system.

Gemini (the twins) were the first missions carrying a two man crew.

The Apollo missions were to establish the US preeminence in space and named for the preeminent object in the solar system. Or at least the Greek name for the sun god. I think naming the Apollo missions the SUN missions may have been a bit misleading.

So actually I think the names are appropriate, inspiring, and cool. But then I grew up in that time period and can remember the teachers bringing a TV in to school so we could watch the launches.

"Non-Christian"? So what?



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
Let's see...Mercury were the first manned space flight missions. Mercury is the first planet in the solar system.

Gemini (the twins) were the first missions carrying a two man crew.

The Apollo missions were to establish the US preeminence in space and named for the preeminent object in the solar system. Or at least the Greek name for the sun god. I think naming the Apollo missions the SUN missions may have been a bit misleading.

So actually I think the names are appropriate, inspiring, and cool. But then I grew up in that time period and can remember the teachers bringing a TV in to school so we could watch the launches.

"Non-Christian"? So what?


Mercury, patron of the alchemists (whose into alchemy nowadays?)
Gemini, Castor and Pollux, sons of Zeus and a mortal women (Nephi...)
Apollo, sun god also known as Phoebus (the shining one) father of the stunt driver Phaeton who flung his fathers "chariot" to and fro until he froze and then burnt the earth


Yes there are innocent answers as well as not so innocent ones



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by Fifth Horseman
Yes there are innocent answers as well as not so innocent ones


Absolutely. Much like there are correct answers as well as incorrect ones. You see what you believe. You spot what you're focused on looking for.

Maybe.



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 04:47 PM
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I appreciate the responses from all of you, they are interesting

I hope to lay further framework of my discussion later tonight.



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 05:01 PM
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Well, were a secular nation, and naming them after various people in
Christianity would'nt be a good idea, and in general theres not any
names that are actually cool.

Why do we use the names of the Greek Pantheon of gods, well thats
easy, apart from the fact that they sound cool, they are Greek,
and the Greeks were the firstgreat western civilization.


As to who choose the names, I'm not sure, but I'm willing to bet it's
a group of people who democratically vote on one.


apc

posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:21 PM
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We're talking about geeks here people. You should see what most computer nerds name their boxes.

These are all names about ancient mythos dealing with the "heavens" above. So they are quite appropriate.

And finally, there is no such thing as "seperation of church and state" in the way being described. There could be a Christian cross in front of the White House and no law would be broken.



posted on Sep, 13 2006 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by Fifth Horseman

did anyone catch my hint of 'squaring itself'?

[edit on 13-9-2006 by Fifth Horseman]


Yes I saw that...

I also noticed this




Is it safe to only use the names of "dead" gods, or is it something more..on the level..so to speak


Are you trying to suggest that Mason's had something to do with naming the spaceships?


jra

posted on Sep, 14 2006 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by Fifth Horseman
NASA, over its many missions, has included the names Apollo, Gemini, and Orion to name a few. These are among the greatest accomplishments in history, and they pay no homage to the originating country's predominant faith. Could there be more to these choices than there appears?


And a lot of the names NASA uses arn't related to Greek gods. But because a lot of our basic astronomy comes from what the Greeks and Romans learnt, and that we still use Latin in the sciences. I think that has an affect in the naming choices. All our planets have Roman names because that's what the Romans named them and they've stuck. So it seems logical to me to name space craft and probes after mythical gods and famous astronomers. I think it gives this stuff a more classical feel. There is usually a connection or a relation to use a particular name as well. I can't think of any names from figures in Christianity that I could use to connect or relate to a space project or vehicle.

I really don't think it's any more complicated then that. Plus lots of other companies use Greek and Roman names.


the CHALLENGER COLUMBIA ENDEAVOURs for the DISCOVERY of ATLANTIS


Is that even grammatically correct though? Plus all the Shuttles are named after early exploration saling ships.



posted on Sep, 14 2006 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by Ezekiel

Originally posted by Fifth Horseman

did anyone catch my hint of 'squaring itself'?

[edit on 13-9-2006 by Fifth Horseman]


Yes I saw that...

I also noticed this




Is it safe to only use the names of "dead" gods, or is it something more..on the level..so to speak


Are you trying to suggest that Mason's had something to do with naming the spaceships?


(gasping) do you have any evidence to support such claims Ezekiel?





many many more...



posted on Sep, 14 2006 @ 11:00 AM
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Ohh, man. That video was just....wow. When you sprinkle enough truth amongst conjecture and paranoid delusion you can create something that looks almost plausible. Especially if you already buy into the basic premise.

This kind of stuff will play well to people who either have no clue whatsoever, or are already convinced of the nefarious goings-on of Masonry and/or NASA. I'd be shocked (and dismayed) if anyone who has taken the time to look into these topics and remains on the fence, was swayed by this stuff.

Yes, Jack Parsons was definitely "out there". We used Nazis in the space program. Operation Paperclip is an aknowledged fact. Some of the astronauts were Masons. Cobble all that together with some very broad assumption and speculation, and there you go.

Not being a Mason myself, I have no particular skin in this game other than being saddened by the attempts to portray some true American heroes (speaking of the astronauts here) as something other than what they actually are, or were.

Planted a Masonic flag on the Moon to claim it for the Masons? You gotta be freakin' kidding me.

But hey, what the (bleep) do I know?



posted on Sep, 14 2006 @ 11:54 AM
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What assumptions or speculations do you find troubling? Did that man not have a masonic flag on the moon? Is there any reason to have that in space other than ritual? Every item aboard that ship is accounted for as total shipping weight is important to figure fuel and other reserves. Am I portraying them as anything other than what they are/were? What please? Could you please tell me how this is seperation of religion/gov't? After the phrase "the eagle has landed" the response is "ya got a bunch of guys about to turn blue". Hmmp.
Please be critical but not blind. To understand something we must be willing to see its entirety.

'What the bleep' is wonderful. Check out 'The Secret




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