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Megalodon will we ever see it again?

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posted on Dec, 8 2006 @ 04:52 PM
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I agree with everyone above, in not knowing what exactly lurks in the depths of our oceans. I think the discovery of a living Megalodon would be wicked awesome...for lack of a more educated words. I read "Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror" when I was younger. It was a fictional novel about the discovery of a Megalodon in the depths of an ocean trench. It was an amusing read, and would probably be the closest we could get to actually discovering a Megalodon on this very day.




posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 04:34 AM
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The "Meg" series by Steve Alten is actually pretty entertaining reading. If nothing else it certainly offers some plausible possibilities.

I suppose the REAL question is if we did see it again, how many folks would go into the water? Current Great White sharks are scary enough - who could deal with this?




[edit on 27-12-2006 by H82CAGE]



posted on Mar, 26 2007 @ 04:21 PM
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Isn't that supposed to be a large shark? Well, you see, I would imagine so that it would still exist if it is not DEAD, I mean, we have a wast ocean. Besides, the Megamouth Shark wasn't discovered until 1971 or so...it was just so rare...it lived so deep.



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 07:59 PM
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posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 10:49 AM
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I think that megalodon is still alive im a place that no one knows ! im only 11& you guys think that imm not helping ! but i've been reseaching facts & videos about megalodon& some people think it doesnt exsist i understand how people think that well ! the world may never know ! maybe megalodon is REAL !.



posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 08:30 PM
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The megalodon still might be alive ! we don't know, scientist believe they might be living in the deep deep ocean.



posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by Anonymous ATS
 


I'm going to call bull on that one. Megalodon's are the ancestors of Great Whites. and the possibility exits fro the White's to grow to a very large size, based on their food source, actually.
And, since they are related, we pretty much must assume they had similar behaviour.
Great whites don't dive deep for food, they are surface hunters. Many sharks are, actually. The species of sharks that hunt in the deep are either really slow, or really... unique looking. It's unlikely, since evidence points towards the Meg's feeding on early whales for the most part, that megs had any inclination to dive deep. Most of their fossils are found in what used to be shallow seas, though some have been found at depths, it's true, it's more likely their habitats were warm, coastal waters and shallow seas. So you'd be more likely to find a Meg in the Bahamas or of the coast of Florida... (near me) than



posted on Aug, 22 2008 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by mindlessinsanity
 


How could anyone know what depth a megaladon frequented.



posted on Jan, 11 2009 @ 09:21 AM
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i belive the megalondon willl come when its ready from the ocean deep is waiting but is it ready?!?



posted on Feb, 20 2009 @ 12:09 AM
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It really seems impossible that Megaldon survived the mass extinction because it was limited to warm shallow seas and it didn't have any specializations to survive in the frigid waters of the deep.




posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 10:01 AM
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I think that i've found the video from the cage


myparanormallife.blogspot.com...

very impressive



posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 03:24 PM
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All i want to know is how do u know evolution didnt change its eating habits i mean we dont understand evolution completely and we never will we may never know if the megladon is still alive or what not and how can we say something id dead or not the t-rex isnt dead like someone said it evolved and maybe maybe not happened to the megladon but lets hope for god sake that it did cuz if it didnt well my friends i can tell you i wouldnt ever go swimming again



posted on Apr, 28 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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So, for those of you saying you would not enter the water, well, frankly the fact of the matter is you would be too small of a prey item for the Meg to eat you. On another note, like many people have said, this creature would have lived in shallow water close to a high amount of viable prey items. For those who don't know, more of said prey items would have been in the shallow seas. Remember, this was a time where the deeper seas where avoided even by the meg because of even larger predators. The Meg has evolved, proof is in the bone structure and tooth shape of a great white. It is a scaled down version of a Meg. For those who argue it is in the deep part of the oceans, well it would not have much prey down there. Sorry to say, but it couldn't survive on the small fish down there. On top of that, if it were to still be around, something of that size would show up on the radar of submarines that are constantly patrolling the ocean, also with all the deep sea expeditions, it is nearly impossible for one to be alive if it has not been seen or caught on radar yet.



posted on Apr, 28 2012 @ 04:55 AM
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As someone else said, the closest living relative to the Megalodon is the Great White.
Megalodon is said to have become extinct over 28 million years ago.
Since civilization has developed, and technology has become more sophisticated, you would have thought there would be records of sightings of a huge dorsal fin, unexplainable bite/teeth marks in water dwelling mammal remains (I think it goes without saying that the Meg would feast upon large marine mammals like Orcas and whales), you'd probably see a massive decline in large marine populations. I honestly don't think there is enough food to sustain such a massive predator, and I don't see how such a large predator would go unnoticed.




C. megalodon had enough behavioral flexibility to inhabit wide range of marine environments (i.e. coastal shallow waters,[34] coastal upwelling,[34] swampy coastal lagoons,[34] sandy littorals,[34] and offshore deep water environments[11]), and exhibited a transient life-style.[34] Adult C. megalodon were not abundant in shallow water environments,[34] and mostly lurked offshore. C. megalodon may have moved between coastal and oceanic waters, particularly in different stages in its life cycle.
Wiki Link

I know Wikipedia is not the Holy Grail of all knowledge, but they base these theories on the behaviour of it's closest relative.
I realise we don't know everything about what lives in the sea, but you would imagine, that if Meg was still alive, it would be difficult for him to live in deep waters unless there were A: Many places for it to go, since it is a wanderer, it would have to have many deep places to go, and not be limited to one area, B: The area it inhabited would have to have a very large amount of food for it to remain in that one area.
We know that there are many deep sea Giant squid, and that would probably be the only food we would suspect Meg would eat. And since we know that the sea is abundant in squid, we can assume that they are not being hounded by a voracious mega shark.



posted on Apr, 28 2012 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by Anonymous ATS
 


Wait, what? What are you saying? You're contradicting yourself with all your "Megalodon may be alive, and he's waiting but is he ready?" and then saying "He couldn't have survived the mass extinction because of the drop in water temperatures"

I don't believe scientists think anything like "It might be living in deeper seas" for the reasons I have stated in my previous post. I'm no scientist, and I think I can logically reason and successfully hypothesize that the Meg is not alive, and not living in deep waters.

Aside from the fact you're being a bit spammy with your posts, what opinion do you hold?
edit on 28-4-2012 by Lulzaroonie because: (no reason given)






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