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Emergency Broadcast System tests.....

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posted on Sep, 5 2006 @ 11:44 AM
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Ok, maybe it's just me because I am using a lot of vacation time right now and am home in the day with the TV on, but it seems like there is a ton of EBS (actually EAS for emergency alert system now) tests lately. I think I have heard about 4 or 5 in the last month, plus one on the radio. Two on TV (PBS Kids channel of all things) in the last week. I was wondering if anyone knew how often they are supposed to be tested. I did some checking and found some interesting info about the system, but nothing about tests schedules. I am sure if I dig deep or long enough on the net I could find something. I just though someone might know, or if anyone else has noticed this.

I just find it odd that there have been so many lately. I don't even remember that many in the early 80's when we were afraid of the Russians nuking us.


en.wikipedia.org...

www.911broadcast.com...


Edit, looks like the new EAS is tested weekly and/or monthly. Still seems like I am hearing it more then I used too, but again I am home in the days more between vacations and late shifts.


[edit on 5-9-2006 by Sr Wing Commander]




posted on Sep, 6 2006 @ 06:29 AM
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EBS tests have been at least weekly events over the past 5 years. In some areas, they are more than once weekly. Its been like this for a while, at least since 2004.



posted on Sep, 6 2006 @ 07:58 AM
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Yes, I've noticed a higher rate of this on the PBS kid's channel as well.
It actually scares my 3-year old when he's watching it when it goes off during his program.
He comes tearing through the house like his pants are on fire to find me screaming...."oh no oh no.....get me mommy."



posted on Sep, 6 2006 @ 09:21 AM
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I've noticed a lot more emergency broadcast tests too...

What I find weird is that, with all this testing, I don't recall hearing any emergency broadcast system alerts on 9/11, and I'm in Manhattan! I had to watch CNN with everybody else to find out what was going on. I would think that, if ever there were a need for it, it would have been on 9/11.

*sits tinfoil hat firmly on head*

What if they're really using those messages to throw some kind of brainwaves at us, for mind control?

*removes hat"

We have to consider all possibilities, you know...




posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by Sr Wing Commander
I just though someone might know, or if anyone else has noticed this.


Every radio and TV station in the US is required to perform a weekly and monthly EAS test. Every market has a primary EAS station which sends the signal to all the other stations down the line. You can call your local radio station's chief engineer to find out who the primary is and when the RMT (required monthly test) is scheduled. The primary usually posts the times on their website.

All the stations are audited on their compliance to the EAS standards every three years to retain the broadcasting license. This means that all the tests must be logged and signed by the engineer on site. 9-11, the hurricanes, and the Amber Alert laws make sure that EAS must function to protect the community.

If you are seeing the test, you know that it is working in your area. That is a good thing indeed.

You can find all this information via the FCC or buy the local radio or TV engineer lunch to get the details in your area. They are usually eager to get a free lunch or beer and tell you everything you have ever wanted to know about broadcasting in your area.

[edit on 7-9-2006 by xman_in_blackx]



posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by xman_in_blackx
If you are seeing the test, you know that it is working in your area. That is a good thing indeed.


That's what I thought, until I looked back and realized that I hadn't seen it on 9/11. Why would that be?

I really want to know and that's why I'm asking you: you seem to know a lot about this.



posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 01:00 AM
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The E.A.S. system here is usually tested twice a week. There are sometimes where it is tested everyday. It does get a little nerve racking sometimes because it goes on for a few minutes.

You would come to expect this here because of the major chemical facilities we have here in the Kanawha Valley.

Unfortunately, most people do not listen to the system is broadcasting because of the number of times it get's tested each week.



posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 01:08 AM
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Originally posted by gimmefootball400
most people do not listen to the system is broadcasting because of the number of times it get's tested each week.


You have to go out of your way to hear it?

Here, it breaks through on the tv, I think, so whatever you're watching gets interrupted. If it doesn't work that way, then I must have the bad luck of catching it on every channel, bc I see/hear it a few times a week. I hate it, but I can see how it would be useful.



posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
That's what I thought, until I looked back and realized that I hadn't seen it on 9/11. Why would that be?


There are only a couple of reasons why it didn't work on that day:

1. the primary was not able to relay the signal.
2. a secondary relay failed.
3. there was no signal to relay.

It could have been either equipment failure, lack of connectivity to the signal of origin or lack of original signal. The chain was broken somewhere along the line.

Either way, I am pretty sure that is EXACTLY why the FCC goes crazy over EAS compliance now. On the day it should have worked... it didn't.

Only those who send the originating signal know the answer to that question.

It is possible that it wasn't needed. Every station went to a national news source of one kind or another during that day. No one cared about needing permission to rebroadcast that day. Small and large markets alike rebroadcast national news sources as soon as they could get it connected. By the time a C&D would arrive, the event would be over anyway and regular broadcasts would resume.

Everyone realized on that day how much we are all really connected to each other.



posted on Sep, 9 2006 @ 08:35 PM
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Originally posted by xman_in_blackx

Originally posted by HarlemHottie
That's what I thought, until I looked back and realized that I hadn't seen it on 9/11. Why would that be?


There are only a couple of reasons why it didn't work on that day:

1. the primary was not able to relay the signal.
2. a secondary relay failed.
3. there was no signal to relay.

It could have been either equipment failure, lack of connectivity to the signal of origin or lack of original signal. The chain was broken somewhere along the line.

Either way, I am pretty sure that is EXACTLY why the FCC goes crazy over EAS compliance now. On the day it should have worked... it didn't.

Only those who send the originating signal know the answer to that question.

It is possible that it wasn't needed. Every station went to a national news source of one kind or another during that day. No one cared about needing permission to rebroadcast that day. Small and large markets alike rebroadcast national news sources as soon as they could get it connected. By the time a C&D would arrive, the event would be over anyway and regular broadcasts would resume.

Everyone realized on that day how much we are all really connected to each other.


I beleive the wiki article I linked too stated no EAS was broadcast on 9/11.



posted on Sep, 9 2006 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by Sr Wing Commander
I beleive the wiki article I linked too stated no EAS was broadcast on 9/11.


You linked to the Emergency Broadcast System, which was replaced by the Emergency Alert System in 1997. The EBS was not in use in 2001. The tidbit about 9/11 is on the page about the EAS.


Several state officials including New York Governor George Pataki, former New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and U.S. Congressmen and Senators have questioned members of the FCC on why the Emergency Alert System was not implemented nationwide on radio and television stations during the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks where official government information is/was supposed to be distributed in place of local/network programming or newscasts. The EAS was to have issued such messages that the United States was under attack, but no warning broadcast was issued, even in New York City.


So, again, my question is, how weird is that?!



posted on Sep, 9 2006 @ 09:43 PM
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It wasn't used because it would only contribute to public panic.

The public were informed via the TV networks as well as radio stations.

As far as attacks go, this was extremely limited in scope and was over before anyone knew what was happening.

How would you feel about seeing an EAS messsage saying that the United States was under attack? The EAS is a nationwide, federally run communications "thing" that pre-empts all local and network programming. Personally I can't see the beneficial factors in preempting local newscasts in places like South Dakota or Oregon.

It was the correct decision in my opinion.



posted on Sep, 9 2006 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by Nerdling
It wasn't used because it would only contribute to public panic...

How would you feel about seeing an EAS messsage saying that the United States was under attack?


Well, no. I would have felt infinitely safer hearing an official, governmental response. Instead, we watched the towers fall a zillion times, and heard reporters panicking. Way to induce PTSD. I don't think that helped morale too much either.



posted on Sep, 10 2006 @ 10:38 PM
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That reminds me, we haven't had a test of the system here within the last two weeks. Maybe we have one coming up.



posted on Feb, 7 2007 @ 12:50 AM
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I started this thread a few months back and noticed the tests went on pretty much regular.

Then tonight, there have been over 10 tests the last hour, and it must be by the cable provider, because it's been on every channel.

My guess is someone has the test setting orders looped or somthing, because it would be seriously wierd for it to be tested 10 times in one hour.



posted on Feb, 7 2007 @ 12:57 AM
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Are you ready for something weird. It came across my television not so long ago. I was shocked what I heard and in total disblief.

After the test was completed an announcement came on and said this is for all The United States and Texas. Thats right, and Texas. What? What did I just hear? Why did they say all of the United States and Texas. Did something happen that I dont know about to Texas?



posted on Feb, 7 2007 @ 01:08 AM
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Well, Texas is like, "a whole other country" so maybe they just wanted to make sure you all were listening.


Boomer Sooner!!!!!!!!!

Seriously though, that is a little wierd. I turned the TV off, but maybe it's still going on.



posted on Feb, 7 2007 @ 02:39 AM
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I know STARZ and all of its lower channels like STARZ Fam,STARZ in Black and STARZ Comedy channels all go off air at the same time usually once a week for about a 1/2 to 1 hr for Emergency broadcast testing on Time Warner cable. Usually most just do a test for like 1min or so.



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