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Thermocouple Ponderings...

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posted on Sep, 2 2006 @ 07:16 PM
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For a time I have wondered what it would take to get "free energy". I then concluded that this wasn't likely to be discovered by me. So I pondered what it would take to make things more efficient with energy. Or to return spent energy. And I stumbled upon an idea of thermocouples within a house. Houses have heat from furnaces. Quite simple. Would it be possible to use batteries of thermocouples around houses to create a significant amount of electricity by using the ambient temperature as a way to absorb some heat energy that would just be wasted and put elsewhere?




posted on Sep, 2 2006 @ 07:43 PM
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DARKPRO
Thermocouples as you would know are basically 2 dissimilar metals that exhibit a principle of thermovoltaic properties, which means the hotter the joint gets the higher the milli volts at the terminal ends. Typically your looking at 50mV for 1250 C at the joint for a type K thermocouple so as you can see the energy is pretty well useless as the 50mV when connected to a low inpedance meter will drop off to nothing-> meaning there is absolutely no grunt behind this principle and hence the reason its only ever used to measure temperature.
Now this is the good bit, there are unlimited variants of metal alloys and its possible that one configuration of these metals does produce a large output so dont be disheartened by my earlier rant, I have worked with thermocouples for 20+ years now and its often crossed my mind the potential for this principle to produce unlimited free power if the right alloys were employed.



posted on Sep, 2 2006 @ 08:15 PM
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If I remember correctly thermocouples use different alloys to produce an electric current. As far as I can remember the difference in heat conduction/absorbtion causes a current to pass between the two allows. Using what little logic I have, I have t oinfer that the strength of the current is affected by the difference in heat conduction. HEnce, the greater the distance, the greater the current. Is this correct?



 
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