It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Question of Earth's Magnetic Field!

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 30 2006 @ 09:30 PM
link   
So we have the Earth's atmosphere rotating with the Earth. Otherwise if you jump, you'd probably land a few feet away from the point of take off.

Now the question is, does the Earth's magnetic field also rotate with the planet?
Think again!!

The answer a little later. AND guys, no Googling please or this thread is screwed!!




posted on Aug, 30 2006 @ 09:31 PM
link   
Yes, I think you might be thinking about the gravity.

news.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Aug, 30 2006 @ 09:58 PM
link   

Originally posted by trIckz_R_fO_kIdz
Yes, I think you might be thinking about the gravity.



Nope!

Is there any discernible relationship between gravity and magnetism?

No, but there are discernible relationships between the electrostatic and the weak nuclear forces. All three have been united under the common banner of the electroweak force.




[edit on 30-8-2006 by mikesingh]



posted on Aug, 31 2006 @ 01:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by mikesingh
No, but there are discernible relationships between the electrostatic and the weak nuclear forces. All three have been united under the common banner of the electroweak force.


Not according to Wikipedia.
en.wikipedia.org...
(and also en.wikipedia.org... )

I also scanned a dozen or so papers on electroweak forces... don't see any tying gravity and magnetism -- at least not in this universe. i see some theoretical work in a Godel universe, but that's an artifical mathematical universe and not a real one.



posted on Aug, 31 2006 @ 01:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by mikesinghNow the question is, does the Earth's magnetic field also rotate with the planet?

No.

The rotation generates the magnetic force, of course, but the field doesn't rotate at all. It doe flucturate.


Think again!!

Didn't have to. This is elementary earth science... have known this one for decades.



posted on Sep, 1 2006 @ 01:42 AM
link   
Ok Byrd, You're the intelligent guy. This question was basically for the non tech fellas like me!!


So for those who want to delve deeper into the magnetic field of the planet, then here's the link.

www.geocities.com...



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 03:37 AM
link   

Not according to Wikipedia.


Yo dude Wikipedia is not correct people can change anything at any given moment so it cant be trusted, if you use it in school thats okay ull never get an "A" but dont use it as a referance for these forums it just doesnt work.



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 06:15 AM
link   
Thats completely untrue! Wikipedia is in the large a very accurate source of information.

In fact, Im currently an undergrad and the chemistry labs have been running the same experiment for several years and have never got results predicted by the text book, and have always got very similar results every time. When the lab tech looked the figure up on wikipedia it was closer to the experimental value than the textbook. I know it sounds stupid but thats a true story!



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 06:15 AM
link   
Wikipedia is good for science information and can easily be fact-checked via the references at the bottom of the page.



n fact, Im currently an undergrad and the chemistry labs have been running the same experiment for several years and have never got results predicted by the text book, and have always got very similar results every time. When the lab tech looked the figure up on wikipedia it was closer to the experimental value than the textbook. I know it sounds stupid but thats a true story!


the Wiki is great for Chemistry, though not for the more specialized kinds of chemistry unfortunately...

[edit on 4-9-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Sep, 11 2006 @ 07:15 AM
link   
The field flips sometimes too,and should happen sometime in the future.
North will become South!!and things will get weird.Today the field is about 10 percent weaker than it was when German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss first began measuring it in 1845.

www.psc.edu...



posted on Sep, 17 2006 @ 01:21 AM
link   

Originally posted by Byrd

Not according to Wikipedia.
en.wikipedia.org...
(and also en.wikipedia.org... )

I also scanned a dozen or so papers on electroweak forces... don't see any tying gravity and magnetism -- at least not in this universe. i see some theoretical work in a Godel universe, but that's an artifical mathematical universe and not a real one.


The electroweak and the strong nuclear force are united under GUT's (Grand Unified Theories) but gravity isn't. However, GUT's points towards gravity being unified with all the other forces but to fully understand how they'll need a law of Quantum Gravity and they're a little short on coming up with that one, just yet. The unification does occur in this universe, but only under certain conditions of density and temperature..... as do all the other forces. As a matter of fact, gravity doesn't start to become united with the other forces until densities reach >10^40kgs/cm^2 and temps reach 100 trillion degrees. Size also reaches to about the Planck scale length of 10^-43cm before this happens. The closer you approach zero point, the temp goes off the scale and so does the density...... it becomes asymptotic.



posted on Sep, 17 2006 @ 06:28 AM
link   
I would say the magnetic field rotates with the Earth. The magnetic field is generated by earth iself, right? If the earth rotates than I'd think that it rotates to
The magnetic field flips every few thousand years


Also


So we have the Earth's atmosphere rotating with the Earth. Otherwise if you jump, you'd probably land a few feet away from the point of take off.

No you wouldn't, the Earth is rotating at a fixed rate not constantly accelerating, so you'd travel with the earth


[edit on 17-9-2006 by PisTonZOR]



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join