Yugo AK-47

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posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 04:18 PM
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So what's the deal with Yugo Ak-47's? Are they any good? I saw one that looked pretty nice for around $400.00. They dont fall apart or anything do they?

[edit on 18-8-2006 by Full_Auto77]




posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 05:20 PM
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I suspect what you saw was the SK, the semiautomat, rather than an AK design which has been modified to being purely legal now.

There aren't many Yugo for sale in the US.


Actually, from what I understand, they are supposed to be from among the upper end as far as quality goes.

Most AK and SK in the USA come from China, and are generally considered inferior. The stock is pine, not as finished as it might be, etc. Also, fewer machined parts are finished. Upper receiver plate is rough on the inside from being cast, etc.

I bought a china-made SKS about 15 years ago, and have been entirely pleased with it. Today they sell for around $200. I've put it through h-e-ll, and it's been great. The pine stock is a little scarred underneath, from where I rested it on a piece of metal when I was taking extreme aim, but other than that, it's great.

Most of the Chinese came with a folding. stilleto-type (non-sharp) bayonet. People frequently use the bayonet for a monopod, to stabilize shooting. Other fitttings are worth more. Usually, there's a springloaded cleaning kit hidden in the butt-plate; sometimes there is a built on muzzle brake, etc.

The drawbacks to SKS/AK are:

-gas operated, so it has vents on the top of the barrel that shoot GOUTS OF FLAME when you fire it. Looks cool at night though. There is only one way to hold an SK/AK without burning your hand. period.

-most of the ammo exhausts a corrosive gas. In order to prevent decay to the barrel and lock/block/firing pin, you have to clean it thoroughly after each use. There is American-made, non-corrosive shells available, but they are much more expensive. Basically, communist infantry believed in daily rifle maintenance.

-some used guns may have been allowed to corrode. Have someone pull the bolt back, while you look down the EMPTY barrel. If you put the corner of a piece of paper in front of the bolt, it will reflect light into the barrel, and you should be looking down a mirror-smooth tube. Any black spots are probably pitting from corrosion. The more pitting, the less life the gun has, and the weaker the barrel (!)

-kicks like a lovesick mule

-the sound is distinctive, and usually brings Vietnam vets out of cover. You can only hear it for 5 or 10 miles, though.

-some cheap models don't have a safety. The safety is a lever that swings down on the side of the trigger.

-If it is cleaned properly, it basically spews an oily mist the first couple of times you fire.

-the lead in the bullets is VERY soft, and really accumilates in the barrel. It's hard to get it all out of the grooves. You have to really apply yourself.

-the 30 rd clips are often hard to find. Worse, they are not compatible with every gun. The SKS clip has a bullet-shaped prong in front of the opening. AK lacks this. The military rd is longer than the police version, because hollow points violate the Geneva Accords. Military rds won't fit in a Police clip, but the reverse will work.

-SKS/AK will not take a scope. There is just no way, without damaging it, to mount a vibration-proof scope. It's a carbine, and you'll have to be satisfied with that.


Good points of the AK/SKS family.

-cheaper than just about any other rifle

-ammo is cheap. I used to buy it in cans, 1000-rd drums litterally packed like sardines, with a little key to open it with.

-tough. You can clean it without fear of breaking it. It will fire even when soaking wet, or immediately after being dug out of a hole in the ground (don't ask!)

-most important of all: it has the flatest, truest trajectory of any carbine I've ever seen. You could drive nails with it. I shot an antelope at 300 yards, with the iron sight, and put the bullet in the animal's ear, when I was aiming for its neck. And I'm not a particularly good shot.

I love mine, and hunt with it frequently.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 05:41 PM
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Do you mean, ex-Yugoslavian version of AK? Well, I've handled many versions of AK (Chinese, Romanian, Hungarian, ex-Yugoslavia's (M-70B2, M-70AB2), Iranian, Russian, even east German) rifles while I served in army in Croatia. Of all these, Yugo AK was MUCH MUCH better in all aspects (even better then original russian AKM's). It's only setback is - barrel inside is not chrome protected, and that means - you gotta clean the barrel often, making sure it doesn't become rusty. However, since this rifle you saw is export version, it might have chrome-protected bore.

M-70, Yugoslavian version of AK-47

Anyway, if you want AK-47, Yugoslavian version is ABSOLUTE favorite. Trust me, I have lots of experience with these rifles. You won't regret, I bet my eye on it.


If you want some specific details, feel free to ask!



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 05:44 PM
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No, this was indeed a Yugo AK-47(Semi-auto), an AK "clone". I just wanted to know if Yugo's are reliable.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by Duby78
Do you mean, ex-Yugoslavian version of AK? Well, I've handled many versions of AK (Chinese, Romanian, Hungarian, ex-Yugoslavia's (M-70B2, M-70AB2), Iranian, Russian, even east German) rifles while I served in army in Croatia. Of all these, Yugo AK was MUCH MUCH better in all aspects (even better then original russian AKM's). It's only setback is - barrel inside is not chrome protected, and that means - you gotta clean the barrel often, making sure it doesn't become rusty. However, since this rifle you saw is export version, it might have chrome-protected bore.

M-70, Yugoslavian version of AK-47

Anyway, if you want AK-47, Yugoslavian version is ABSOLUTE favorite. Trust me, I have lots of experience with these rifles. You won't regret, I bet my eye on it.


If you want some specific details, feel free to ask!


Details would be cool. And please tell me about the Romainian AK also.


Thanks!



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 06:31 PM
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First, I'll tell you a good advice about Romanian version - stay away from them! Romanian version was first AK I was using in army, and it was really a poor weapon. Jams, mallufunctions, pistol grip falling off... It's barrel is too thin, wich means severe loss of accuracy after few hundred shots. And it's gunsights are too crude.

About Yugo version of AK, it's basically semi-automatic version of M-70. It's extremely reliable, very accurate for an AK, easy to dismantle and maintain, has exellent finish, nice gunsights, nice stock...

home.comcast.net...

www.zastava-arms.co.yu...


I wish you could use any non-Yugo version of AK-47 for two weeks, and then switch to Yugo version. Compared to this baby, even russian original (wich is second best option, but still not nearly as good), feels like a toy when held in hands! Difference between them would astonish you! And talking about falling apart... this rifle was constructed to fire rifle grenades, with special high-power ammo. So don't worry, it's not going to fall apart for a loooooooooong time! I've seen some of this rifles that are made more than 20 years ago, and have been used a lot during the war. They're still extremely reliable, but accuracy has dropped (wich is not strange, since they have fired thousands of rifle rounds and many some rifle grenades).

If you want some more details, please tell me what exactly would you like to know.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by Duby78
First, I'll tell you a good advice about Romanian version - stay away from them! Romanian version was first AK I was using in army, and it was really a poor weapon. Jams, mallufunctions, pistol grip falling off... It's barrel is too thin, wich means severe loss of accuracy after few hundred shots. And it's gunsights are too crude.

About Yugo version of AK, it's basically semi-automatic version of M-70. It's extremely reliable, very accurate for an AK, easy to dismantle and maintain, has exellent finish, nice gunsights, nice stock...

home.comcast.net...

www.zastava-arms.co.yu...


I wish you could use any non-Yugo version of AK-47 for two weeks, and then switch to Yugo version. Compared to this baby, even russian original (wich is second best option, but still not nearly as good), feels like a toy when held in hands! Difference between them would astonish you! And talking about falling apart... this rifle was constructed to fire rifle grenades, with special high-power ammo. So don't worry, it's not going to fall apart for a loooooooooong time! I've seen some of this rifles that are made more than 20 years ago, and have been used a lot during the war. They're still extremely reliable, but accuracy has dropped (wich is not strange, since they have fired thousands of rifle rounds and many some rifle grenades).

If you want some more details, please tell me what exactly would you like to know.



Are you 100% sure about the Romainian AK? Several other posters here said they where not the best, but they wouldnt fall apart and where reliable. So I have a ROMAK AK ordered.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 07:00 PM
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Export version is probably somewhat better then 'GI' version. But, the barrel is same, and steel is also same (and it's poor quality steel) like those used for standard army rifle. So, unfortuneatly, I'm certain it's not high quality weapon
, and far from Yugo Ak-47. I have some older Jane's magazine that compares all world's known versions of AK-47, and Yugo M-70B2 was ranked as best AK47 clone in the world

[edit on 18-8-2006 by Duby78]



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by Duby78
First, I'll tell you a good advice about Romanian version - stay away from them! Romanian version was first AK I was using in army, and it was really a poor weapon. Jams, mallufunctions, pistol grip falling off... It's barrel is too thin, wich means severe loss of accuracy after few hundred shots. And it's gunsights are too crude.




I think the jams are due to a canted gas tube. As long as you make sure the gas tude isnt on wrong, that shouldnt be a problem. As for the loss of accuracy, how bad are we talking? Could you hit something the size of a car at 75 yards? Cause I ordered one for $300.00.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 07:55 PM
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Jams were really various... first, when I fired a single round - the bullet case was not ejected. I tried to pull recharging handle in order to eject the case, but next bullet couldn't chamber properly. I had to dismantle rifle in order to remove jammed bullet, and found out why bullet case wasn't ejected - 'tooth' used to eject the 'brass' was worn out (poor metal). Next shot went fine, but I had a jam on the next one - due to weak return spring, next bullet again didn't chamber properly. Dismantling again. I had to 'borrow' a rifle from a soldier that has finished shooting, in order to complete my marksmanship evaluation. Some moments later, a fellow fired of all bullets loaded in a magazine in a single burst. I thought - sarge's gonna skin poor bastard. But he didn't, he mumbled something about damn Romanian guns, and told evryone who had Romanian rifles to wait for other shooters to finish, then to borrow rifles from them. Few days later, all Romanian rifles were replaced. I got Chinese rifle with funny looking bayonett - the rifle wasn't bad. In that period I had oportunity to try some other AK's. Later, when I was transfered to another unit, I also get a new weapon, Yugoslav M-70, and learned to respect it's ruggedness and reliability - I never had even slightest problem with this one.

But enough of stories; you asked something about accuracy. I saw this Romanian gun on a 100 meters range. 5 bullets, all within 100x100 cm target, but with terrible spread. But you're getting a new rifle, and I bet you'll be able to hit a car sized target at more then 200 meters, that's for sure. Well, at least with first 500 bullets.

You said, 300$ for the rifle? I think it's worth the money. My pellet gun costed me more then 200$.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by Duby78
Jams were really various... first, when I fired a single round - the bullet case was not ejected. I tried to pull recharging handle in order to eject the case, but next bullet couldn't chamber properly. I had to dismantle rifle in order to remove jammed bullet, and found out why bullet case wasn't ejected - 'tooth' used to eject the 'brass' was worn out (poor metal). Next shot went fine, but I had a jam on the next one - due to weak return spring, next bullet again didn't chamber properly. Dismantling again. I had to 'borrow' a rifle from a soldier that has finished shooting, in order to complete my marksmanship evaluation. Some moments later, a fellow fired of all bullets loaded in a magazine in a single burst. I thought - sarge's gonna skin poor bastard. But he didn't, he mumbled something about damn Romanian guns, and told evryone who had Romanian rifles to wait for other shooters to finish, then to borrow rifles from them. Few days later, all Romanian rifles were replaced. I got Chinese rifle with funny looking bayonett - the rifle wasn't bad. In that period I had oportunity to try some other AK's. Later, when I was transfered to another unit, I also get a new weapon, Yugoslav M-70, and learned to respect it's ruggedness and reliability - I never had even slightest problem with this one.

But enough of stories; you asked something about accuracy. I saw this Romanian gun on a 100 meters range. 5 bullets, all within 100x100 cm target, but with terrible spread. But you're getting a new rifle, and I bet you'll be able to hit a car sized target at more then 200 meters, that's for sure. Well, at least with first 500 bullets.

You said, 300$ for the rifle? I think it's worth the money. My pellet gun costed me more then 200$.



So you think I should take the rifle or tale the guy to cancel the order? Because if it jams like the one you had, I dont want it then.

If it's going to be a little inaccurat, that's fine. But I dont need something that jams every other shot.

So have the jamming problems been fixed?



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 08:17 PM
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In the begining evrything looks fine, but later you'll have severe malufunctions with Romanian AK. I'm 100% sure of that. And I'm also 100% sure that Yugo AK would serve you for lifetime!



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 08:18 PM
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Go here: www.surplusrifle.com...

These folks have a lot of hands on experience with a wide variety of Military Surplus rifles and pistols.

There are a lot of articles on shooting them, assembly/dis-assembly with good clear color photos.

Just scroll down the left side and select the firearm you're interested in.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by Desert Dawg
Go here: www.surplusrifle.com...

These folks have a lot of hands on experience with a wide variety of Military Surplus rifles and pistols.

There are a lot of articles on shooting them, assembly/dis-assembly with good clear color photos.

Just scroll down the left side and select the firearm you're interested in.



My computer freezes up every time Im go to a web site. The only ones that work for me are the ones in the favorites(This site being one of them). It would be nice if you could copy and paste some info on Romainian AK-47's.

I just hope mine doesent jam every other shot.



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 09:49 PM
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The positive impression of Yugo fits with what I've seen.

As far as ROMAK jamming was it a "stovepipe," where the spent case halfway ejects, and blocks the bolt from going all the way forward?

Or did the spent shells not even begin to eject properly?



posted on Aug, 18 2006 @ 09:54 PM
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Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

I suspect what you saw was the SK, the semiautomat, rather than an AK design which has been modified to being purely legal now.

There aren't many Yugo for sale in the US.


Actually, from what I understand, they are supposed to be from among the upper end as far as quality goes.

Most AK and SK in the USA come from China, and are generally considered inferior. The stock is pine, not as finished as it might be, etc. Also, fewer machined parts are finished. Upper receiver plate is rough on the inside from being cast, etc.

I bought a china-made SKS about 15 years ago, and have been entirely pleased with it. Today they sell for around $200. I've put it through h-e-ll, and it's been great. The pine stock is a little scarred underneath, from where I rested it on a piece of metal when I was taking extreme aim, but other than that, it's great.

Most of the Chinese came with a folding. stilleto-type (non-sharp) bayonet. People frequently use the bayonet for a monopod, to stabilize shooting. Other fitttings are worth more. Usually, there's a springloaded cleaning kit hidden in the butt-plate; sometimes there is a built on muzzle brake, etc.

The drawbacks to SKS/AK are:

-gas operated, so it has vents on the top of the barrel that shoot GOUTS OF FLAME when you fire it. Looks cool at night though. There is only one way to hold an SK/AK without burning your hand. period.

-most of the ammo exhausts a corrosive gas. In order to prevent decay to the barrel and lock/block/firing pin, you have to clean it thoroughly after each use. There is American-made, non-corrosive shells available, but they are much more expensive. Basically, communist infantry believed in daily rifle maintenance.

-some used guns may have been allowed to corrode. Have someone pull the bolt back, while you look down the EMPTY barrel. If you put the corner of a piece of paper in front of the bolt, it will reflect light into the barrel, and you should be looking down a mirror-smooth tube. Any black spots are probably pitting from corrosion. The more pitting, the less life the gun has, and the weaker the barrel (!)

-kicks like a lovesick mule

-the sound is distinctive, and usually brings Vietnam vets out of cover. You can only hear it for 5 or 10 miles, though.

-some cheap models don't have a safety. The safety is a lever that swings down on the side of the trigger.

-If it is cleaned properly, it basically spews an oily mist the first couple of times you fire.

-the lead in the bullets is VERY soft, and really accumilates in the barrel. It's hard to get it all out of the grooves. You have to really apply yourself.

-the 30 rd clips are often hard to find. Worse, they are not compatible with every gun. The SKS clip has a bullet-shaped prong in front of the opening. AK lacks this. The military rd is longer than the police version, because hollow points violate the Geneva Accords. Military rds won't fit in a Police clip, but the reverse will work.

-SKS/AK will not take a scope. There is just no way, without damaging it, to mount a vibration-proof scope. It's a carbine, and you'll have to be satisfied with that.


Good points of the AK/SKS family.

-cheaper than just about any other rifle

-ammo is cheap. I used to buy it in cans, 1000-rd drums litterally packed like sardines, with a little key to open it with.

-tough. You can clean it without fear of breaking it. It will fire even when soaking wet, or immediately after being dug out of a hole in the ground (don't ask!)

-most important of all: it has the flatest, truest trajectory of any carbine I've ever seen. You could drive nails with it. I shot an antelope at 300 yards, with the iron sight, and put the bullet in the animal's ear, when I was aiming for its neck. And I'm not a particularly good shot.

I love mine, and hunt with it frequently.










I, on the other hand, hope to get an either a AKS-74M, or an AK-101 sometime in the future. I hope there are semi automatic versions available, cuz I don't want to own illegal weapons (at least till they UNBAN assault weapons)



posted on Aug, 19 2006 @ 08:08 AM
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Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

The positive impression of Yugo fits with what I've seen.

As far as ROMAK jamming was it a "stovepipe," where the spent case halfway ejects, and blocks the bolt from going all the way forward?

Or did the spent shells not even begin to eject properly?



I've seen both of it. In most cases of jamming, extractor removed spent case from the barrel, but it would remain inside rifle housing ('tooth' that should eject spent case was worn out). Im order to unjam it, you had to remove magazine, cover and return spring, then remove empty case and also removed shell that was 'picked up' from magazine by loading mechanism in return swing, causing even bigger, and possibly dangerous jam.



posted on Aug, 19 2006 @ 08:17 AM
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Russian soldier, I like these 5,45 mm rifles very much. But then again, shooting ol' 7,62x39 brings me more satisfaction! I like its loud bang and hard recoil - you can 'feel the power'!



posted on Aug, 19 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by Duby78I've seen both of it. In most cases of jamming, extractor removed spent case from the barrel, but it would remain inside rifle housing ('tooth' that should eject spent case was worn out). Im order to unjam it, you had to remove magazine, cover and return spring, then remove empty case and also removed shell that was 'picked up' from magazine by loading mechanism in return swing, causing even bigger, and possibly dangerous jam.



How long ago was this? And what type/brand of 7.62x39 ammo where you using?


Also, thanks for all the info you have given me.



posted on Aug, 20 2006 @ 04:32 AM
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Around here the consensus is that Yugos are the best ak clones if you can't afford a SAKO M92

And a lot of my friends have served in balkans and handled a lot of those Yugos..



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