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Mixing water in your gasoline?!?

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posted on Nov, 10 2008 @ 09:56 PM
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reply to post by skitzo
 





Is this for real? are you crazy put water in your tank and your going to want to beat your self to death, it will probably run instead of having a V8 you will have a V1 AND IF IT EVER got below freezing you will be looking for a new car. just plane stupid IMO.




....You will have a better chance of getting better mileage using the drink V8.....Wow!...I could have had a V8...




posted on Nov, 11 2008 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by h3akalee
 




I had a water intercooler button on my Subaru WRX STI. It shot water into the turbo when i pressed the button increasing the power of the vehicle. In basic term's i beleive the water hit the turbo evaporated creating a pocket of much more dense air that was then forced thru the turbo.




I was not there. I should not doubt it was as reported. But I have gone to the Subaru website to find information on this feature. The factory installed water injection for the WRX Boxer Master 4 engine. It was not mentioned there. To see more on the WRX engines go to a Japanese website:
www.grahamberry2.co.jp...

CONCLUSION. The WRX engines offer both turbo charging and genuine supercharging via a positive displacement compressor most notable here in the Rootes type employed by Detroit Diesel for nearly a 100 years.

Some turbo chargers use oil cooling and others use water. This relates to the impeller which in a turbo may spin in the 70,000 rpm range. When the engine is shut down, some time may pass before the impeller stops turning. The torus - the spinner part of the impeller is in the exhaust system - and gets very hot. It turns the turbine (other part of the impeller) which is in the fresh air system. During the slow down time period the turbo’s bearings are put at risk for overheating. Therefore, some means of cooling the turbo’s bearings after engine shut-down is desirable. Usually water or oil is used. See Note 1.

This heat control technology is not required in the case of compressors - a supercharger as opposed to turbo charger - because those stop running when the engine stops. Eaton makes a lot of that type here for use by Ford and GM. Another PD supercharger was made for the truck engine by Detroit Diesel - GM - which began life as a 2 cycle engine. To make it go, it employed a Rootes type PD - positive displacement - supercharger. That featured 2 closely fit rotors or meshing blades and was powered by belt drive off the crankshaft.

Various sizes were made and are known by the engine size they were first meant for, 6-71, 8-71, or 6-91 and 8-91, which mean the number of cylinders and displacement per cylinder. Detroit Diesel also made a V type engine, as in 6V-71 or 6V-91. The “V” referring to the engine layout as opposed to the in-line engines without designation. Thus a 6-71 displaced 426 cubic inches (7 liters) and a 12V-91 had 1,092 cubic inches (18 liters).

As for water injection. The proud owner of the very handsome WRX Subaru who favored us with pictures, did not mention if he had to periodically re-fill the water tank for the turbo charger. If that was not required then regardless what the dash mounted push-button says, there was NO water injected into the airflow of his car.

Water injection has been around since Mr Otto invented the 4 cycle engine but it has never lived up to the claims made for it by its proponents. “Keep it simple, stupid” is one rule in mechanics that is hard to beat.

Note 1. Some cars operate on very high pressure water cooling system. Many will use an electric fan to cool the radiator after engine shutdown. This is meant to avoid the sudden release of superheated steam from the cooling system.



posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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water injection was used since the 1960's. even today water is used to cool air, when you think about it on a wet day there is water going in your engine. when water is turned to steam it expands 20000 times its original size witch removes carbon and increases compression. i'am not saying to dump a glass of water down your intake. but a mist when your motor is getting hot wouldn't hurt.



posted on Nov, 25 2008 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by Anonymous ATS
 




water injection was used since the 1960's. even today water is used to cool air, when you think about it on a wet day there is water going in your engine. when water is turned to steam it expands 20000 times its original size witch removes carbon and increases compression. I’m not saying to dump a glass of water down your intake. but a mist when your motor is getting hot wouldn't hurt.



Agreed. I worked on two engine B26s in Korea in ‘53-‘54. Those sleek craft were powered by the BEST air cooled engine of the era, the Pratt and Whitney R2800. More of those engines were made in WW2 than any other. It was offered in various configurations rated up to 2,450 horsepower.

That engine was used in both the Martin B26 and the Douglas B26 I worked on, as well as the Navy’s F6F, F7F, F4U, and the Army’s P47, P61 and in some of the later 4 engine transports. The Navy’s F6F Hellcat had the most kills in WW2. The F4U Corsair by Chance Vought (gull wings) claimed to be the fastest ever propeller driven warplane. 446 mph. 718 km/h. Armed with 6 .50 cal Browning MGs and 2,400 rounds of ammo. About 40 seconds worth.
en.wikipedia.org...-1A

All the P&W R2800s came with water injection off the assembly line. Whereas the engine’s scheduled major overhaul came after 1,000 hours flight time, anytime the water injector was used - labeled War Emergency Power - the plane was mandated for a major overall before being flown again. The engines had a 20 gallon water supply, good for about 5 minutes. The idea was to raise the internal pressure in the cylinders to give 10% boost in power to help a pilot escape a situation where only an extra burst of speed meant life and not death!

In the field where engines were more readily available than a fully equipped engine take-down shop, that meant most of the time the engine was pulled, a new one installed and the old one cannibalized for parts. America is so wonderful. Even then we were a throw-away society!

The B26 I worked on used the 2000 hp version but had the water injection removed. It was really about 1,800 hp at max rpm and at sea level. Working at Kimpo AB in Korea was the most fun I have ever had!


[edit on 11/25/2008 by donwhite]



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