It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

stardust and m-state elements

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 03:40 AM
link   
As the meteor showers comes in cyclic order,we can say that stardust comes in the same order as well.
Now lets say that there is stardust with large quantities of m-state materials and it comes to earth every xxxxx years.

Did NASA send their spacecraft ( www.nasa.gov... ) to see if we are getting close to such a event?!?

[edit on 11-8-2006 by one of many]




posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 07:32 AM
link   
I've never heard of M-materials, what does that mean exactly? I've heard of M-theory as being part of super string theory, but I thought that had to do with how the various dimensions posited by string theory work out.

I'm not sure the cyclic nature of meteor showers would have much to do with the earth's interception of stardust. The reason meteor shows are cyclic is due to the periodicity of the earth's oribit in moving through comet trajectories.



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:02 AM
link   
m-state elements or ORME or monoatomic elements.


en.wikipedia.org...
www.halexandria.org...



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:06 AM
link   
I believe s/he's referring to monoatomic elements, meaning they're not bound to each other. The Noble Gasses would be examples.

EDIT: Ah, you beat me to it.


[edit on 8/11/2006 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:16 AM
link   
Well, now that we cleared that bit of confusion up (because I wasn't sure if that's what you actually were referring to or not, myself) I feel fit to respond to your post.

Stardust (the probe) was sent out with the simple mission of flying through the coma of comet Wild-2. I suppose that calling the probe "Stardust" is a bit misleading, as what it's really collecting is comet dust. Despite that, comets are believed to have formed at the very beginnings of the Solar System, which means they more than likely contain all of the elements that the planets and Sun all congealed out of. So in essence, it is stardust that it's collecting, as well as planet dust.

Now, meteor showers do come from the Earth passing through the remnants of a comet, but primarily it's only small pebbles and chunks of ice that get left behind. The gasses in the tail are so light that they get blown away by the Solar Winds. Another thing is that meteor showers come annually, so it wouldn't be every "xxxxx years," it would be every year.

Also, let's say that a meteor shower did contain many monoatomic elements. So what? What would the negative impacts be? Hell, what would the positive impacts be? Nil, on either end... The amount of gasses left behind is so miniscule to what is already here on Earth, that it really would not have any effect.



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:27 AM
link   
Well i was referring to noble metals in monoatomic state and their effect on human body and mind.

Stardust (the probe) is capable of capturing those m-state metals.

P.S Who believes NASA anymore!?



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:38 AM
link   
Actually, it captured dust from the comet's coma... How could it have captured the gasses? Held out a mason jar as it passed through and then quickly screw on the lip?



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 08:53 AM
link   
There is a thing called air gel... do a little reading on my first link m8.
and once again i'm not talking about gasses as monoatomic elements!



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 09:03 AM
link   
Oh, for some reason I thought you were talking about the gasses. My misunderstanding. I'm very well familiar with how it captured solid material.


Though, comets really don't have a lot of noble metals in them. They're primarily ice, dry ice, hydrogen, helium, and amino acids. I'm sure that maybe they would have some content of the noble metals, but it's probably negligible compared to everything else.



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 03:33 AM
link   
there is no question that there is m-state elements in stardust.
Question is what if there are large quantites of those elements and could it "trigger" evolution some time ago?



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 06:37 AM
link   

Originally posted by one of many
there is no question that there is m-state elements in stardust.


I don't doubt that at all, just that the amount is going to be miniscule at most. Now, I could see there being a lot of monoatomic gasses, such as hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, and oxygen floating about from a comet en masse, but not so much with the metals.


Question is what if there are large quantites of those elements and could it "trigger" evolution some time ago?


If anything from comets triggered evolution some time ago, my money would be on the amino acids that have been found in comets. After all, they're the same ones that are in us, help us life, and are often referred to as the building blocks of life.



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 08:41 AM
link   
if you want.

stardust@home



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 11:22 AM
link   
Nice find but that isn't the question here and they are calling it stardust particle(wich can be anything).
There is no dateline on those pictures,so how can one know if the quantities are increasing?



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 07:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by one of many
There is no dateline on those pictures,so how can one know if the quantities are increasing?


Which pictures? What did I miss here?



posted on Aug, 13 2006 @ 09:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid

Originally posted by one of many
There is no dateline on those pictures,so how can one know if the quantities are increasing?


Which pictures? What did I miss here?


Pictures? They're electron microscope scans of the aerogel from the stardust mission. Berekely is running a program called stardust@home, where you can help locate the particles. If you find something good, you get listed as an author on the paper.

One of many put the horse before the cart. The PARTICLES have to be IDENTIFIED as such, before they can be ANALYSED to see whether they contain monoatomic elements. It's an oppurtunity to help, that's all.



posted on Aug, 14 2006 @ 09:33 AM
link   
Yeah, I know about the program... I just fail to see any pictures there, that's all.



posted on Aug, 14 2006 @ 12:10 PM
link   
sorry for my lack of words to describe microscope scans(you may call them images if you want to),actually their are called "Focus Movie".

Focus Movie description:
"A stack of images taken from a single field of view of the automated microscope at several different focus depths. Each image can be thought of as a frame in a movie; running the movie forward and backward by sliding your mouse up and down the focus bar in the Virtual Microscope is equivalent to looking through a real microscope and turning the focus knob."


quote
"One of many put the horse before the cart. The PARTICLES have to be IDENTIFIED as such, before they can be ANALYZED to see whether they contain monoatomic elements. It's an opportunity to help, that's all."


Well who gets to analyze them!?There is no real-time analyzing for those particles so they can say those are pieces of cheese if they want to!



posted on Aug, 14 2006 @ 01:08 PM
link   
Okay... But... My question is, where are they on the site?



posted on Aug, 14 2006 @ 01:24 PM
link   
go to Step 2 "Take Tutorial session" there are subpages on the top of page

hope this helps m8



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join