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What can we do to address race-relations and solve racism?

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posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
Invite a minority and their family from your neighborhood or work to stop over some evening for burgers and a beer. And when you're all together, don't talk racism, unless they bring it up. Just be friends. It's contagious.


I highly recommend this to all, thanks for bringing it up JSO. A few months ago this family moved into my neighborhood and they're a minority and there aren't that many minorities in my area. But anyway once summer came around they started having BBQ on their back yard almost every Sunday. And I live only a few houses down from them so one day I was out on my back pool and I was treated to this really pleasant smell coming form their yard. Now I've lived in that neighborhood almost my entire life and I pretty much know everyone but I didn't know these people (yet). So I thought what better time then now, I decided to call up two of my friends and asked them if they wanted to go over and have some BBQ with them. I managed to persuade them to do it and we got a couple of steaks and a few drinks and went over. I walked up to the guy on the grill introduced myself and said that I lived a few houses down and that I smelled his BBQ and I got a few stakes and some drinks. So I asked him if we could join them for BBQ and possibly get to know them in the process since they were new to the neighborhood and stuff. He looked at me for a short moment and said, these are the exact words BTW, "Hey that's fine with me, you're welcomed to join us as long as you let me cook these stakes my way." I said fine go ahead.

So to make a long story short, I ended up staying there for about four hours. I was able to introduce myself to all of them during that time and got to know them a bit better while just having a casual conversation and enjoying a few stakes. Now whenever they have BBQ its not an unusual sight to see me over there. Since then I've also become good friends with Sean, the son of the guy I told you about, he's about 17 which is slightly younger than me and now we hang out from time to time.

So like JSO said, if you have someone in your neighborhood who's a different race or ethnicity and you don't know them go over and introduce yourself and try to get to know them a bit better. Sometimes a simple gesture can go a long away.


And if you're wondering I live just outside of suburban Philly.

[edit on 3-9-2006 by WestPoint23]




posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
A few months ago this family moved into my neighborhood and they're a minority and there aren't that many minorities in my area. But anyway once summer came around they started having BBQ on their back yard almost every Sunday.


I loved your story. It reminded me of a time when my husband and I went across the street to welcome the new neighbors (who happened to be a different race) and they invited us for dinner. It was an ethnic meal and I will never forget it! Or the way I felt about the 'good will' that came out of that meeting.



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by ceci2006
And yes, while we're talking about "combatting racism before I was born", why not direct people to the entire post and the entire exchange.


It's on page 8 of this very thread. If people care about this thread, they have probably already read it. I have nothing to hide.


Originally posted by ceci2006
And yes, I did accept the apology about my parents.
...
I ask this before I go below the belt. I'm giving you a chance.


Apparently, you didn't accept the apology, if you're getting ready to go below the belt about it. That's ok. Go for it. I'm standing on pretty solid ground and I won't let you hurt me anymore.

By the way:


Originally posted by ceci2006
But I do have the foresight to see when you repeat something more than twenty times and the other race does not understand, sometimes you have you use another way to get them to.


I am not comfortable being categorized as "the other race". I am just another person.



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally quoted by Benevolent Heretic

A search for the term "delusional" in a post by me for the past year does not show any results for posts in discussion with you. Your accusation is not true.


Well...let's see what you did say to point toward that direction:


We ALL have the right to express ourselves equally and no one should feel guilty, no one is being burnt at the stake or put on trial. No one is trying to shut up the black folks. That's your fantasy. That's your perception. And might I add that's one of the biggest problems in your experience.




No one here has said nor indicated ANY of these things, you made them up entirely. Yet you put quotations around the words as if that makes it somehow more believable. You are a victim of these self-manufactured feelings and positions that YOU have placed on others. They are an illusion. But you believe them.


That is twice that someone has commented on my writing style. Oops. I better change it.

Other than that, you had mentioned "self-manufactured" feelings" and "illusions". This is even after I pointed out the quotes that I felt were problematic. But, if you think it is "manufactured" and "full of illusion", then other people will believe it is so. And that's where I think you are wrong.

I have a right to say what I want to say. I didn't stutter. And neither did you. And all the sweeping under the rug that you can do can't erase what you had said.

Maybe you're the one with the illusions--especially when you accuse others of "misconstruing your words".

And when someone says something about it, you write it off or laugh about it.

I never said that anyone was trying to shut up Black people. But that's your perception. It's also your words, however, that you said mine were a "fantasy".

But I decided to do something better than that. I decided to bring up other things that were problematic about your posts. Shall we see?



Do you know what the word means? And please don't apologize. I grow weary of your verbal assaults followed by 'genuine, sincere' apologies. No sweet, apologetic U2Us please.


I do know what apathetic means. And it is insulting for you to say that I didn't. Yes, I think that you are being apathetic. If I didn't, I wouldn't have said it. I think that to understand the plight of others, doesn't have anything to do with guilt. And I still believe it now. It has to do with feeling, consciousness and a conscience. But what some white people focus on is that "guilt" instead of what had happened in the past and the present. It doesn't have to do with the atittudes of people of color. And it doesn't have anything to do with getting you to say that you did the darn crime.

It is getting you to acknowledge what has happened and still happens and work on making race-relations better. What is so offensive about that?

By only taking the "I feel no guilt route", it is quite apathetic. No way around it.

But, then it is amazing that some whites don't feel guilty to "give advice to Black people" or "talk about the Black community". Where's your guilty feelings then? It is an act, is it not? You are conscious of doing this, are you not?

Secondly, you said you didn't want to work this out. So, you didn't see another u2u, did you? And I guess you're playing amnesiac when it comes to your own verbal assaults. But that's okay. Drama is part and parcel of Slug Fest. You are not immune.

That is, until you sent one to tell me your side in this affair. A few words. Nothing more.


But my point is - You, HH, have told me that many black people feel the same way that Ceci does. This is not hopeful for race relations. It puts fear and doubt into my mind. See, I thought we had come further than that. Now, knowing that many black people feel about white people the way Ceci does about me... That scares the crap out of me and does absolutely nothing for the advancement of race relations. To know that they might refer to white people as "Miss Scarlett" and think that's not a racist thing to do? Yeah, that's a scary thing indeed.


I hope it does scare the crap out of you. Because you can't claim to know everything about a race and then try to tell them what to think.

And about Miss Scarlett: what else could I have used to describe your meanness towards me? Would you please enlightening me on those other words?


But I'm hoping to go on and actually not believe you when you say that many blacks feel the same way that Ceci does. Because it hurts my heart to think that. I want to go back to where I was - before I got into race discussions with Ceci. I want to continue to think that she is somewhat of an anomoly. And if I'm wrong, I will still do what I know is right, which is to fight for equality and good relations between all people, regardless of color.


Well, what kind of Black people do you want us to be in this world? Meek? Not aggressive? Accomodating? Always agreeing with you? I'd say that's pretty arrogant on your part.

Black people have joined the "American Culture" before. And that still didn't stop the racism. It still occurs.

I am not an anomaly. And it is insulting for you to say this. I'm sorry that race is not something you can view in "rose colored" glasses. You truly can't. And you are not always right.

Good relations relies on honesty. And if you can't handle that honesty, you've got a problem.


Talking about racism in the style that is seen here (complaining, demanding, accusing, attacking) FEEDS racism and does a grave disservice to the cause of equality and healthy race-relations.


Speak for yourself. I'm not the one talking about "two different struggles" and "my cause".

You want to say that this is a lie too?


And I’m sure you can understand why I don’t care to ‘hang in there’ and keep trying.


That is being apathetic in my book. How else would you describe this? Love and understanding?

About accepting apologies, I did accept your apology. But if you think I didn't, that's your perrogative. It seems that your opinion is worth more around here than other people. Too bad you didn't start a thread on race relations to use it. I suggest you do, so you can talk about "real racism" and stop the illusion in its tracks.

But you didn't answer my inquiry. That does tell a lot too. Do you find anything offensive in what you said about my parents? Did you ever think why your words might be offensive (since you claim to understand Black folk quite a lot, now)? And do you ever wonder why the Black people you know never have gotten this deep about race with you?.

It would be helpful to understand why. Fighting for us is one thing. But as I mentioned to another poster, fighting with us is quite another.

I have nothing to hide either. And you know what, you are the other race. That's something that you can't escape. It's true we're human beings. We are also people. But we are also people of different colors. And I find it offensive that people of color always have to give up our beliefs and our culture to the other race in order to get along and be considered "human".

And before you say it, no I am not: 1)directing it at you; 2)trying to doubt your experience; and 3) saying an insult.

But I am expressing my opinion. Yet another time I've got to repeat myself.

Would you give up your heritage and culture to be Black? Really think about this now. Would anyone? Now this is yet another question I will ask where no one has the guts to answer.



[edit on 3-9-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 07:43 PM
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West Point,

It is a lovely story. BBQ's represent the beginning of making things better. But that day will come in the friendship when the person of color will say something that you find offensive: affirmative action, reparations, acts of racism.

Then, how will you be prepared to answer? That you don't believe them?

Or put another steak on the BBQ? Have another few beers in order to make each other drunk enough to forget the issues at hand?

How will you respond when the friend in question tells you about thier experiences of racism?

Would you tell the truth so the person of color knows where you exactly stand?

It takes a strong person to accept you for your views and still be your friend. It takes a stronger person to put up with them and stay despite the difference of opinion.

Are people strong enough to put up with that on both sides?

Sorry for being skeptical, but the questions have to be asked.


[edit on 3-9-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 10:14 PM
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WestPoint, that was a great story and, I'm sure, a great personal experience for you, especially since you're kinda young.


I also noted where you had to convince your friends to join you. Would you mind sharing why they needed to be convinced? Was it just normal teen-age apathy toward any activity not including girls? Or was it something else?

I'm just asking. It's obvious that you didn't need to be convinced.

Oh, and I also noted the seeming inital reticence of your host. Did you mean to imply that, or am I just making stuff up?



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by ceci2006
It is a lovely story. BBQ's represent the beginning of making things better. But that day will come in the friendship when the person of color will say something that you find offensive: affirmative action, reparations, acts of racism.

Then, how will you be prepared to answer? That you don't believe them?


No, not at all. Usually I'm just there to have a good time but I'm not at all apprehensive about this topic should it arise. I am more then prepared to be frank about my views and ideas, hopefully so will they. We can civilly discuss and debate certain things and we can still respect each other for who we are as people. So far they have been very respectful towards me and the only way they can offend me is by personally attacking me, not by brining up controversial topics.


Originally posted by ceci2006
How will you respond when the friend in question tells you about thier experiences of racism?


I will tell him that he shouldn't let ignorant people affect who he is, he's a way better individual and has tremendous character for not stooping to their level and for rising above it all. I will try to relate if I can with my own experiences of racism to show that racism can affect us all but that it can make us better because we seen first hand how horrible it is and we don't ever want to go there. Then I will take him out for the night and we'll both have... best if I don't go into details.



Originally posted by ceci2006
Would you tell the truth so the person of color knows where you exactly stand?


Absolutely, I have always told the truth as such I am not ashamed of where I stand on the issue so I have nothing hide.


Originally posted by ceci2006
It takes a strong person to accept you for your views and still be your friend. It takes a stronger person to put with them.


Of course, which is why I have the greatest respect for people who I normally disagree with on certain things. As long as they challenge my views and beliefs, without needing to challenge or personally attack my character; and as long as they still respect me for who I am as a person then they will have my friendship, loyalty and respect for they have truly earned it.


Originally posted by ceci2006
Sorry for being skeptical, but the questions have to be asked.


What are you skeptical of Ceci? And you don't have to be sorry but I am a little disappointed.

________________________

Just to add, before I went offline earlier I had a brief look at your post Ceci and you've edited it since then but earlier you had up there... I believe it was 'treat them or respond to them as you have to me and HarlemHottie'. Now I apologize if those weren't your exact words but I know you had something similar posted so I'd like to know just what exactly you meant by that Ceci?



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 10:23 PM
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Well, I thought about your earlier responses to us. Especially my response when it had to do with your dad and how hard he worked. And then Harlem Hottie's response asking whether you thought "racism is over".

You never did particularly answer our posts back there. But, I thought the better of it and erased it because I didn't want to fight about it any more after my "discussion" with BH.

Usually, when I write things at first, I think about what I said. Then, I read it and try to edit it to my satisfaction until the time runs out. And sometimes, I blow my top and say the first thing that comes to my mind. Then, I mellow and erase what I said and make it better. But I can see, no one will let me off the hook and allow me to change my mind. It's okay. Just be scared when I don't mellow and change my mind about what I wrote.

The "horse feces" comment was an example of what I felt was the truth and there was no way to soften it.

So, I was a little skeptical. And I've read your answers. I'm less so now because I think you meant well. It's just that I think that yes, there are gatherings that people can have and just be together without all the brou-ha-ha. But when the festivities end and the cultural differences arise, things happen.

I mean, it took little to nothing here before the cultural differences began to arise into something more. That's where my skepticism arose from until I read the comments of your last post.

You can stay silent about your views. You can even play at being objective for a while. But in the end there will be one story or political act in the news that will make you incensed. And if your friend sees it another way, drama will hit the fan. The question is whether you like the person enough to listen to them and understand what they are saying? Or, are you going to be angry with them and turn your back on someone who could potentially be a good friend for the sake of a principle?

I've had many peaceful and loving friendships with people who I care for to this day. But when there was something that struck us racially and culturally, those were tough times. But we got through them because we understood each other and how we thought about the subject.

Not many people can do that. Most people let the crap be scared out of them.


[edit on 3-9-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 10:38 PM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
WestPoint, that was a great story and, I'm sure, a great personal experience for you, especially since you're kinda young.


Yes it was, they're truly great people. And Rick (that's the name of the guy on the grill) makes great BBQ as well.



Originally posted by HarlemHottie
I also noted where you had to convince your friends to join you. Would you mind sharing why they needed to be convinced? Was it just normal teen-age apathy toward any activity not including girls? Or was it something else?


Well, when I called them and told them about it, now keep in mind they don't live as close to them as I do, they didn't see that much of a point to it and they thought it would be boring. I convinced them with the BBQ thing and told them they didn't have to stay long if they didn't want to. So they came and stayed for a little but they left before I did.

And HH to be honest with you whether they had reservations because they were black I cannot say, none mentioned that as a reason they did not want to come. However I've know these two guys since JR high I can vouch that they have not done anything that would lead me to believe they would treat blacks differently. And HH, who said there weren't girls there?



Originally posted by HarlemHottie
Oh, and I also noted the seeming inital reticence of your host. Did you mean to imply that, or am I just making stuff up?


Well no, I alluded to that because there was a slight moment of silence, I suppose he was just a bit taken aback that's all. I mean here's this teenage kid that you don't know approaching you like this, I would be a little surprised too.

[edit on 3-9-2006 by WestPoint23]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 11:25 PM
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I was re-reading the thread and something occurred to me. I guess I wasn't very clear in what I was trying to say in the first place.

Allow me to clarify. The "white trash" dialect to which BH referred is representative of an economic class of white Americans, a lower-class, and holds a negative connotation among the general population. As a group, white Americans speak a version of English known as "American English."

In much the same way, black Americans have a two-tiered structure of dialects, one of which is the umbrella, BEV. The black American version of the "white trash" dialect is, and I'm not really sure of its official, linguistic designations but, for the sake of discussion, we can call it, "ghetto," as in 'talking ghetto.' Here's a visual, albeit poorly rendered.

'White' Version/ 'Black' Version
American English/ BEV (general population)

"White Trash"/ "Ghetto" (lower class, segment of general population)

So, back to my original post, I didn't mean that I was 'talking ghetto.' I meant that I was using BEV, which has aspects of grammar unique from American English. While its not indecipherable to speakers of American English, it might sound weird. As an adult, I use it among my close friends, college grads of all colors, as a form of familiarity. With my lower-class black friends, I 'talk ghetto.'

The rude comment made toward me was not in reference to me 'talking ghetto,' but to BEV since, in a private school setting, there was no one to whom I could have been speaking. I'm fluent in American English, as my friend knew. I was insulted and felt that my friend was being racist because she incorrectly assumed that one excludes the other.



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 11:30 PM
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WestPoint,

I suspect they needed convincing for some mundane reason, I just wanted to make sure.


Originally posted by WestPoint23
And HH, who said there weren't girls there?

Good point. There we go with that 'solution' again...




Well no, I alluded to that because there was a slight moment of silence, I suppose he was just a bit taken aback that's all. I mean here's this teenage kid that you don't know approaching you like this, I would be a little surprised too.

I thought so, and agree with your reasoning. As an aside, though, remember when Chris Rock said, black people are scared of young white boys now, with Columbine and all that.


I also wanted to add that, in reference to the above conversation between you and Ceci, I too was a little skeptical of you at first, due to your comments in other threads. I agree with a lot of what you say on other topics, but on race... I didn't think you were racist, per se, but I did think that you were hard-nosed and, in my mind, mis-guided. I see now that I was wrong, and I'm happy about that. You're trying, just like everyone else here.


[edit on 3-9-2006 by HarlemHottie]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
Good point. There we go with that 'solution' again...


No not in this case, while there were girls there they were too young for my liking, they were about 15. So that comment which was accompanied by that suggestive smile might have been somewhat misleading.


Originally posted by HarlemHottie
I thought so, and agree with your reasoning. As an aside, though, remember when Chris Rock said, black people are scared of young white boys now, with Columbine and all that.


Ah, he doesn't have to fear me, my dad only owns one gun.
And according to him I don't have the combination to open the safe, so we'll just leave it at that.



Originally posted by HarlemHottie
I also wanted to add that, in reference to the above conversation between you and Ceci, I too was a little skeptical of you at first, due to your comments in other threads. I agree with a lot of what you say on other topics, but on race... I didn't think you were racist, per se, but I did think that you were hard-nosed and, in my mind, mis-guided. I see now that I was wrong, and I'm happy about that. You're trying, just like everyone else here.


Well, I'm sorry I came off that way, I didn't mean to but I can go over the top sometimes especially when such a topic like this becomes heated. And speaking only for my self I can say that you been very level headed and respectful toward me so I'd just like to thank you for that. And I would also like to take this opportunity to say something which I've been thinking about for sometime now. I don't know if you'll remember this but months ago in another thread you brought up a point that I didn't agree with. And, well, I sort of retaliated by trying to ridicule you with my reply because I saw that you were a new member and all. I forgot about that until I saw you post on this thread, I recognized your very distinct name so I'd like to apologize for that as well.


[edit on 4-9-2006 by WestPoint23]



posted on Sep, 3 2006 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
So that comment which was accompanied by that suggestive smile might have been somewhat misleading.

That's okay. I still feel buoyed by the fact that you said it. For some reason, I believe, in my heart, that beautiful black women could solve race relations.




Ah, he doesn't have to fear me, my dad only owns one gun.
And according to him I don't have the combination to open the safe, so we'll just leave it at that.



Well, good. (*sigh of relief*) With a username like like yours, we have to make sure, lol.

By the way, are you really there? I ask because I know quite a few grads.



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 02:19 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
For some reason, I believe, in my heart, that beautiful black women could solve race relations.

Oh..ok. U2U me and we can do some solving
and it's ok if u don't have a webcam, I trust u


[edit on 4-9-2006 by Elijio]

[edit on 4-9-2006 by Elijio]



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by Elijio
U2U me and we can do some solving and it's ok if u don't have a webcam, I trust u


Sorry, sweetie, I have a boyfriend, but I have done my share of 'problem-solving' in the past. TMI, maybe.




posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 05:22 AM
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I found the recent exchange between HH and WP23 to be interesting, for several reasons. HH asked why WP needed to convince his friends, and why the new neighbor seemed to be initially hesitant before he accepted WP’s self-invitation.

To me, it’s a pretty sure bet that teenage boys need to be jolted out of their mid-afternoon relaxations because that’s typical of boys. Their attitude is “Hey, I just opened a bag of Doritos and the Phillies are on.”

The neighbor would have looked at WP with several things on his mind: “Who is this kid? Is he for real?” and “Is he scoping out one of my daughters?” I say this from a father’s point of view.

But HH, there seemed to be a bit more mistrust in your questions. And mistrust is probably too strong a word - caution, maybe? Maybe I’m wrong. Even if there was a bit of mistrust, there might be a reason. That reason might be due to past experiences. Some that may have been a result of racism. Or maybe the guy had never been approached like that before.

Anyway, it makes me realize that situations are going to be viewed differently by different people, and a lot of that is due to past experience.



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 05:37 AM
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The word culture has been used here and in other threads quite often. Sometimes, not too nicely. For example, there was a thread about English as a national language. There were accusations that the concept of a national language was a scheme to rob someone of their culture, and to eliminate it.

It’s been used here also, in various posts. So I want to ask, what is culture? Without getting into a long sociological treatise, what it means to me is custom. Things like

Clothing. Wearing a burka, for example.
Ethnic foods
Attending religious services on a certain day
Celebrating holidays and birthdays, etc., in a certain way. I.e., Bar Mitzvahs
Language

Since it seems to find it’s way into so many discussions, I’d like to know what culture means to you. And, if it relates to racism in any way.



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 08:59 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
I was insulted and felt that my friend was being racist because she incorrectly assumed that one excludes the other.


Thanks for the explanation.
I'd have you agree with you. Your friend was being racist, especially if she'd heard you speak "American English" before. And even if you couldn't speak "American English" that wouldn't imply lesser intelligence. Only to some, I'm afraid.

It's just like a person from another country who doesn't speak English particularly well. They're not going to get a job as easily as someone who does. But the fact that they don't speak English well doesn't imply lesser intelligence.

I was watching a David Blaine special the other night and noticed (I notice a lot of things about race that I didn't before) that several black people responded to Blaines tricks with, "How you did that"? It never entered my mind that this person was unable or ignorant about English, I saw it as a preference. And I found it endearing. You may not like to hear that, but I said to my husband, "Isn't she adorable"!

To hear BEV spoken is a bit of a delight to me because I don't often hear it.

And I'd like to point out that my casual conversation with my friends is littered with explitives, so that there's a third level of speech in there that, while very proper English, wouldn NOT be used at a job interview.
And people have plenty of judgments about people who speak that way. I do "have to" give that up to be accepted in the grocery store or the dog club. And I put "have to" in quotes because it really is a choice I make.


Originally posted by jsobecky
Anyway, it makes me realize that situations are going to be viewed differently by different people, and a lot of that is due to past experience.


Boy! You said a mouthful right there, my friend! Everyone has their own context of any given situation. If we could all explain every minute detail about how we see a situation, we'd probably get along much better. But too many times, assumptions are made and we don't bother to check out the real meaning behind the words or how another person views a particular situation because of past experience, and that can really cause some problems.


Originally posted by jsobecky
I’d like to know what culture means to you. And, if it relates to racism in any way.


By what you've said here, I think it means the same thing to me as it does to you. (Clothing, food, holidays, language, etc.) Interestingly (or maybe not) I am totally detached from any 'culture'. Not in a negative way, I just don't have any desire to be invested in a culture or my culture. I don't celebrate any holidays, even birthdays most of the time. My clothing style is "comfortable". I love all kinds of food and don't relate to any as "my own". And I don't have a religion or go to church or even have religious beliefs. Some might say I don't care about culture. And that's true, FOR ME. I don't care about my culture. And I don't see that as a negative thing.

I'm lucky to know what date today is. Someone asked me last Thursday what I was doing for Labor Day Weekend. "When is it"? I asked...

I'm just very free of attachments. And that's the way I like it. I don't however, have any ideas or thoughts that everyone should hold the same importance (or in this case, non-importance) that I do for their culture. To each his own.

I know that culture is very important to some people. I live in the Southwest and see Mexican culture around me and I see and experience people of Mexican heritage and how very important their culture is to them and I say, "Bravo"! And I think it's beautiful, wonderful and especially tasty!

I have no negative judgments toward people whose culture is very important to them. It's just not a feeling I share. I had to write my brother to ask about slaves in our family's past because I know NOTHING about even my grandparents. (He didn't have any information about slaves, btw)

To me, culture has absolutely nothing to do with racism. I can't even really see how it could, but I'm eager to hear others' interpretation and input.


I'd like to be sure to stress at this time that having no interest in my own culture does not translate to apathy about everything else in life. I am very passionate about some things. I care deeply about many issues. It's just that my own culture isn't one of them.
I do find other people's culture interesting, fascinating and beautiful, but feel no need to be attached to one myself.

I'm just a person. An observer - Who loves life and people and dogs.



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 11:13 AM
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I'd like to add to jsobecky's question:

What is culture to you?
How important is your culture to you?
What aspects of your culture are more important than others?
What do you think and feel about other people's cultures?
Do you think the various cultures get in the way of relationships?
How have you worked to meld cultures or accept others' cultures?



posted on Sep, 4 2006 @ 12:02 PM
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There is one of your questions that I would like to address at this point:


Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
How have you worked to meld cultures or accept others' cultures?

I would never go out of my way to work to meld cultures. Each culture is unique, and deserves to live it's own life. Melding cultures tends to blur the lines of what makes us different, and ultimately the stronger one prevails, and we lose that piece of our history.

I accept each culture for what it is. Some I love, some I violently disagree with. I suppose that if I worked to change a culture that sexually mutilated the female children, it might be interpreted as "melding". I see it as more of righting an evil.

There was some talk early on about "racial blending". It was characterized as beautiful. I don't see the inherent beauty, or benefit to that, either. It should remain a personal choice.




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