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1904 British Enfield

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posted on Aug, 16 2006 @ 12:47 AM
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We don't even issue bayonets to our RK-62s (or 95s), since if you let the bad guys get that close you may just as well ram the barrel through the guys face...
On the other hand our army doesn't even issue knifes to troops, they assume that every man brings hi own... that way you get the TOOL you feel comfortable.

Btw, does the Enfield have any reliability issues? any parts that use to wear out etc?

Personally i prefer Mausers and Mosins over enfield, because they seem to fit me more erginomically, but the bolt is suberb, only the late model Tikka T3 bolts are faster (of the rifles i've tried)




posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 12:40 AM
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I just re read this thread after over a month and didnt realize so many had posted on it again since my last visit.

Its a real shame the conditions for owning and shooting a firearm in the UK. I am sure there are many like you who would like to spend some time keeping up thier shooting skills.
I went to my gun club today and shot my SKS Rifle and my 1903 Springfield bolt action in 30.06 rifle. I didnt shoot all that much but mostly sat around listening to the olde timers tell their stories. Sometimes this is as enjoyable as shooting. They often give me tips on reloading too. It helps alot.

Also agree with the pitiful excuse for bayonets. It is the same with the M 16/M15 type rifles and the excuse for a bayonet on them.

By the way...whats with all this stuff I keep hearing with the flack about the problems with SA80 type rifles in use today. IT makes me think about what happened with the M 16 rifles in the early Vietnam days. Ive been hearing alot of subdued talk about the failings of this bullpup rifle.
Any of you guys know much about it??

Thanks,
Orangetom.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 03:15 AM
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No my friend...............................fortunately for me, when I saw active service, we had a proper rifle, the FN SLR.

Having said that, many people I know, have seen active service in Bosnia, Croatia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq, not to mention in the jungle.

One of the problems that became apparent when the L85A1 was first issued, was that the barrels burnt out especially after prolonged firing [esp blank] on full automatic.

I put this down to the fact that Toms had a new toy to play with - automatic fire! We never had a rifle capable of full auto before and it was this novelty that created one of the many issues with this rifle.

Also in the early days, one had to tie the mag to the wpn with a piece of string, to prevent loss, before they introduced the protective cowl round the release catch.

The unit I work for, has just been issued with the L85A2 and it has a new cocking handle that is supposed to be of the ergonomic type [rubbish], but it still has a pathetic cheek piece of molded plastic and a plastic bolt release catch that is still prone to breaking.

The magazines have been revamped:

1. Special blank mags have bright yellow stripey plastic bands molded lengthways on them [I thought blank mags were blue and live were red];
2. You cannot charge blank mags with live rounds as the receivers are different;
3. It is difficult to discharge live rounds because you have to pull down on a sprung catch before the round[s] will fall out;
4. The mags are really difficult to strip down for abnormal cleaning.

Special blank firing adapters [BFAs] have been made to fit the weapons (L85A2 & LSW) at what extra cost? They have been designed to withstand 3 live rounds before they disintegrate. The differance? They are identicle apart from the word Rifle or LSW on them.

For the record, my friends have used the A1 & A2 in anger and on the whole, have found them to be reasonably reliable apart from the usual defects reported in the press - melting plastic parts, parts breaking off and prone to stoppages when full of dust/dirt etc.

I have used the A1 and found it to be an OK wpn but, as one who is old school, I still prefer the FN SLR.

At least when using the SLR with optic sights, if you hit something at 600 metres, he, she or it went down and stayed down.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 04:59 AM
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The SA-80 is a good target weapon, well atleast the LSW is , but as a weapon in the field it lacks. Even on cadet courses where only 2 in a section have fully automatic weapons they still jamm and need forward assists. It depends on the age and how looked after the rifle is, if its looked after it works like a dream. If not then its an expensive paper weight or just a big stick.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 08:22 AM
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I agree... up to a point.

I was a section gunner with the LMG and then the LSW. Of the two, I do like the LSW if only because of the SUSAT which does allow you to hit what you aim at at 800 metres provided if you use correct wind allowance.

Now.....................if only they made it in 7.62 milly


As to the L85A2, it is a much improved weapon but, as I stated in my post, it still has a few problems.

I had thought that given the problems with the L85A1, the government might have rethought the options available at the time.

There was rumours at the time that HMG was going to replace it with the M16A2 or the Steyr AUG but of course, as the adoption of the weapon was a political decision in the first place, they went for the A2.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 09:38 AM
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Well it wasnt a 5.56 weapon originally, it was a 4.6mm if my memory serves me correct..

True if it had been a 7.62mm weapon we wouldnt have trouble of stopping power lol, wouldnt like to be on the recieving end of a 7.62mm LSW



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 10:57 AM
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I have admired the FN/LAR or I believe it is sometimes called the FN/FAL series rifles...for years now. I almost bought one awhile back.

years ago they were quite expensive here in the states...I wanted to buy one some kind of bad but put it off several times because of other prioritys.
Now that I can afford one I am bought out on rifles and handguns. No question about the potencey of the calibration verses the 5.56mm cartridge so popular today.

These rifles seem to have come down somewhat in prices as I understand some stateside manufacturers are building them again. I also read that the FN type rifles are being used in Iraq by contractors who want more range/power than the AK type rifles.

THe term you use ..FN/SLR is a new term to me ..what does the SLR mean??

AS this is a post about the Lee Enfield rifles...someone posted the new versions re calibrated to the 7.62x51 caliber cartridge. This to me is the Enfield to own. This brings one up to date with todays cartridge selection. No question about the Enfield being capable of handling the power of the 7.62x51mm cartridge. Also no question about the Enfield rifle being rugged...as the Timex watch people say..takes a licking and keeps on ticking. The Enfield rifle has demonstrated this capability for many years in the service of the Empire.

THanks,
Orangetom



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 12:46 PM
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(hijack) Ok. You guys drew me in with your knowledgeable conversation. My hubby owns an Enfield. It's stamped "U.S.PROPERTY" and No 4 Mk I* (Any idea what the asterisk represents?)
It has a 10 round clip. I fired it once and thought I'd broken my collarbone. I love going to the range with him. When he fires it, we see heads peek out around the barriers. Everyone wants to know what the heck made that noise. During the time-outs to change targets, there's always a crowd around him and his rifle. My hubby has gotten to fire some pretty nifty weapons in exchange for letting others try the Enfield.
The brass buttplate has a little door on it. It used to hold cleaning gear in there. I'm still looking for an original cleaning kit.
(/hijack)

FullAuto 77, if and when you take your prize to a gun range; use hunting ammo rather than military ammo. Hunting ammo is cheaper and it has less kick. We used to be able to buy it at WalMart, but now we have to go to a hunting or military supply store.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 12:56 PM
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US Property? Well, that's a little out of the blue. Out of curiosity, where's it made? Where I'm living now is pretty close to one of the big Enfield ranges and fabrication sites during the Wars. Hell, I shot at a bunker near the site.

Long Branch, home of the Canadian Enfield.

I'm still damn jealous.

DE



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 01:48 PM
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THe term you use ..FN/SLR is a new term to me ..what does the SLR mean??

Nothing exotic I'm afraid Orangetom. SLR simply means Self Loading Rifle.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Well it wasnt a 5.56 weapon originally, it was a 4.6mm if my memory serves me correct..

True if it had been a 7.62mm weapon we wouldnt have trouble of stopping power lol, wouldnt like to be on the recieving end of a 7.62mm LSW


You're right of course.

Originally the weapon in question was called the Enfield EM-2 / Rifle, Automatic, caliber .280, Number 9 Mark 1.

I also think they [designers] were experimenting with 6mm as well, but as the government [Thatcher] decided to go with the L85A1, the rest as they say, is history.



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 03:12 PM
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I think $100 is a pretty good price, i'd like to collect one of those sometimes in the future



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 06:38 PM
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I asked my hubby about his Enfield. It's marked US property because this model was made for US marine snipers in WW2. It has a longer, heavier barrel. Breach to muzzle measures a little over 25 inches. And I had the ammo thing backwards. Military ammo is cheaper and has less kick, but - and this is a BIG but... Some military ammo has ingredients that cause corrosion in the barrel. The only way to remove those deposits is to pour boiling water through the barrel. Hunting ammo will have a higher kick and is generally much more expensive than military surplus, but worth it.

Pictures! Click on these thumbnails for full-sized pics.


Full-length View


Closeup of Bolt


Closeup of trigger markings


Closeup of Model mark and US Property imprint



posted on Sep, 18 2006 @ 08:07 PM
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My jealousy knows no bounds. That is one gorgeous rifle.

DE



posted on Sep, 19 2006 @ 01:34 AM
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Originally posted by fritz
THe term you use ..FN/SLR is a new term to me ..what does the SLR mean??

Nothing exotic I'm afraid Orangetom. SLR simply means Self Loading Rifle.



LOL LOL LOL....I knew that!! ...Fritz...of course..I knew that.!!


Thanks for the info Fritz. I still admire the FN Rifle. I think it is a fine design. Classic ..like the Enfield...

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Sep, 19 2006 @ 01:45 AM
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Wow..thanks for some great pictures.

YOu got me to thinking ..about something I saw years ago in a gun store long since gone out of buisness.

The owner had on the wall a M1 Garand with the bayonet. I asked him why it was not for sale as indicated by the sign underneath it.
He told me it was one of the very rare M1 rifles. It was in the caliber of .303 British and made for trials by the British military. Only a limited number of them were ever made. THe Brits did not take to them and prefered thier SMLE Rifles ..or sometimes called the "Smelly" only a limited number of these .303 caliber M1 Rifles survive in private collections. Ive never seen another one since.

Great pictures you have shared with us..and I thank you for this.

By the way..what is the process you used for posting pictures? I have just now figured out how to use the " quote" button in the upper right side of the page. Took me long enough. So if you or someone else can explain it to me in about six months I might also be able to post some pictures.

Thanks,
Orangetom




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