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air in space i just seen a bbc newsround report

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posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 11:50 AM
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I know that what back to reality is saying isn't true ... but does he? quite convincing lol.




posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 11:51 AM
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It's the aliens who have spread the "lie" of no air in space to breathe. It's really a case of the alien "man" keeping us down on the earth. Imagine how many planets we would have colonized by now if not for the alien big lie.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 11:57 AM
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if there is more air the higher the altitude then why can a helicopter only fly to AT MOST 40,820 ft (this being the world record set by Jean Boulet in 1972, in a HEAVILY modified copter)? Trust me, if you've ever smoked a doobie driving over Loveland Pass @ 12,000ft in colorado, you'll know the air gets thinner.

:gasp gasp:



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
Without an O2 supply, you will soon begin to feel the effects of Hypoxia. Why do you think mountain climbers take bottles of O2 with them? If the air was fine up there, would they even need them?


Interesting question. Why don't you ask football players, track stars, basketball players, soccer players, marathon runners, etc, etc, etc.



So... You're claiming that air is moving through the cabin of commercial airliners at 600+ mph?


No. Nowhere did I mention the speed at which the air moves through the cabin. I only mentioned the speed at which the airliner is traveling. Of course, there is a series of ducts and filters (as the article mentions), much the same way that the ram air automotive applications have air filters and air intake hoses. This is also true of your home air conditioning system. Once again, I will defer to science. Volume makes all the difference. Lots of duct work will reduce the volume of the incoming air, thus slowing its entry speed into the cabin.



[EDIT: quoting]

[edit on 9-8-2006 by backtoreality]



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
Interesting question. Why don't you ask football players, track stars, basketball players, soccer players, marathon runners, etc, etc, etc.


Well, he who is so wise in the ways of wisdom, why don't you just answer it? I fail to see what that has to do with anything, as those who climb mountains do it at a slow pace, versus those who are constantly in motion.



Once again, I will defer to science.





Volume makes all the difference. Lots of duct work will reduce the volume of the incoming air, thus slowing its entry speed into the cabin.


So, you know, taking a moving substance then pushing it through a smaller space will in fact increase the speed of the substance? Or is that something that was made up by science as well?

Here's a thread by a like "scientific" mind you may enjoy: Can Someone Explain Why There is not Glass in the Atmosphere?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:14 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
So, you know, taking a moving substance then pushing it through a smaller space will in fact increase the speed of the substance? Or is that something that was made up by science as well?


Once again, you are making assumptions about my statements. However, your statement above in indeed correct--assuming that the airflow in being pushed through a smaller space. If the airflow inlet on a plane is the size of a golf ball, and that airflow then goes into some 500+ overhead air ducts (using your 747 analogy), not to mention the larger ducts for overall airflow, then by your own statements this would result in the comfortable pressures we see on board aircraft.

Don't you think you are getting a little too concerned about the details?

As far as the mountain climber and the oxygen, climbing anything for a length of time requires a tremendous amount of energy. If not, all those people at the gym on stairmasters are just wasting their time. Correct?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
If the airflow inlet on a plane is the size of a golf ball, and that airflow then goes into some 500+ overhead air ducts (using your 747 analogy), not to mention the larger ducts for overall airflow, then by your own statements this would result in the comfortable pressures we see on board aircraft.


Firstly, what 747 analogy did I create? Secondly, where on the plane is this golf ball sized hole in the plane? I would like to a diagram of the plane, preferably one including this duct work you speak of.



As far as the mountain climber and the oxygen, climbing anything for a length of time requires a tremendous amount of energy.


That's why they stop and take breaks, to regain thier strength and energy. A marathon runner doesn't exactly get to stop along the way.

Besides, if the air is better, like you claim, at altitude, wouldn't that mean it's better for them to breath and therefore more gets to thier muscles, making them more resistant to the strain of the immense physical action? I mean, that's using your logic, after all... Or like most "science" is this a pick and choose sort of thing where you get to say what does and does not apply?

[edit on 8/9/2006 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:31 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
Firstly, what 747 analogy did I create? Secondly, where on the plane is this golf ball sized hole in the plane? I would like to a diagram of the plane, preferably one including this duct work you speak of.

My appologies, it was Zaphod58 who posted an excerpt detailing the duct work on a 747. Please go back to Page 1 and read all postings.



That's why they stop and take breaks, to regain thier strength and energy. A marathon runner doesn't exactly get to stop along the way.

????
I'm failing to make the connection here.




Besides, if the air is better, like you claim, at altitude, wouldn't that mean it's better for them to breath and therefore more gets to thier muscles, making them more resistant to the strain of the immense physical action? I mean, that's using your logic, after all... Or like most "science" is this a pick and choose sort of thing where you get to say what does and does not apply?

[edit on 8/9/2006 by cmdrkeenkid]

Oh, an edit, there we go.

Again, I didn't claim the air was "better", I stated it was denser. "Better" is a very general term not used in the realm of science you seem to adamantly support.
I digress...
Again I fail to see the logic in the argument. Athletes on the ground use oxygen, despite it being more available to our respiratory systems as you claim. So what is the difference if I claim mountain climbers do the same thing at high altitudes, where I claim air is more available to our respiratory systems?


The title of this thread deals with air in space, shall we return to the world of space where air is plentiful?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
...shall we return to the world of space where air is plentiful?





posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:46 PM
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Just goes to show you that the official "ATS SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT" has no clout whatsoever.

So, finally, can we get back on topic please?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:49 PM
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What? We were getting back on topic with a warm welcome from Mr. Roarke and Tattoo. After all, they hold the key to the only place this topic can exist...



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:53 PM
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How clever.

*sigh*

Someone? Anyone??



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
They collect natural gas from the astronauts and then convert it into a usable fuel.

You never seen any stars in space because you need special glasses.

The earth in fact is not 360 degrees. It is exactly 248 degrees.

Finally, you are right, there is air in space.




That's hilarious! You need help cleaning your telescope back to reality?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:57 PM
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Well, if the air is denser higher up, why does it not settle to lower altitudes? Logic would suggest that it would, but since when has that played part in this thread?

Feel free to answer either question, though preferably both.

Also, where is this golf ball sized hole to allow air in on a 747? You neglected to answer that previously.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 01:59 PM
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The higher the altitude, the thinner the air. The thinner the air, the harder it is to breathe.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by Akraites
The higher the altitude, the thinner the air. The thinner the air, the harder it is to breathe.


Then how do you explain basketball players being able to jump higher than midgets?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
Well, if the air is denser higher up, why does it not settle to lower altitudes? Logic would suggest that it would, but since when has that played part in this thread?

If logic didn't include our knowledge of gravity then, yes, you would be correct. I myself am waiting for logic to appear in some of these posts.



Feel free to answer either question, though preferably both.

Done. Next.



Also, where is this golf ball sized hole to allow air in on a 747? You neglected to answer that previously.

What kind of question is this? Of course I don't know where the inlet is. If I did, someone would be at my door to kill me. I didn't claim to know where it was or even it's actual dimensions, I simply used that as an example.

Now, if you would like my hypothesis, I would say that it is built into the existing pumps on airplanes. That way when there is a problem with the inlet, they can just replace the "pump". Nice and neat. No one's the wiser.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by junglejake


That's hilarious! You need help cleaning your telescope back to reality?

Thanks. Nah, I'm good.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:10 PM
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Umm… Is someone going to address Endiku’s video? Why was that orange tarp thing moving like that?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by Akraites
The higher the altitude, the thinner the air. The thinner the air, the harder it is to breathe.

Ladies and gentlemen, Dr. Akraites at your service.



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