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air in space i just seen a bbc newsround report

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posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 01:02 AM
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I forgot to add the air that's inside the ISS, Space Shuttle, etc. so yeah there's air in space alright. That's my smart @$$ way of understanding it anyhow




posted on Feb, 5 2007 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by ShAuNmAn-X
I forgot to add the air that's inside the ISS, Space Shuttle, etc. so yeah there's air in space alright. That's my smart @$$ way of understanding it anyhow


LOL I dont think anyone here could argue with that.



posted on Feb, 5 2007 @ 02:42 AM
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Originally posted by Tom Bedlam
Dear back:

If you ever take this show into the paranormal threads, PLEASE let me know so I can watch. You are killing me.

Yes please. Me too.

You are my hero.


You have voted backtoreality for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have two more votes this month.



posted on Feb, 6 2007 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by c00ws
Above 25K you do not need oxygen. it merely lowers the elevation by about 1k however above 25k you will die if you stay there to long and moutnain climbers suffer vast effects to there bodys when they stay there to long

Oh and if there is air in space than how come gas from stars hasn't choked me to death yet

PS I am talking about feet here


Mr. COWS:

Thank you for your thoughtful reply. I have reviewed your statements in detail and am quite frankly rather confused. At your earliest convenience, please resubmit the above including the extremely useful gramatical interogative notiation. I look forward to your reply.

Best regards,

backtoreality



posted on Feb, 8 2007 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by ShAuNmAn-X
I know that there is oxygen in space but, it's not breathable per say. Breathable air in space (interplanetary or interstellar)? I'm sorry but I definately have to wave the BS flag on this one. (unless you have some shocking proof that is)


Funny, I happen to be waving a much larger 'BS Flag' from my side. Please explain how the air in space--that you readily admit exists--is not breathable "per se". Until then I am afraid I will have to fly my flag proudly; unless you have some shocking proof that is.


Edit: I realize the above post did not progress the debate much but merely encouraged conflict. Though the evidence is overwhelming and tedious, allow me to offer a common-sensical explanation: take 20 minutes and read this thread from the beginning. The evidence is all there, much of it presented and ignored, and compiled as a whole I think you will find is quite compelling.

[edit on 8-2-2007 by backtoreality]



posted on Feb, 8 2007 @ 09:58 PM
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The real Truth is...


"The primary source of oxygen will be water electrolysis, followed by O2 in a pressurized storage tank," said Jay Perry, an aerospace engineer at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center working on the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) project. ECLSS engineers at Marshall, at the Johnson Space Center and elsewhere are developing, improving and testing primary life support systems for the ISS.

Most of the station's oxygen will come from a process called "electrolysis," which uses electricity from the ISS solar panels to split water into hydrogen gas and oxygen gas.

Left: The ISS's first crew -- Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko -- aboard the Space Station. During their four-month stay, the crew will rely on the Station's hardware to provide breathable air.

Each molecule of water contains two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. Running a current through water causes these atoms to separate and recombine as gaseous hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2).

The oxygen that people breathe on Earth also comes from the splitting of water, but it's not a mechanical process. Plants, algae, cyanobacteria and phytoplankton all split water molecules as part of photosynthesis -- the process that converts sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into sugars for food. The hydrogen is used for making sugars, and the oxygen is released into the atmosphere.


[edit on 8-2-2007 by AnAbsoluteCreation]



posted on Feb, 8 2007 @ 10:03 PM
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*sigh*

Again, please re-read this thread from the beginning and all will be clear.
Doing the below is no secret and really is not necessary to post.


1. google
2. "air in space"
3. copy and paste



posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 11:36 PM
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Have you guys ever seen what happens to a balloon in a vacuum?

Now swap the balloon for eyes and body parts.

You could try breathing in space, but your body cells would expand and burst before you knew it.

Exploding eyeballs would be cool but it would not be a nice way to die. Can you imagine the pain involved with a reverse kick in the nuts.

I hate movies where people end up in space without a suit, then come back onto the ship or whatever and are just bleeding and stuff.

I mean, decompression/compression is enough of an issue in the ocean. Exposure to a vacuum would likely ensure death, even if it were only for a second.

POP!

PS: The issue isn't how 'thin' the air is, rather the environmental pressures involved.

Sure theres air in space, all sorts of molecules exist in space, it just depends on your definition of air. To be honest I didn't bother to read this post properly but I'm sure the original article has more to do with filtering loose molecules in space rather than going outside and taking deep breaths.

[edit on 14-2-2007 by seenitall]



posted on Feb, 26 2007 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by seenitall
To be honest I didn't bother to read this post properly but I'm sure the original article has more to do with filtering loose molecules in space rather than going outside and taking deep breaths.
[edit on 14-2-2007 by seenitall]


Honesty is the best policy, but your "sure" assumptions are surely incorrect. The debate is open to one and all, boys and girls, but please understand where we have been and where we are heading in this discussion so as not to lead us in a undesirable direction.

We have established that "going outside and taking deep breaths" is not in NASA/space industry's best interest, though we have talked about the engineering side and "cross-ventilation" in cabin cooling.

This is a very interesting topic and I for one am glad to see the passion oozing forth in every keystroke from those who have posted thus far.

Excellent work, ladies



posted on Feb, 26 2007 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
We have established that "going outside and taking deep breaths" is not in NASA/space industry's best interest, though we have talked about the engineering side and "cross-ventilation" in cabin cooling.

Maybe now would be a good time to post the formula to calculate the Luminosity of the stars that takes into account "the breathable air in space and the effect it has on light from distant stars"?

Please?

Thank you.



posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 02:12 AM
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Originally posted by backtoreality
We have established that "going outside and taking deep breaths" is not in NASA/space industry's best interest...

Or the astronauts'. Space is full of hard radiation that would fry our intrepid spacewalkers to a crisp if they didn't have their helmets on.

Of course there's air in space. What do these people think aliens breathe?

[edit on 27-2-2007 by Astyanax]



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