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Chopper UAV

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posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 04:03 PM
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I was just searching for images and this stuck out as one I don't THINK i've seen before

It looks as if the rotors can be used horizontally for chopper like flight and then possibly rotated to vertical for plane like flight!

I can't find any more info on it just hoping ATS'ers can shed some light on the subject

If this has been covered before sorry mod's!





[edit on 8/3/2006 by evo1981]




posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 05:56 PM
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Would help if we knew the source.

I don't recognise the specific vehicle but the duel ducted fan concept was very much the basis of Kestrel Aerospace’s designs. Search for Kestrel Aerospace Lancer and you'll see what I mean. They've gone out of business now but a new company has emerged from the same people called Dragonfly Air Systems, this might be a concept from them but it's just speculation on my part.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by evo1981
I was just searching for images and this stuck out as one I don't THINK i've seen before

It looks as if the rotors can be used horizontally for chopper like flight and then possibly rotated to vertical for plane like flight!

I can't find any more info on it just hoping ATS'ers can shed some light on the subject

If this has been covered before sorry mod's!





[edit on 8/3/2006 by evo1981]



Bell did a system like this, albeit without the enclosed fans, for their original 'Pointer' UAV which looked a lot like a miniature tiltrotor. The problem is of course getting enough blade speed to push enough mass flow through the small duct to gain effective lift without creating huge erosion and noise/vibration levels.

Often, for propulsive efficiencies, it's better to go with a given sized core engine to spin a quite large fan in a fixed duct and then use vectoring paddles or RCS type shunts to enable the transition to forward flight on core thrust alone.

The one big problem then being that you tend to eat a lot of fuselage volume with 'fore and aft' fan compartmentalization problems, leaving only the centerbay for fuel and engine.

I read somewhere that the Israelis use a tilt-duct system to emplace small sensors on rooftops in places where they otherwise cannot go. I think it involves the power system being ahead of the main payload bay in a vertical stack and the entire unit articulating to provide forward motion. Whether they can actually achieve horizontal (fuselage to airstream) flight I don't know.


KPl.



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