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ejections system on choppers

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posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 02:50 PM
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just curious how do piolets eject from choppers if they can.
and what varieties are there of this sort of system

[edit on 2-8-2006 by bodrul]




posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 02:53 PM
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They don't.


The only ejection seat in a helicopter that *I* know of was the Ka-50 Hokum. The Soviets had a system that ejected the rotorblades a split second before the seats. I don't know if it ever went into production or made it beyond the testing stages though.

[edit on 8/2/2006 by Zaphod58]



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 02:55 PM
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The ejection system is to try to crash land, or jump a second before.

Or pray to god, hope your soul is ejected when your body burns up



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 03:10 PM
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is this possible (from goldeneye) if the helicopter exists


www.rotaryaction.com...

basicaly the rotters get blown off and the cockpit of the helicopter geticens from the rest of the helicopter


Mod Edit: Image Size – Please Review This Link.

Mod Edit: Image Hotlinking – Please Review This Link.


[edit on 2/8/2006 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 03:17 PM
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No. Pod ejection systems are heavy. They had to get rid of the pod in the B-1 because it added too much weight to the plane.



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by bodrul
is this possible (from goldeneye) if the helicopter exists



Is the heli in Goldeneye was the Tiger if I recall... The ejector system was fantasy.

Regards



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 04:05 PM
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there was also a plan to try to eject out the sides then up when passed the roter. i don't think they ever went through with it though. i believe it was mcdollal douglass that was working on it back in the 80's i think it was.



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 04:27 PM
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Kamov KA-50s are equiped with a system that explosivley cuts the rotors to clear the space above the pilot, which allows you to eject like a fighter pilot would. However this is the only ejection system produced for a helicopter (or at least, that I'm aware of).

Helo's are inherently safer than aircraft however, because the rotors can be allowed to freewheel in the wind, acting like a parachute and allowing you to return to the ground in a (somewhat) safe maner. Local news actually caught footage of one of their choppers loosing power and falling onto a building. It didn't look like fun, but no one was hurt.

That's not to say a helicopter crash can't be fatal... especially if you crash 'cause someone's shooting at you.



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 10:48 PM
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A sideways ejection isn't feasable because the body can't take nearly as many lateral G forces as it can normal Gs. And an ejection puts a LOT of Gs onto a body. Most fighter pilots that eject end up an inch or two or even more shorter after the ejection.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 02:10 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
...Most fighter pilots that eject end up an inch or two or even more shorter after the ejection.


Yes, IMMEDIATELY after ejection. Usually this however normalizes when the body has time to recover.

Anyway, the KA-50 is the first with ejection seats (why are you all speaking of "was"? the Russian Army recently purchased a few). Personally, I expect to see this more often in the future.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 02:12 AM
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Actually, no. Quite a few of them REMAIN an inch or so shorter after ejecting. Or worse depending on the circumstances of the ejection. I've met several pilots that ejected that lost between 1/2 and 1 inch permanently.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 02:14 AM
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They don't.


LOL sums it up.

Maybe drop out the bottom or something ?

But heli pilots are in it for the way down !!!



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 03:16 PM
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it can't be donne in any sypmle manner if they tried side ejection then there a posibility of them hitting the heli when its on a spin, the 2x ejection system of ejecting the rotors and then the pilots was not viable. pod ejection is the same. the best way is to ride it out as long as the propeler is spining death is not a final outcome, besides during fights helicopters dont really go up that high the most is probably the same as the tallest building and in the places where they fight its usually on 5 stories



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by RedMatt
Helo's are inherently safer than aircraft however, because the rotors can be allowed to freewheel in the wind, acting like a parachute and allowing you to return to the ground in a (somewhat) safe maner. Local news actually caught footage of one of their choppers loosing power and falling onto a building. It didn't look like fun, but no one was hurt.

That's not to say a helicopter crash can't be fatal... especially if you crash 'cause someone's shooting at you.


Speaking as someone who has walked away from a helicopter crash (twice) I have to agree with RedMatt. The nice thing about a helicopter is that they can land in a relativly small area when compaired with a fixed wing aircraft. The freewheeling that RedMatt speaks of is called an autorotation. It works by reversing the pitch of the rotor blades which allows them be spun by the airflow of the falling helicopter. Then at a certain distance above the ground, the pilot changes the blade pitch and the momentum in the spinning rotor allows enough lift to be generated to make the landing hard but survivable. The seats in most helicopters are designed to collapse downward cushioning the passengers.



posted on Aug, 5 2006 @ 03:01 AM
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I wonder if it would be feasible to spin the seat 90 degrees and then eject sideways?

I was also thinking about ejecting downward, but that might be a death sentence especially in low level heli flight



posted on Aug, 5 2006 @ 03:15 AM
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ejection seat in a chopper = upside down blender

Anyone want a margarita ?



posted on Aug, 5 2006 @ 04:37 AM
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The simplest approach would be a module or pod ejection system. With advances in structural materials and composite work - it *might* be capable of being employed - but quite possibly with severe limitations.

I would say a reinforced cockpit designed to act like a car does (crunch on impact - can't think of what to call that, really) that simply drops out of the bottom would do the trick. An instrument prevents it from releasing at an angle where the 'pod' is in danger of flipping back up on the airframe, and will wait until the first safe moment to blow some explosive bolts which will disable parts of the structure, allowing it to become 'crunchable' (over hardened to sustain combat damage and not compromise the ejection system).

But even that is pushing some things. Not only in practicality - but in the dangers it might present. Such as the helicopter coming down on top of you after successfully smashing into the ground and rolling down the mountain side for a kilometer only to land in the local creek.

So, we could combine this with another concept - a system that disables said cockpit structuring to allow for a more gradual deceleration on impact, yet still remain attatched to the helicopter, which would allow for a degree of control. It would make returning the aircraft to flyable conditions next to impossible in the field (and impracticle even when at a base....), which is one drawback - unless that is conquerable through further engineering.

I'm not even sure if helicopters already use that type of a system or something similar. I could be trying to reinvent hydraulics, so......



posted on Aug, 5 2006 @ 06:44 AM
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I was always under the impression that most military helicopters had either the Hokum-style explosive rotor system, or the seat was ejected downwards.

Obviously, I was under the wrong impression!
Just another day of denying ignorance . . .



posted on Aug, 7 2006 @ 05:42 PM
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The Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne(My Favourite AH) uses downward firing seats from an F-104 Starfighter.



posted on Aug, 7 2006 @ 07:15 PM
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Qwick flick on the Russian KA-50 Black Shark . Dated but is one of the true ejection
capable helo's out there ,also V-22 has Aces II seats .

Flick :
www.youtube.com...


ACES II
The ACES II (Advanced Concept Ejection Seat) is considered a smart seat since it senses the conditions of the ejection and selects the proper deployment of the drogue and main parachutes to minimize the forces on the occupant. The seat is a derivative of the Douglas Escapac seat.
Removal from the aircraft is by a three part pyrotechnic sequence. A gun catapult provides the initial removal of the seat from the aircraft. A rocket sustainer provides zero/zero capability to the seat. To prevent the seat from tumbling when the aircraft is in a roll maneuver or there is a center of gravity imbalance, another (smaller) rocket called a STAPAC is attached to a gyroscope. This senses the motion and attempts to keep the seat from spinning by automaticly providing a correcting force.
Once clear of the aircraft, the pitot - static system on the seat measures the conditions and selects one of three operating modes depending on the conditions present at egress.

Mode 1 - Low speed (



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