Jury Duty

page: 2
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join

posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 02:22 AM
link   
I was selected to jury duty, right when I turned 18 (a few months after). That freaked me out, since even the older people (parents, etc.) had never served, and here I am, all ripe. I didn't get picked though, beacause I went to the same school as the defendants. I was held there for 3 days though (not literally), and I only got $15 a day. from 8am - 5pm.

I had to miss work, and all I got was $15 a day. And I HAD to do it.




posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:27 AM
link   
I had jury duty but never served on a jury. I think I was too "libertarian-thinking" to be picked to serve on a jury. They were looking for people who were predisposed to find the accused either guilty or innocent and I was way too open-minded.

I wanted to, though. I think it would be fascinating!



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 10:16 AM
link   
Jury nullification should be taught in kindergarden through grade 12. This is one of the only means to hold the Gov't in account for stupid laws that abuse power.
Jury nullification is why the IRS doesn't want to have to have Juries during tax cases.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 10:25 AM
link   
I've been called twice. The experience CERTAINLY made me wonder how evolved we are, but not for the reasons you'd think.

The first time was fairly agreeable, except that I was seen in public saying something that I now know is completely naive. I was excused because I was asked if I could weigh a police officer's testimony objectively. I said yes, assuming that the other witness had as little reason to lie as a police officer would.

(Later I found out that sometimes law enforcement is so overburdened that things don't get documented until months later, and they just stamp the right date on it to make everything look kosher)


The second time really made me question the future of the human race. It was in April, the week before my school took spring break. I got a summons that was going to conflict with finals. Having the right to postphone for 60 days though, I could have pushed it back into late June and served, so I called to tell them so.

They asked if I'd like to move it up to coincide with spring break. I said no, I have papers to write, push it back to late June. They said OK. I assumed I was done and hung up. Apparently I hung up too soon.

My new summons came about a week later. They had moved my date forward to the day following my call. The summons reached me 5 days after I should have appeared. I'm not really sure if this was malicious or just incredibly stupid.

At that point I decided that whatever the California Justice system was planning to use me for was probably not very well thought out, so I threw away the warning letters they sent me afterwards.

Next time I get a summons I'll still respond and serve, but their people had better be on their A-Game or I just might end up standing trial rather than sitting for one.


Edit to add: Has anybody else here come to think of Jury duty as a form of free entertainment? The things people will say to get out... and the most outrageous ones always backfire the hardest.

I remember one lady who claimed she was the only one in her workplace who could start the computer system in the morning. The judge questioned this, obviously. Without batting an eye she responds, "I work in a carwash, it's 2 dozen Mexicans and me." That one failed on many levels, and though it didn't get her held in contempt surprisingly enough, I suspect it might have gotten her beaten in the parkinglot later.

[edit on 1-8-2006 by The Vagabond]



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 11:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by iori_komei
Is'nt obeying the law though more something you have to do, rather than a duty?


Just to clarify the terminology:




Duty

2 a : obligatory tasks, conduct, service, or functions that arise from one's position (as in life or in a group) b (1) : assigned service or business (2) : active military service (3) : a period of being on duty
3 a : a moral or legal obligation b : the force of moral obligation

www.m-w.com...



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:59 PM
link   
I've been called for jury duty several times. The first time my Mom sent my regrets to the court as I was serving in Greece with the Navy. The last 3 times I've reported and been excused because of my job. I would appsolutly serve if called and selected it is both a duty and honor to serve as a juror. It was disappointing to be excused based on my job. I believe that I have the ability to be fair and impartial. Maybe I'll be selected after I retire.



posted on Aug, 19 2006 @ 12:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by iori_komei


I honestly don't believe we have a duty to the state, rather the
other way around, but if we have any kind of duty, it's to live
the way we want to, and stand up for what we believe.


Though we do have some duties to the state, jury duty is not one of them.
Jury duty is a duty to your fellow citizens. Your friends, your family, your
co-workers, and all the other crazy little people in this country. It's your duty
to them to insure that if you are ever wrongly accused, that your jury is there for you.

I think I've only been asked to sit once. I was going through an old stack of mail and
found a request for service. It was a few months old. I never recieved anything about
it after, and no phone calls. I would have gone if I had done my duty
to open my
mail in a reasonable time.


Jury duty, IMO is a staple of our country, and to step down from it for reasons other
than acceptable, is frankly, a disservice to everyone in this country. It could be
argued it's a disservice to everyone.



posted on Aug, 19 2006 @ 12:49 AM
link   
I've never been called for Jury Duty.

If I were called upon, I would be delighted to serve.



posted on Aug, 28 2006 @ 05:38 AM
link   
Called twice, excused the first time as I was in college 4hrs from home.

I'm not sure how it works elsewhere, but here you are given a block of time that you need to be available, say 30 days. Any time during those 30 days you may be called in to serve.

I was called in twice during my time period. First case was for bad checks. We deliberated about 20 minutes and found the defendant not guilty. It floored the prosecutor and the defendant. Second was a child abuse case. We ended up being a hung jury. Turns out we were the SECOND hung jury on the case and the D.A. just about collapsed when we made our decision. We were polled and I never felt more violated by hundreds of pairs of eyes in my life.

I wouldn't say I felt "honored" to serve. It is my civic duty, therefore I did it. One thing that does irk me is the money I lost by not working for six days. The $20 a day was a joke. There must be a better way to compensate jurors or even have professional jurors.



posted on Aug, 28 2006 @ 05:54 AM
link   
Yes i have been called before with a letter in the mail but due to work comitments i was unable to do jury duty. I was curious about a month later wonder what the case was.



posted on Aug, 28 2006 @ 08:41 AM
link   

Originally posted by iori_komei
Not quite sure if I would or not, the only problem I have with it,
is that they force you to, and you get in trouble if you don't,
and in my opinion that's unlawful, and sh/could be considered
unlawful imprisonment.

Now, if I were asked to, and was'nt being forced to, than yes,
I would do it, not because I believe it some kind of honour or duty,
as others believe, and I'm not saying they're wrong in believing such,
since we all have the right to believe as we choose, rather I would do
it just to experience something I've not experienced before.

and

I honestly don't believe we have a duty to the state, rather the
other way around, but if we have any kind of duty, it's to live
the way we want to, and stand up for what we believe.


If your fate were in the hands of a jury, would you want them to read that?

I personally think it is a very small price to pay for living in our country. People complain about our country and laws all the time, but when given the opportunity to do something about it in some small way, can't be inconvenienced.

I was called for jury duty one time, was excused for work-related reasons, and would glady serve again.



posted on Aug, 28 2006 @ 08:50 AM
link   
I've never been called to Jury Duty, which I find to be comewhat unfortunate. I see so many people that try anything they can do weasel their way out that I know, and here I am wanting to fulfill my obligation for society. Alas, I haven't been called yet, but I would be more than willing to go. $15 dollars a day stinks, but I would hope that if I was on trial, that people would be there that would be attentive, and not just bored out of their minds and not paying attention the the case.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 08:04 PM
link   
reply to post by niteboy82
 


i realize this is an old thread, but i didn't want to start up a new "jury duty" thread since this one excisted.

i have been called twice to jury duty since 1988. the most recently was today. so far i never served. out of the fifty or so people in the jury waiting room, i was one of two or three that actually wanted to participate on a jury. most people were already giving reasons to fellow jurrors why they can't serve. it sounded like they were practicing for the time of selection from the judge.

the whole experience got me to think......
i hope i NEVER EVER have to be tried by a jury. seeing how most just want to go home and watch television. i wouldn't want my life in the hands of these people. i don't think people realize just how important it is to serve. that someone's life is in their hands. the judge tells the prospective jurrors how serious our duty is. they heard the statements but i don't think they listened. after the judge left, and all that was left was us jurrors in the room, there were mumblings from fellow jurrors of how they wanted to just go home. i was left with the impression that most of the people couldn't care less about what happens to the defendants.

i hope to serve on a jury one day.

maybe i'll wear my ATS shirt while sitting in on the trial. ha ha ha

-subfab



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 08:06 PM
link   
county sheriffs and jury nullification may be the only two serious protections from big brother that the peeps really have
use em



What is Jury Nullification?
Jury nullification is a constitutional doctrine that allows juries to acquit defendants who are technically guilty, but who don’t deserve punishment. When a jury disregards the evidence and acquts an otherwise guilty defendant, it has practiced jury nullification. The jury is saying that the law is unfair, either generally or in this particular case.

Jury Nullification is perfectly legal and has a long history- indeed the framers of the Constitution intended jurors to serve as a check on bad prosecutions and ineffective laws. Northern jurors helped abolish slavery by refusing to convict people "guilty" of helping slaves escape. Nullification was also a factor in ending Prohibition, which locked up people for selling liquor, and created the same violent market and drive-by shootings (remember Al Capone?) that we now see for other illegal drugs

www.letsgetfreethebook.com...
edit on 12-4-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 08:18 PM
link   
I was called to jury duty once, was sent to a jury selection within the first 30 minutes, and was seated on a jury. I thought it was pretty neat to take part in our justice system in such a way. Better to be on a jury than be a defendant! It was a DUI case with two charges we had to decide on. We found the guy not guilty on one charge (unable to operate a vehicle safely - cop never did a field sobriety test) and we found him guilty on the other (blood alcohol level). I did find, however, that I couldn't actually look at the defendant during the trial because I am a softy and would've probably felt way too bad about judging him and finding him guilty of anything if he was putting on a good emotional show. So I ignored him completely and just paid attention to the lawyers and witnesses. Anyway, it was a good experience, and I'd do it again. Made me respect our justice system a little bit more than I did before. Also made me dislike cops more than I did before because of the way the bozo officer in this trial behaved, eyes rolling and totally cocky attitude.

ETA: Everyone on the jury on which I sat took it very seriously. I was pleased to see that.
edit on 12-4-2012 by drunkennoodle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 10:01 PM
link   
Whilst I personally feel that I would likely choose to take part anyway (assuming I agreed with the law) I do not feel it should be mandatory.

Partly because I don't like the idea of having the situation forced on me, but mainly because, if I wasn't at a good point in my life (stress at work or home etc) then I will not be acting as best I could on a jury. And when I am potentially taking part in a decision that may affect someones freedom I think I need to be at my absolute best mentally.

For example, I am currently having a long drawn-out training period at my place of work so that when my boss retires I can apply for his position despite being young and having no manegerial experience. I have to make up for the knowledge I wont have with knowledge any outsider to the company can't have. If I was called for dury duty now, my mind would constantly be saying 'this is ruining my chance of a promotion' and I would be distracted from paying the attention I should.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 11:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Danbones
county sheriffs and jury nullification may be the only two serious protections from big brother that the peeps really have
use em



What is Jury Nullification?
Jury nullification is a constitutional doctrine that allows juries to acquit defendants who are technically guilty, but who don’t deserve punishment. When a jury disregards the evidence and acquts an otherwise guilty defendant, it has practiced jury nullification. The jury is saying that the law is unfair, either generally or in this particular case.

Jury Nullification is perfectly legal and has a long history- indeed the framers of the Constitution intended jurors to serve as a check on bad prosecutions and ineffective laws. Northern jurors helped abolish slavery by refusing to convict people "guilty" of helping slaves escape. Nullification was also a factor in ending Prohibition, which locked up people for selling liquor, and created the same violent market and drive-by shootings (remember Al Capone?) that we now see for other illegal drugs

www.letsgetfreethebook.com...
edit on 12-4-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)


i heard of this before. i wanted to mention it in my post but couldn't remember what it was called. thank you
jury duty is a place where you have a voice.


-subfab



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 11:31 PM
link   
I got summoned to jury duty next week. This will be my first time and not sure how it will go. From what I heard, you sit in a room all day unless they call you for a trial. Not looking forward to it!!
edit on 12-4-2012 by Alchemst7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 11:33 PM
link   
reply to post by GradyPhilpott
 


I encourage you to check out the Fully informed Jury Association. fija.org...

There is more to jury duty then just punishing criminals, nullification, etc... There is also a section there on the grand jury...

edit on 12-4-2012 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 11:52 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





new topics
top topics
 
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join