It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

It's "would have", not "would of"...

page: 1
0
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 30 2006 @ 06:09 PM
link   
I must have seen this 50 times today alone. I am not the best when it comes to English grammar, but this one irks the hell out of me.

"If I would of known...."

I think this stems from using the contraction "would've", it sounds much like "would of".

Are people becoming more illiterate these days, or is it just me?

It is would have, dammit!!

Okay, I feel better now.




posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 10:46 AM
link   
I undersand. My pet peeve is "you're" vs. "your". "Your correct", "your going", like that just drives me nuts. And it's a short drive.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 10:59 AM
link   
LOL Mechanic 32 that cracked me up. Hey there is another one floating around here which is- anyways- . Brilliant smart people use it just like its correct are something, please tell me that its not correct to say anyways.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:09 AM
link   
How about Conversating? As in...

He and I were conversating when.....

God I hate that.

[edit on 31-7-2006 by Rasobasi420]



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:21 AM
link   
One of mine is verbal.....supposeably or maybe supposably....I can't even figure how its spelled.

It's....SUPPOSEDLY....



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:23 AM
link   



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:32 AM
link   
Could of used this link instead..

**Deja Vu Alert**



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 01:12 PM
link   
Yes, your correct, they could of used that link. Supposebly. But we're just conversating here.
:bnghd:



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 05:58 AM
link   


You must of been reading the same threads as me.If people are going to conversate they should at least get there terminology write.

Supposably the English language is in decline but your correct anyways.

Mabe we shud start a speling thred on hear.Or an ENGLISH/AMERICUN convershun won.

As four been iliterut.. I have a mom and dad thank yew..



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 06:20 AM
link   
Its not conversating, its conversing.

Use small penney words if you don't know the 25 cent words.

One of my all time *
* is noone. It is no one. No one knows how to spell this.

How about baby talk? If u cn c me .....

Then= than

And the worse part is the culprits are English speaking.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:11 PM
link   


It's "would have", not "would of"...



LA DI DA. Did you understand what was meant? It's like when someone has an accent....it's the same words, just sounds different....or maybe a wrong word here or there mixed in as well. BUT YOU KNOW WHAT THEY ARE SAYING!

No need to be snotty about it.....
:shk:



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:13 PM
link   


Use small penney words if you don't know the 25 cent words.



djtempe...WOW!! You go right after those terrible grammar errors like a Grammar Nazi and YET....you don't seem to know how to spell penny. Did Dan Quayle teach you how to spell that??

penney? Maybe you should stick to one syllable words!



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:16 PM
link   


Yes, your correct, they could of used that link. Supposebly. But we're just conversating here.



This deserves a WATS! Thanks for the job done good!



posted on Aug, 2 2006 @ 12:54 AM
link   
Geez, if I would of known that their were others that felt the same way... [misspellings intended]



Yup, never fails. An otherwise perfect post ruined by those two little words.

Could of is just as bad. Noticed that one once today.



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 04:49 AM
link   
Thank you! This annoys the hell out of me too! I don't care what the message is, if i see a post with multiple spelling errors and wrds lyke dis, I'll ignore the post. I can't point it out to them either, cause then I'm the ugly banana. Is it really that hard to remember a few rules?



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 04:50 PM
link   


Is it really that hard to remember a few rules?



What rules are you talking about? Curious...thanks!



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 04:58 PM
link   
I've found my new favorite!!!!!

I have to add this to my pet peeve list.....
Why do people (news anchors especially) say "It's AN Historic event"?

It's not AN Historic.... it's A Historic!

Did they take AN History class in school?
Do they live in AN House?
Have they flown in AN Helicopter???
Did they lend AN Helping hand????

UGH!!!

Yes, the pronunciation of the letter "H" on it's own, starts with a vowel sound, so you WOULD say, AN "H" But the phoenetic SOUND of the letter is a consonant. SO there is no need to make it "AN" when "H" is the 1st letter of the word.

It's A House
A History class
A historic event.
etc......


ANd don't get me started on "THEN" and "THAN".....
GRRRRRRR


I LOVE this thread!!! (did I mention that???)



posted on Aug, 3 2006 @ 05:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by marko1970
It's not AN Historic.... it's A Historic!


Actually I thought it was proper to say "an historic event".

So, I did some checking, and yes you are correct!!


his·tor·ic Pronunciation (h-stôrk, -str-)
adj.
1. Having importance in or influence on history.
2. Historical.
Usage Note: Historic and historical have different usages, though their senses overlap. Historic refers to what is important in history: the historic first voyage to the moon. It is also used of what is famous or interesting because of its association with persons or events in history: a historic house. Historical refers to whatever existed in the past, whether regarded as important or not: a minor historical character. Historical also refers to anything concerned with history or the study of the past: a historical novel; historical discoveries. While these distinctions are useful, these words are often used interchangeably, as in historic times or historical times.
Boldface mine, for reference


source = www.thefreedictionary.com...


who would have known??

[edit on 8/3/2006 by Mechanic 32]



posted on Aug, 4 2006 @ 12:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by Excitable_Boy

What rules are you talking about? Curious...thanks!


Maybe you don't call them rules in English? I was talking about some of the most basic grammatic rules. Sorry for not making that clear.



posted on Aug, 4 2006 @ 09:07 AM
link   

Originally posted by Mechanic 32

Originally posted by marko1970
It's not AN Historic.... it's A Historic!


Actually I thought it was proper to say "an historic event".

So, I did some checking, and yes you are correct!!


his·tor·ic Pronunciation (h-stôrk, -str-)
adj.
1. Having importance in or influence on history.
2. Historical.
Usage Note: Historic and historical have different usages, though their senses overlap. Historic refers to what is important in history: the historic first voyage to the moon. It is also used of what is famous or interesting because of its association with persons or events in history: a historic house. Historical refers to whatever existed in the past, whether regarded as important or not: a minor historical character. Historical also refers to anything concerned with history or the study of the past: a historical novel; historical discoveries. While these distinctions are useful, these words are often used interchangeably, as in historic times or historical times.
Boldface mine, for reference


source = www.thefreedictionary.com...


who would have known??

[edit on 8/3/2006 by Mechanic 32]



LOL!!!
I appreciate the research & sharing of your findings!



I've actually never even thought about checking the dictionary on that one.
I just always thought is sounded wrong..... mainly because of the examples I gave about house, helicopter.... etc.

Too funny!

Here's another one that irks me....
You ask someone a question... They reply, "Ohh, I have no ideal."
WHAT??? Did you mean, "No IDEA"?

HAHAHA!!!



I'm sure I'll hear even more of them today, & I'll share with you if & when I do!



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join