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Temperature In Space?

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posted on Jul, 29 2006 @ 03:19 PM
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It's a question i can't find an answer to. As there is no air in space to be tempered what would the outside temperature be just out of earths atmosphere or on the moon. Would it be below freezing or would it be mega hot because there is no protection from the sun. Either way im guessing it cant be too extreme?




posted on Jul, 29 2006 @ 03:29 PM
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cold, because the lack of moving particles makes cold, like light, theres dark UNTIL light comes, its cold UNTIL heat comes, correct me if im wrong



posted on Jul, 29 2006 @ 03:33 PM
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ok.. but how cold? Is there a 'standard' coldness like with light, theres a limit to how dark it can be. Brightness can go up and up but darkness can only go as dark as pitch black. temperature can go either way infinitely theoretically right?



posted on Jul, 29 2006 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
ok.. but how cold? Is there a 'standard' coldness like with light, theres a limit to how dark it can be. Brightness can go up and up but darkness can only go as dark as pitch black. temperature can go either way infinitely theoretically right?


A Vacuum has a temperature of approximately 2 degrees kelvin(On average)

No it cannot go infinitely either way. 0 Degrees kelvin is the point where all thermodynamic motion stops. According to Quantum Mechanics, it's reaching 0 degrees kelvin may well be impossible due to quantum uncertanty.

[edit on 29-7-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 03:53 PM
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Good question,

Not sure my physics professor would pass me for this answer (almost 20 years ago) but my understanding of how things are follows:

Temperature is associated with material objects; kinetic motion of molecules.
Something has to be able to exibit molecular motion for a temperatrue to be measured.

That being said a themometer in space would respond displaying the temperature of its mercury (or a thermocouple would respond likewise). The temperature of the themometer in space would depend on its absorption of heat from a heat source such as the sun or material body.

In the abscence of a heat source such as the sun I believe the temperature of space would approach absolute zero.

Joseph



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 06:38 PM
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In the abscence of a heat source such as the sun I believe the temperature of space would approach absolute zero.


Logically, that's what you would think, but it appears this is not the case. I've talked to a bunch of people in the know about this and they seem to think it's impossible to reach Absolute Zero and Measure it to confiim as the measurment itself will heat it back up to above AZ instantly.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
It's a question i can't find an answer to. As there is no air in space to be tempered what would the outside temperature be just out of earths atmosphere or on the moon. Would it be below freezing or would it be mega hot because there is no protection from the sun. Either way im guessing it cant be too extreme?


For the moon:

Surface temperatures range from about 220 F when the sun is shining on it, to -280 F when it is in darkness.

As a side note, LEO vehicles tend to see the same temperature swings.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 08:28 PM
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What?

A Vaccume itself cannot have a temperature, as there is nothing to retain heat, nor lose it.

If you were to take a temperature reading in space, the only thing you'd be measuring is the temperature of the thermometer itself, or whatever object it is connected to.

If the object, or face of the object, in question is obscured from the sun, it can potentially leak all remaining heat within itself over time.

If the object, or objects face is in line of sight of the sun, then that side will heat up... obviously.

But space itself does not have a temperature, it cannot. Only an object within that space can be measured... but the results are pretty useless, as its the thermometers own temperature due to radiant sources that you would be measuring.

If you were to measure the surface temperature of the moon, thats fine, as it is an object to be measured, but you have to ask, lightside or darkside?

As for outside of our atmosphere, no, you cannot measure the temperature of space. Only that which exists within it.



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by johnsky
If you were to take a temperature reading in space, the only thing you'd be measuring is the temperature of the thermometer itself, or whatever object it is connected to.


I hate to sound so dumb, but with the possible exception of the laser and infrared thermometers, isn't this what thermometers do anywhere.

[edit on 2006/7/31 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:01 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...
Temperature of the vacuum

The temperature of an object is proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in it. In a pure vacuum, there are no molecules. There is nothing to measure the kinetic energy of, and temperature is undefined. If a thermometer were placed in a vacuum, the reading would be a measurement of the internal temperature of the thermometer, not of the vacuum which surrounds it.

All objects emit black body radiation. Over time, a thermometer in a pure vacuum will radiate away thermal energy, decreasing in temperature indefinitely until it reaches the zero-point energy limit.

In practice, there is no such thing as a pure vacuum since there will always be photons associated with the black body radiation of the walls of the vacuum. A thermometer orbiting the Earth can easily absorb energy from sunlight faster than it can radiate it away. This can lead to a dramatic temperature increase.

A thermometer isolated from solar radiation (in the shade of a larger body, for example) is still exposed to Cosmic microwave background radiation. In this case, the temperature will change until the rate of energy loss and gain are in equilibrium. At this point, the thermometer will have a temperature of 2.725 K, which is often referred to as the temperature of space.


Here is the best answer I've read (I've seen this a couple times in the past in various places).



posted on Jul, 31 2006 @ 11:54 PM
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You would probably FRY or VAPORIZE your butt in a split SECOND and at night your whole body will turn to a chunk of ice at the same time frame WITHOUT your space suit on

Thats why you need to have space suits.....

[edit on 31-7-2006 by as400]

[edit on 31-7-2006 by as400]

[edit on 31-7-2006 by as400]

[edit on 31-7-2006 by as400]



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 01:14 AM
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Yeah, I can agree with that.

It would be pretty dumb to go out there without a suit on anyways, and I'm not referring to a tuxedo.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 01:35 AM
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I don't remember where, but I do remember hearing that you
could survive in the vaacuum of spcae for like 5-10 swconds,
that's assuming you get back into a heated, pressurised environment,
though you would still have damage to unprotected areas and areas
not protected significantly enough.

Also, like it's been said, space can't be absolute zero.

Though I have read that Intergalactic spae is less than a degree kelvin, I think it was suppose to be like 0.357K.

[edit on 8/1/2006 by iori_komei]



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 02:07 AM
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OK, here's a question: How does air-conditioning work in space?

With no molecules to pass-off the heat to, where does the heat go? That wikipedia article said "All objects emit black body radiation. Over time, a thermometer in a pure vacuum will radiate away thermal energy, decreasing in temperature indefinitely until it reaches the zero-point energy limit. " But what is black body radiation? How long does it take to leech away all heat?

If it goes slowly, then why would an astronaut freeze up quickly when exposed to a vacuum?



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 08:28 AM
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In a vacuum woth no air and if your in the Sun in space, you will melt away as your blood begins to boil...in seconds...



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 09:43 AM
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Heat can reflect off surfaces like moons and planets. However, there would be some degree of ionic temperature( microwave radiation) or cosmic radiation. Being it is too dangerous to expose oneself to the vacuum of space; except via a spacesuit-it is hard to test it's affects.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 12:32 PM
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Correct me if I am wrong; but space isnt a 100% vacum right? I mean, a planet like Earth 'leaks' hydrogen, protons and other low-weight atoms all the time, right? And a space station leaks things too (I would think so at least, toilet 'leftovers' and such for instance) and I would'nt expect those things to be caught up by the gravity of other space objects, when you have to account for the laws of thermodynamics and the vast infinite space..

Of course, it wouldnt influence temperature much, but it wouldnt be 0° K.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 12:57 PM
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Heat can transfer in three different ways, conduction, convection or radiation. Most are familiar with the first two, but in space it is done through solar radiation, similar to electromagnetic waves. They can travel through a vacuum and are absorbed and causes the temperature to rise. When cooling off, it radiates back off the same way.

en.wikipedia.org...

The best thing to do to avoid overheating in space is to use a shield to block the solar radiation.


[edit on 8/1/2006 by Hal9000]



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
It's a question i can't find an answer to. As there is no air in space to be tempered what would the outside temperature be just out of earths atmosphere or on the moon. Would it be below freezing or would it be mega hot because there is no protection from the sun. Either way im guessing it cant be too extreme?


While your correct in saying that there is no air in space to be tempered with, if your close enough to the sun, then your fried. However , as you get farther and farther away from the sun, its power becomes limited, and you can eventually survive as long as you can hold your breath.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by fiftyfifty
It's a question i can't find an answer to. As there is no air in space to be tempered what would the outside temperature be just out of earths atmosphere or on the moon. Would it be below freezing or would it be mega hot because there is no protection from the sun. Either way im guessing it cant be too extreme?


While your correct in saying that there is no air in space to be tempered with, if your close enough to the sun, then your fried. However , as you get farther and farther away from the sun, its power becomes limited, and you can eventually survive as long as you can hold your breath.



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