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Superconducting wire breaks record

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posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 08:09 PM
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physicsweb.org...


A US firm claims to have sent commercial levels of electric current down long (100 metre) lengths of "second generation" high-temperature superconducting wire for the first time. American Superconductor says that its breakthrough achievement could speed up the acceptance of high-temperature superconductor technology in the market place. The firm's second-generation wire -- made from yttrium, barium copper and oxygen (YBCO) -- is cheaper to manufacture and retains its superconducting abilities better under magnetic fields than "first-generation" wire.

...

First-generation HTS wires -- made from bismuth, strontium, calcium copper oxide (BSCCO) -- have been on the market for some time ... But because these wires cost more than 100 times as much to make, they have not been a huge success in the marketplace.

...

Second-generation wires ... have been more promising. Unfortunately, YBCO is not an easy material to work with because it forms an array of grains as it is deposited on a substrate, the boundaries between which have to line up exactly so that pairs of electrons can flow from one grain to the next.

American Superconductor has now been able to make ribbon-shaped YBCO wires that are 100 metres long and just 4-mm wide. It made them by depositing YBCO onto a substrate of nickel alloy, which has highly aligned grains that the YBCO grains can in turn follow. The firms says its wires can carry a current of up to 140 Amperes when cooled with liquid nitrogen -- about 150 times as much as a standard copper wire of the same dimension. "Just one of these wires would be able to carry enough power to serve the needs of approximately 1000 homes," says Alex Malozemoff, the firm's chief technical officer.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Quite a large step as well, if their claims are true that is. Will have to see how cheap it is before I make any assumptions as to the viability of this. Hopefully a step in the right direction.




posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 11:23 PM
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What they do not mention is the amount of energy needed to cool the wires in order for it to superconduct and to send commercial amounts of electricity down the wire (or how long it lasted).

The yttrium based cuprates were discovered sometime in the late 80's. Before yttrium base were the lanthinide base cuprates, very interesting if you look at the periodic chart. I would not call this noteworthy, let alone newsworthy. I think this kind of propoganda is reflective of the stagnat market for superconductors. Most commerical superconductors are ceramics; making them brittle. What is greatly desired, and what could make one a fortune, is a room temperature superconductor. Not to mention it should be made from cheap raw materials. Yttrium? That has to be expensive.

Though, funny story, I heard some superconductor manufactures are selling their ceramics as body armour.



posted on Jul, 27 2006 @ 01:16 PM
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so i guess that answers my question, it wasnt clear for me in the artcle if they needed to super cool the wires, i guess the do using liguid nitrogen. It would be cool if they could make superconducting wires that run at room temprature. I am thinking some kinda copper that is alligned like it says in the article. Maybe a copper crystal or something ? Im guessing its all in the manufacture process, when making copper its heated and all of the atoms get jarred and disoriented imposeing resistance. Does anyone think making copper with a process that would align the atoms in a more uniform direction would make any diffrence ?



posted on Apr, 22 2016 @ 06:11 PM
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Resurrecting a thread because this announcement is dealing exactly with what was discussed above. Besides, what is ten years between scientific discoveries?


[R]esearchers at the National Laboratory for Intense Magnetic Fields (LNCMI) in Toulouse, France, uncovered a key property of the crystal, a matte-black ceramic in a class of materials called cuprates that are the most potent superconductors known. The findings, reported today in the journal Nature, provide a major clue about the inner workings of cuprates, and may help scientists understand how these materials allow electricity to flow freely at relatively high temperatures.

[Researchers] used their 90-tesla magnet — which creates a magnetic field nearly two million times as strong as the one enshrouding Earth — to momentarily strip away superconductivity in their cuprate sample. This revealed details of the underlying phase from which the behavior seems to arise.

With the veil lifted, the scientists discovered a sharp change in behavior at what appears to be a “quantum critical point” in cuprates, reminiscent of the freezing point of water. Theorists have long speculated that such a quantum critical point might exist, and that it could play a key role in superconductivity, said Andrey Chubukov, a condensed-matter theorist at the University of Minnesota. “One thing is to say this; another thing is to measure it,” Chubukov said.
...
[C]uprates superconduct at much higher temperatures than other materials, suggesting that their electrons are paired by a different and stronger glue. But cuprates must still be cooled below minus 100 degrees Celsius before they become superconductive. The glue must be further strengthened if superconductors’ operating temperatures are to be dialed up. For 30 years scientists have asked: What is the glue — or, more precisely, the quantum mechanical interaction between electrons — that causes superconductivity to arise in cuprates?

While the detection of a quantum critical point does not definitively answer that question... [their finding] knocks several proposals for the electron-pairing glue in cuprates out of the running.

Source: QuantaMagazine.org, Feb. 22, 2016 - The Quantum Secret to Superconductivity

So the battle ground for YBCO's super conductivity was tested by creating four different sized-holed YBCO samples as their theoretical candidates. They placed the sample inside a 90 Tesla superconducting magnet hooked up to 600 super capacitors. When the sample was cooled, they triggered the magnet which destroys the superconducting properties in the sample. They ran several different currents through the magnet and measured the YBCO sample.


Normally, this “carrier density” increases gradually as a function of doping. But at a critical point, it would be expected to change suddenly, indicating a spontaneous reorganization of the electrons in the crystal. And that’s what the scientists measured: a sharp, sixfold jump in the carrier density at 19 percent doping, the expected location of the critical point.


Besides getting to play with a 90 Tesla magnet (that is just insane!), they narrowed the possibilities down to two different theories they need to research. One follows what they know and have observed about SC magnets so far, the other is newer quantum theory that is not fully understand (they do not want to have to figure it out while working on their experiment to demonstrate it).

So what, right? Well if they can pinpoint both the theory and the "critical point" that cuprates become super conductive then they can engineer exactly the formula needed to create a cuprate further up the temperature scale (i.e., room temperature superconductors).

edit on 22-4-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: clarity



posted on Apr, 22 2016 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: imbalanced
so i guess that answers my question, it wasnt clear for me in the artcle if they needed to super cool the wires, i guess the do using liguid nitrogen. It would be cool if they could make superconducting wires that run at room temprature. I am thinking some kinda copper that is alligned like it says in the article. Maybe a copper crystal or something ? Im guessing its all in the manufacture process, when making copper its heated and all of the atoms get jarred and disoriented imposeing resistance. Does anyone think making copper with a process that would align the atoms in a more uniform direction would make any diffrence ?


You are right about finding a room temp super conductor.

Not sure about it being copper based, tho.



posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: burgerbuddy


The prediction was that "Cooper pairs" of electrons in a superconductor could exist in two possible states. They could form a "superfluid" where all the particles are in the same quantum state and all move as a single entity, carrying current with zero resistance—what we usually call a superconductor. Or the Cooper pairs could periodically vary in density across space, a so-called "Cooper pair density wave." For decades, this novel state has been elusive, possibly because no instrument capable of observing it existed.
...
[They] studied a cuprate incorporating bismuth, strontium, and calcium (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8) using an incredibly sensitive STM that scans a surface with sub-nanometer resolution
...
[The scanning technique] reveals the density of Cooper pairs at any point, and it showed periodic variations across the sample, with a wavelength of four crystal unit cells. The team had found a Cooper pair density wave state in a high-temperature superconductor, confirming the 50-year-old prediction.

Source: Phys.org - Elusive state of superconducting matter discovered after 50 years

Well there you go! No copper involved! Which is great because it shows how cuprates operate in general. The answer is "Cooper pair density waves" due to variations of the surface! Now to make better cuprates that push the thermal envelop higher.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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I do not know if this is legit because I would think it would be all over the news if it is.


The most synergistic combination of elements found to facilitate high-temperature superconductivity are tin, tellurium, barium, and manganese in a copper-oxide matrix... Since Tc has previously been found to correlate directly with planar weight ratio (PWR), three new compounds with these same elements were synthesized using progressively higher planar weight ratios in each. The results reveal that superconductivity is still possible at temperatures as high as 187 Celsius (460K/368F), giving new meaning to the term "warm superconductor."

Source: superconductors.org news, April 29, 2016 - Blistering Hot Superconductivity at 167C, 178C and 187C

What?! That cannot be true! The subtitle reads, "Still no upper limit in sight"!

So they layer the stuff in odd and even layers of materials. Then they heat it under pressure. Bake for a few hours (10). Then cool. The resulting ceramic is highly attracted to water (hygroscopic comment noted at end). There are graphs, and it took me a second to realize "Tc" is "thermalcouple" which would have helped to know first off. They said they had to add antimony to even get a resistance value!!

Anybody else know if this is real or not?

(PS - This about magnets not wires like OP. But where you have one...)
edit on 2-5-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: clarity



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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OK. Previous post may have been too optimistic! It seems they are "recording" these superconducting magnet feats for fractions of seconds (like billionths). Phew. So, yeah they are measuring zero resistance but not continuously.

The site has links back to phys.org and read an article there about buckyballs and lasers. I will keep an eye on this site.



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