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Quick Question, What is inbetween electrons and nuclei?

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posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 12:40 AM
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Originally posted by jumpspace
gfad:


Originally posted by gfad
Magnetic fields attracting is a different thing to opposite charges attracting.


Hmmm...

Are you saying that a charge hasn't got a magnetic field?

Cheers

JS


Actually, technically using the language of physics, it doesn't unless it is moving. A stationary particle has an electrical field which extends radially from the particle (like the rays of the sun), and it is referred to as an E field. A moving charge has a magnetic field which encircle the moving charge like a cylinder, and is called an H field.

And to add insult to injury, you are correct in theory, as interestingly enough, they are one and the same thing. If you dig deep enough you will find that the H field of a moving charge is actually caused by the relativistic effect of the speed of the particle, and how that affects the E field. In other words, the electrons will move in the wire, but the protons are stationary, therefore relativistic effects will cause the two types of particles to become imbalanced, i.e. the distance between the electrons will shrink. I would have to look up the details on it, as I don't have it off the top of my head.

It is very interesting though. Nice topic.

Oh ya, and for the original poster, you have a very excellent point. And here is another reason. "Spooky action at a distance", which essentially is an instantaneous cause and effect relationship between 2 particles at any arbitrary distance apart... That is a very very strong argument in my mind for some sort of universal connection between all particles, over and above these so called gravitons, and the like.

TheMesh




posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 12:53 AM
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TheMesh:




...you are correct in theory, as interestingly enough, they are one and the same thing


Yes, sorry I should have been more clear. I was generalizing as I see a magnetic/electrostatic/electric field as one and the same.

One thing I was thinking about recently though:

Has anyone actually worked out what binds the protons together in the nucleas?

Theoretically, they should repell each other but they don't.

Cheers

JS



posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 12:56 AM
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What about sub-atomic particles? They seem to appear one moment,and are gone the next. We have no idea where it is they go when they leave,but they have to go somewhere. But then you get into quantum theory,and inter-dimensional theories and whatnot.



posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 03:33 AM
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Originally posted by jumpspace
Has anyone actually worked out what binds the protons together in the nucleas?

Theoretically, they should repell each other but they don't.


Yeah they have ... the protons are held together by the Strong Force, one of the four fundamental forces. The strong force is very strong (as the name suggests) to overcome the repulsion between the charged molecules but its strength falls off very quickly so only acts on distances of the order of an atomic nucleus.

If you want to get deeper into it I think its commonly believed that actually the strong force doesnt act upon protons but on the quarks that make up the protons by gluon exchange.



posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 06:08 AM
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Originally posted by gfad

Originally posted by jumpspace
Has anyone actually worked out what binds the protons together in the nucleas?

Theoretically, they should repell each other but they don't.


Yeah they have ... the protons are held together by the Strong Force, one of the four fundamental forces. The strong force is very strong (as the name suggests) to overcome the repulsion between the charged molecules but its strength falls off very quickly so only acts on distances of the order of an atomic nucleus.

If you want to get deeper into it I think its commonly believed that actually the strong force doesnt act upon protons but on the quarks that make up the protons by gluon exchange.


Hmmm...

Do you know if they have worked out what causes this "Strong Force" or have they just come up with a force that they know exists that causes the protons to bond together?

I know this isn't a scientific publication and I can't make the claim and I don't even know if a claim has been made, but I reckon it's an inter-dimensional "anomoly" that's in the middle of the atom that's causing this Strong Force.

...so if anyone gets a Nobel Prize for this "revelation" in years to come, you can tell your grandkids that jumpspace was the one who really should have got the Nobel prize


Cheers

JS

[edit on 26-7-2006 by jumpspace]



posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by jumpspace
I know this isn't a scientific publication and I can't make the claim and I don't even know if a claim has been made, but I reckon it's an inter-dimensional "anomoly" that's in the middle of the atom that's causing this Strong Force.

...so if anyone gets a Nobel Prize for this "revelation" in years to come, you can tell your grandkids that jumpspace was the one who really should have got the Nobel prize



Im sorry .. I think you need to add more information than that for the Nobel prize, I dont think "interdimensional anomaly" cuts it!!




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