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Airbus With 200 People Crashes In Russia - Many Dead

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posted on Jul, 9 2006 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Well the old Soviet Russian Tupalovs aren't even allowed to fly over most if not all western nations because of their safety records.


As far as Boeing vs. Airbus my statements are completely anecdotal from my personal news-watching. If someone can find some actual data, please post it.


I would like some hard data too. But a search has not come up with anything definitive. I will share with you what I have found.

-Boing has a higher number of accidents than airbus. However, this is because there are far more boeings flying, so naturally, there would be more accidents. However, percentage wide, airbus has a higher rate of accidents and crashes.

-While Airbus has a higher percentage of crashes, it is also worth noting that airbuses are used more by airlines in third world countries, which often have abysmal safety standards and maintainence of their craft is poor, so it is very difficult to tell whether or not airbuses higher crash rate is due to the fact that they are not maintained well and fly in countries with lax safety regulations. Like Russia.

-Some boeing models are superior to the equivilant airbus model, and some airbus models are better

-so far, I have not seen any definiteve lists of comparisons made between airbus and boeing safety records, and most sites agree that such figures are really hard to find and interpret.

So basically the question of which is better comes down to personal experience, opinion, politics, ect.

The only opinion of preference i have is between the new Airbus giant and the boeing 7E7. I prefer boeing's idea, a faster jet that can get me from point a to point b in less time. Thats lass time in the air i have to spend ripping out my hair craving a cigarette. which is why a giant "skymall" with wings would not interest me.

But thats about it.




posted on Jul, 9 2006 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
Thats lass time in the air i have to spend ripping out my hair craving a cigarette. which is why a giant "skymall" with wings would not interest me.

But thats about it.



Totally agree with you there...what good is a fancy bar if you can't have a smoke or at least step out for one. Get me from A to B ASAP, forget the BS.



posted on Jul, 9 2006 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by Circa
LOL thats hilarious....Seriously, why should the u.s. care about who dies in russia? Why should anyone care who dies, if they have no relations, nor friendships.


I think your statement is ridiculous. Everyone in every country should care about innocent citizens in every other country in the world, whether our governments are buddy-buddy, enemies, or kind of neutral with one another. We're talking about people here! Geeze!

[edit on 7/9/2006 by djohnsto77]



posted on Jul, 9 2006 @ 06:18 PM
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No man is an island...
All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated...As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all: but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness....No man is an island, entire of itself...any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee."
John Donne


[edit on 7/9/2006 by donwhite]



posted on Jul, 9 2006 @ 06:38 PM
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Director of Russian Federal Security Service’s Office in Irkutsk Reported Among Passengers of Crashed Airplane

FOCUS News Agency

Irkutsk. The Director of the Department of the Russian Federal Security Service /FSS/ in Irkutsk Sergey Koryakov was onboard the passenger airplane, which crashed in Irkutsk on early Sunday, Interfax reported, citing the regional center of FSS. Koryakov was listed among the passengers, but his name is not in the list of people hospitalized after the accident.




www.focus-fen.net...







Previously, Koryakov was FSB chief in Ingushetia, Chechnya.


Here's what the Chechen Times had to say about him:





Ingushetia can breath easier. Its evil demon — Sergey Koryakov, the chief of UFSB has finally left Ingushetia.




www.chechentimes.org...


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posted on Jul, 10 2006 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Ivanova
Previously, Koryakov was FSB chief in Ingushetia, Chechnya.

Here's what the Chechen Times had to say about him:




Ingushetia can breath easier. Its evil demon — Sergey Koryakov, the chief of UFSB has finally left Ingushetia.




www.chechentimes.org...

Those bastards in Chechen Times have no value for human life



posted on Jul, 10 2006 @ 08:04 PM
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You have to remember that Russian aviation and its customs and procedures are very different from those in the West, although much of Russian carriers are quickly modernizing. This particular Airbus is a vary old airplane by Western standards. It has served with Pan Am and Delta. An aircraft this old requires high maintenance and thorough inspections. It is true that these procedures are not carried out as rigorously as in US.

As for Russian airline safety- most of your comments are overrated. Yes Russia is not the safest country to fly. But it has some of the most well trained and professional pilots in the world. Also it's aircraft industry as not as bad as you all are making it seems. The Ilushins (Il 86, 96) are very modern and very safe jets on par with Airbus. Most of the Tupolevs are rather old, but still very reliable. Most of the crashes of these planes happen outside Russia (Africa/Mid East) where they are not maintained to required minimum standards.

Still the Russian Tupolevs ARE ALLOWED TO FLEW TO EUROPE. Most of Russian jets are very sturdy, much more so than Western counterparts. The Tu's were designed to land on unpaved runways and snow, and withstand severe turbulance. Their engines are among the best in the world. Yes they had lots of accidents in Russia. But if you consider that they were manufactured in nearly as high numbers as Boeing 737 and Airbus 300, in Warsaw Pact countries, their safety rankings are not that bad. Yes it is a little frightening to fly the first time in those beasts, but you get used to it. If you are an airplane enthusiast, you will even enjoy what are called the best sounding jet turbines in the world.


By the way here is the statistics on Airbus vs Boeing accidents:
www.airdisaster.com...

Boeing 737, 757 and 767 are among the safetest large jets. While Boeing 747, and Airbus 310 and 300 rank rather low.



posted on Jul, 10 2006 @ 08:13 PM
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The thing about the 747 accidents though is that 99% of them were human error, not mechanical malfunction. Although 24 accidents for 14.8 MILLION flights is still pretty darned good.



posted on Aug, 5 2006 @ 09:27 PM
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They may have found the reason for the crash. Apparently, the left engine suddenly switched to take-off mode during the landing.


Regnum: Irkutsk catastrophe – new version: Airbus A310 engine mistook landing for take-off

08/03/2006



Experts of the Interstate Aviation Committee have reconstructed details of the Airbus A310 (Sibir Airlines) catching fire in Irkutsk Airport on July 9.

They learned that while landing the jet skidded of the runway, crashed into buildings and caught fire, because the left engine switched to a take-off regime while braking.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Nov, 22 2006 @ 11:36 PM
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Investigators claim that it was the crew's fault, since they didn't notice that the "reverse thruster mode" was deactivated on the left engine. It seems like another A-310 commander doesn't believe in this explaination.


RIA Novosti: Investigators blame pilots for Siberian air crash

22/11/2006



A committee looking into the cause of an airliner crash in East Siberia this summer announced Wednesday that the crew was responsible for the tragedy, a conclusion that pilots questioned.

"On landing, the crew commander automatically moved the thrust lever of the left engine without noticing that its reverse thruster mode was deactivated," the Interstate Aviation Committee said.

However, an A-310 commander at a Russian airline who spoke on condition of anonymity said that the commander of the crashed plane could neither have failed to notice that the engine was in takeoff mode while they were breaking nor accidentally have elbowed the lever. "Even if we imagine that it could happen like this, the commander could slow down the turbine," he added.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

This sounds a bit strange. Could it really have happened this way?



posted on Dec, 1 2006 @ 06:42 AM
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Another A-310 made an emergency landing in Irkutsk. The left wheel wouldn't deploy, but the backup hydraulic system worked...


ITAR TASS: Russia airliner, again A-310, makes emergency landing in Irkutsk

28.11.2006



An airliner with 184 passengers and 11 crewmembers on the board made an emergency landing in Irkutsk on Tuesday morning. The A-310 plane was coming from Moscow.

Rapid reaction services were rushed to the airport. Observers on the ground could see that the wheel remained retracted during the plane’s landing approach. The airliner made a circled over the city, during which the crew managed to deploy the wheel by using a backup hydraulic system. The landing was smooth. Nobody was hurt, and the plane was not damaged. The plane was put in a hangar for technical checks. An investigating commission has been set up.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



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