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Presidents that were Freemasons (with notes)

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posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 05:40 PM
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I don't remember who asked or what post, I just remember mentioning uknowingly that there were fewer masonic presidents then the man stated, well I knew there was only a few now I have their names...along with some notes about them.


What U.S. Presidents have been Masons?
George Washington
James Monroe
Andrew Jackson
James Polk
James Buchanan
Andrew Johnson
James Garfield
William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt
William Howard Taft
Warren G. Harding
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Harry S. Truman
(Lyndon B. Johnson)
Gerald R. Ford
Notes (in chronological order):

William McKinley's Masonic membership has not been confirmed 100%, though his name does appear on several lists. Hopefully, someone will be able to provide a definitive yes or no.
William Howard Taft was made a Mason At Sight by the Grand Master of Ohio and later raised to Grand Master of Ohio in 1909.
Harry S. Truman was also Grand Master of his home state, Missouri.
Lyndon Johnson was an Entered Apprentice, but never progressed beyond that degree.
Ronald Reagan is not a craft Mason. He was made an honorary 33rd degree Mason by the Southern Jurisdiction of the AASR and an honorary member of the Imperial Council of the Shrine, but he was never entered, passed, and raised as a Mason, nor was he ever made a Mason at sight. (Source: Robinson's Born in Blood)
Bill Clinton is not a Mason, though he was involved in DeMolay for a time.
Many other leaders in government have been Masons: "They have included fourteen Presidents and eighteen Vice Presidents of the United States; a majority of the Justices of the United States Supreme Court, of the Governors of States, of the members of the Senate, and a large percentage of the Congressmen. Five Chief Justices of the United States were Masons and two were Grand Masters. The five were Oliver Ellsworth, John Marshall (also Grand Master of Masons in Virginia), William Howard Taft, Frederick M. Vinson and Earl Warren (also Grand Master of Masons in California.)" - Henry C. Clausen

That goes for you too SelfHelp, I was right, Clinton wasn't a mason, thank god.

Sincerely,
no signature




posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 07:09 PM
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The best source of anti-masonic comments you will find on the Grand Lodge of British Columbia & Yucon website here

Well done



posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 04:01 PM
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What is your Piont?

So they joined the freemasons. Is that a bad thing? What masonic lodge has conspired against the United States? I would argue that a vast majority of the U.S. Military are freemasons. Does that make them bad people.?



posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 04:48 PM
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What happend with bush? to dumb to be a freemason?



posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 04:49 PM
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Only two presidents in U.S. History haven't been free masons from what I have been told, Lincoln and Kennedy are the only ones.



posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 08:13 PM
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I guess Masons fail to mention that before G. Washington died he wrote a letter stating:

September 25, 1798

"I have little more to add than thanks for your wishes, and favorable sentiments, except to correct an error you have run into of my presiding over the English lodges in this country. The fact is I preside over none, nor have I been in one more than once or twice within the last thirty years. I believe, notwithstanding, that none of the lodges in this country are contaminated with the principles ascribed to the society of the Illuminati.

Signed, GEORGE WASHINGTON."

Good old George saw the light before he died thank goodness.


D

posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by GrndLkNatv
Only two presidents in U.S. History haven't been free masons from what I have been told, Lincoln and Kennedy are the only ones.


Was Clinton a freemason? Cause i Heard that it was Clinton and the two that you mentioned were the only presidents who weren't freemasons.



posted on Apr, 21 2004 @ 08:56 PM
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Clinton was in DeMolay when he was younger but I'm not sure if he's a FreeMason.

I'm almost sure that Ronald Reagan was.

I have a Masonic pamphlet that says that Lincoln was a Mason; and that he never made it passed the first or second degree.

And I've heard from various sources that many of the Kennedy's were/are Masons.....




1



posted on Apr, 24 2004 @ 10:22 PM
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Man the whole country was founded upon fremasons, as was the KKK as well.


Freemasons worsship satan and his every belief is right and good, an they embrace satanism which teaches that knowledge is power, truth is nonense. This country is satans stomping ground. And it makes me sick to hear about more SOULS dying in war when Bush sits back
on his butt and makes okes about weapons of mass destruton and counts is riches all the while he too is a pawn of the Zionist government to destry theArabs through the 9/11 build up and (terorism).



Nukes will come very soon.


If any human in the military knew what was happening behind thesceens and why this war happened, they would much rather go to jail then serve this satanic, very satanic country.



we are not a christian nation by any means, and im scared to death to fathom what God will do to this country inhis judgement. I just want to move out of here so bad.




Sorry for going off lke this, but this topic makes me boil inside everytime I think of evil.




God bless.



posted on Apr, 24 2004 @ 10:26 PM
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Excuse my language. Im sorry.



posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 03:27 PM
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Tamahu is correct: Clinton was a DeMolay but not a Mason.
There have been 16 U.S. Presidents who were Freemasons. George Washingon was a life-long active Mason, having served his Lodge two terms as Worshipful Master, and it was he who laid the Masonic corner stone at the Capitol Building. He was buried with Masonic honors. Washington said in his letter that he did not preside over or visit English Lodges, which is correct. Both he and Franklin boycotted the English Lodges, but were very active in the American ones.
In reply to Tamahu, Reagan was not a Mason; however he received honorary plaques from the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite and Imperial Council of the Shriners for his service to the nation. Lincoln had applied for membership, but was murdered before he could be initiated.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 07:05 PM
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So, a disproportionate number of our Presidents were Freemasons.
DOes this tell us anything?
Is freemasonry akin to political power?
Of all the organizations a man could belong to, it seems much more than a coincidence that that meny were freemasons

Not the same religion, political party or anything else seems to be held in common.



posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
So, a disproportionate number of our Presidents were Freemasons.
DOes this tell us anything?
Is freemasonry akin to political power?
Of all the organizations a man could belong to, it seems much more than a coincidence that that meny were freemasons

Not the same religion, political party or anything else seems to be held in common.


I think those are valid questions, and would require an entire volume to answer completely. I will, however, try to hit the high points to give you an idea of the Masonic-political connections.
As mentioned before, Freemasonry as we know it is very much the product of the Age of Enlightenment. The Enlightenment era separates the medieval dark ages from the modern age, and was the primary turning point in history.
Beginning in the late 1600’s, men of learning began to stumble upon some of the mysteries of Nature. Copernicus discovered that the earth was not the center of the Universe, in direct opposition to the teachings of the Church, both Catholic and Protestant (Luther himself labeled Copernicus a “fool”).
More and more men began to question the status quo, which existed as a perfect union of Church and State. This dictatorial power saw the Enlightenment as dangerous to itself, and heretical.
Being cast out of the Church, and in some countries persecuted as criminals, these men sought congregation elsewhere. Masonic Lodges, which stressed tolerance and reason over blind faith and superstition, seemed the natural choice.
This men transformed the craftsmen’s guild into the University of the Enlightenment. The Lodges began teaching its members enlightened ideals. We now take ideas such as free speech, freedom of religion, democratic elections, etc., for granted; but during the Enlightenment, these ideas were revolutionary and “subversive”.
In the colonies, after the Revolution, our Republic was established on these basic Masonic principles. The revolutionaries were in large proportions Freemasons; and even those who weren’t subscribed to the Enlightenment.
Masons are not completely united in political views. Some are Democrats, some Republicans, some Greens, some Libertarians, some Socialists. But Masons agree on basic notions: the complete separation of church and state; freedom of religion; freedom of speech; the democratic electoral process; and opposition to all attempts to allocate public money to private or sectarian purposes.
Concerning the 16 Presidents who were Masons, we see, for the most part, that their administrations have been particularly beneficial to our nation; and that those administrations who have done the most harm have been Apostates to Masonic and Enlightened principles.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 11:54 AM
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Thanks for that explanation. It would certainly fit for an explanation for our Founding Fathers and men of that era, who were a product of the Age of Enlightenment.

I'm still wondering why so many Presidents were Freemason? So, I did a little searcching:
"Freemasonry has played a significant role in the history of the United States, so it influenced most or all of our Presidents. Some U.S. Presidents who were Freemasons were great, some failures, and some average.

Presidents have spoken of Freemasonry's good work on behalf of charity and helping others. George Washington and Theodore Roosevelt also spoke of Freemasonry as an institution that teaches us how to get along in society, with respect for the equality of everyone, tolerance of differences among people, and taking action for that which is right. "

bessel.org...

My search turned up little else of value, but this, which could be a thread in itself, and could cave ML and others from answering the same questions again and again

FreeMasonry FAQs



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 01:31 PM
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ML I appreciate your responses through out this form. I believe you are an honest seeker of truth such as I.

I was in church last Sunday drifting off as usual. While I was listening to the sermon I was pondering an idea. Our pastor was talking about the worlds religions versus Christianity. How Christianity is unique in that your salvation is not earned but given. This led me to think of Freemasonry & its structure. Most Masons will vigorously argue against the notion the Freemasonry is religious in nature. But in my opinion it at very least attempts to fulfill religions purpose.

I am in no degree an expert on this topic but a student. My opinion of Freemasonry is that it is structured like a hierarchy. My opinion is supported with the various degree works that is done in Masonry. What one person knows in one degree differs from the next on the quest for "enlightenment". There is emphasis on doing charity as you make your way up the Masonic mountain. All most like your charity in a way earns what enlightenment is gained. Just a thought I had. I'm sure I will be burned for this one. But none the less I wanted to share my thoughts.

[Edited on 26-4-2004 by oconnection]



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 05:39 PM
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Good old George saw the light before he died


There have been 16 U.S. Presidents who were Freemasons


Freemasons worsship satan and his every belief is right and good


i'm not saying much. but i can tell you these are ALL false. even though i get a chuckle out of the last one everytime i hear it.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 06:28 PM
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Originally posted by oconnection

I was in church last Sunday drifting off as usual. While I was listening to the sermon I was pondering an idea. Our pastor was talking about the worlds religions versus Christianity. How Christianity is unique in that your salvation is not earned but given. This led me to think of Freemasonry & its structure. Most Masons will vigorously argue against the notion the Freemasonry is religious in nature. But in my opinion it at very least attempts to fulfill religions purpose.


I think that depends upon how we define “religious”. If by this word we mean a fixed set of dogmatic theology, I would argue that Masonry doesn’t fit this definition. On the other hand, if we use the definition of the Apostle James, who wrote that true religion undefiled before the Father is to practice charity and keep oneself unspotted from the world, I would then argue that Masonry meets this definition, at least theoretically.


I am in no degree an expert on this topic but a student. My opinion of Freemasonry is that it is structured like a hierarchy. My opinion is supported with the various degree works that is done in Masonry. What one person knows in one degree differs from the next on the quest for "enlightenment".


There is indeed a hierarchical structure, but one based upon elected office, and not necessarily degree. For example, the only degree qualification to become Grand Master is to hold the Third, or Master Mason, Degree, and the Grand Master is the highest ranking Masonic official in the jurisdiction.


There is emphasis on doing charity as you make your way up the Masonic mountain. All most like your charity in a way earns what enlightenment is gained. Just a thought I had. I'm sure I will be burned for this one. But none the less I wanted to share my thoughts.


Personally, I believe that charity and knowledge are codependent, instead of there being a causal connection between them.. Nevertheless, I should stress that attaining a degree of Masonry does not guarantee one enlightenment. The teachings a man receives in the degrees of Masonry can point to a correct path, but unless he himself follows that path and puts the teachings into practice, the degree work has been nothing but meaningless spectacle, and our labor has been in vain.
Concerning the virtue of charity, remember, it entails much more than giving alms to the poor, or paying for a crippled child’s orthopedic treatment, although these things constitute charity. But charity also consists in our charitable words and thoughts. For example, we as humans are very quick to point out the flaws in others, while liberally forgiving ourselves for the same things. If only we could be as generous to others as we are to ourselves!
The virtue of charity reminds us that we are all imperfect, and because of that, should be careful in puffing ourselves up while degrading our fellows. If we could be as severe to ourselves as we are to others, but as charitable to others as we are to ourselves, I think we would truly not be far from the kingdom of heaven.

Fiat Lvx.


[Edited on 26-4-2004 by Masonic Light]



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 07:21 PM
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Thank you for your reply ML once more. While I respect your viewpoint I think we have a differing viewpoint on this subject. My question to you is this; how can a non-religious organization determine for its members what is moral & non moral. One definition of religion is this:

A cause, principle, or activity pursued with zeal or conscientious devotion.

Again we are back here again to this old stale question. Is or isn't Freemasonry a religion. You will tell me it isn't but yet it is fair to say by definition that it is at least loosely based on what your guys are openly willing to admit.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 10:20 PM
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Originally posted by oconnection
Thank you for your reply ML once more. While I respect your viewpoint I think we have a differing viewpoint on this subject. My question to you is this; how can a non-religious organization determine for its members what is moral & non moral.


Morality and religion are two different things, and non-religious groups make moral judgments all the time. The Boy Scouts, for example, have a moral code, as do the Miss America Committee, which enforces its code upon contestants.
The view of morality in Freemasonry is based upon natural philosophy and the formal study of ethics, rather than any instance, true or otherwise, of a divine revelation. The same is true of Boy Scouts, etc.


One definition of religion is this:
A cause, principle, or activity pursued with zeal or conscientious devotion.


Using this definition, practically anything could be said to be a religion: the study of music, the literary arts, communism, patriotism, and even care of one’s children fit this definition.


Again we are back here again to this old stale question. Is or isn't Freemasonry a religion. You will tell me it isn't but yet it is fair to say by definition that it is at least loosely based on what your guys are openly willing to admit.


Rather than stating a generalized “no, Masonry is not religion”, I would again have to say that the question is relative: it depends entirely upon how one defines religion. Freemasonry clearly contains what on its surface appears to be religious characteristics; it requires of all potential initiates to publicly declare belief in Deity, as well as an assent to the Masonic doctrine of the Brotherhood of Man under the Fatherhood of God. However, it is not a religious sect with a peculiar theological doctrine separate from formal religion. Rather, it unites men of all religions into a vast fraternal association, not bound by creed or sectarian dogmatism. For these reasons, I believe that Masonry is perhaps better described as “spiritual” than “religious”.

Fiat Lvx.



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